Gesture

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jun 21, 2009

Comments

Total: 1369, showing: 81 – 100
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In reply to:

happypoppeye: So the rescued film project doesn't have the resources to rescue film ...probably should have thought of that before creating the project.

Not one editor's picks?

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 15:47 UTC

I agree with many of the comments below. No one is asking you to process all the rolls. But process 15-20 before you go off on a "help me" campaign.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 15:42 UTC as 27th comment
In reply to:

Marty4650: The most interesting question here isn't "what is on this film" by "why does this film even exist?"

Even back in the 1950s we knew film had a shelf life. We knew it had to be used and processed quickly. Yet someone shot 1200 rolls and never processed any of it. Instead, he wrapped it up for "posterity" or something.

Just based on the one sample roll developed it is clear this was no eccentric artist like Vivian Maier. These are some very bad snapshots.

You really have to wonder why they were even taken, much less preserved for processing at some future time. A time when recovery would be difficult if not impossible to do.

This will probably always be a mystery. If there was one decent photo on that roll, then someone might be motivated by curiosity to develop all this film.

But right now, it looks like Vivian Maier's legacy is safe.

Rare to disagree with you, Marty, but looks like some interesting social documentary stuff. Anyway, 620 film is much easier to develop and work with than 35mm. A pre-development water bath would probably help with curl. There's probably some C-41 120 lines still in existence that could be converted to B&W.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 15:36 UTC
On article Sony Alpha SLT-A68 real-world samples (122 comments in total)
In reply to:

Camera Newton: Sony had a bunch of old parts collecting dust in a warehouse from all the A77II cameras that never sold and some other parts from the old parts bin. So they stuck those 2.7 inch LCDs that were laying around since 2007 on a body with leftover A77II pieces.
In 2008 Sony held more than 13% of the DSLR market. Then they had this crazy SLT idea. Guess what their DSLR/SLT market share is down to now. (hint: a 3 toed sloth could count the percentage points on his toes and have toes left over).

Nothing wrong if that were so. Sony is trying a value proposition here—and I think they have succeeded.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 15:16 UTC
On article Sony Alpha SLT-A68 real-world samples (122 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daft Punk: I have had a Sony A58 around for a few years and a few A mount lenses acquired from eBay.

Here is the thing, photo gear-snobs, get this - the A58 is actually a fantastic little camera and at the price they fetch, probably the best value camera on the planet.

It has been used as a "family camera". Passed around kids and grand kids, taken to the beach, used at birthday parties, most of the time I do not even know who in my extended family has the camera and what they are doing with it.

And you know what, that little cheap A58 has delivered some of the best photo memories of ANY camera in our ( rather large ) collection. There are prints of kids and family on walls all over the country, taken with that cheap little Sony, and video's too, sitting on people's iPads nationwide.

The A68 is a natural successor to the A58. I would choose this camera in a heartbeat over ANY Canon Rebel.

Dont knock it unless you have experience of it. :)

Great real world comments.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 15:15 UTC
On article Sony Alpha SLT-A68 real-world samples (122 comments in total)

How many AF points would this have if it were the Nikon entry-level equivalent??? Bravo, Sony. Good to see for A-mount owners. No, don't expect seven new A-mount cameras each year. But no reason an OEM can't keep the platform viable in this way.

Nice photos, Dan. You do a great job with the sample galleries.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 15:11 UTC as 19th comment
In reply to:

nathantw: It bothers me a little that the lens won't have an image circle that will cover a larger sensor. This means that Hasselblad is limiting their new lens line to some rather "small" sensors that may not last for a long time. For example, the 16 MP sensor disappeared to make room for 24 MP, 48 MP, 80 MP and 100 MP cameras. Each one of those new sensors had a different sensor size. So, Hasselblad should hope that Sony (or whoever) will make sensors that will cover the new X1D's 50 MP sensor diameters for years to come even when new sensors are introduced.

Maybe someone will post a clean sheet article. What they would have done to introduce a new mirrorless model that maximum compatibility to legacy lenses. Some way to add a focal plane shutter. Unfortunately the marketplace doesn't seem to want modular cameras. Ricoh tried.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 02:46 UTC
In reply to:

nathantw: It bothers me a little that the lens won't have an image circle that will cover a larger sensor. This means that Hasselblad is limiting their new lens line to some rather "small" sensors that may not last for a long time. For example, the 16 MP sensor disappeared to make room for 24 MP, 48 MP, 80 MP and 100 MP cameras. Each one of those new sensors had a different sensor size. So, Hasselblad should hope that Sony (or whoever) will make sensors that will cover the new X1D's 50 MP sensor diameters for years to come even when new sensors are introduced.

We've already stretched the boundaries to get something under $15,000. Let's make it a $40,000 camera. Not every camera has to have every qualification or potential. That's an awfully small sensor.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 01:48 UTC
In reply to:

left eye: The more I look at it, the more it looks like a 1st year prototype from a M.A. in industrial design; I'd give it an 'A' though.

Maybe that's what I like about it.

The fact it seems to look dated already [after a few days] is maybe because the design needed to evolve for a few extra months, to calm down, to resolve.

It's the same as Pentax did with the K-01. Keep it simpler. I find both refreshing.

But for some reasons customers want these over-wrought; over-gizmoed cameras that look like the control console of a rocket ship. The modern DLSR is locked into mucho sub-assemblies apparently. Looks like Hasselblad started with more of a clean sheet—but the critics still come out in full force rather than applauding originality?

Only flaw I see-that smudge-catcher, dust-catcher, rubbery viewfinder guard.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 21:59 UTC
In reply to:

djanrd01: My question is who is the target audience for this camera and what real innovation have they done? It seems to me that they've developed a camera for deep pocketed enthusiasts who want to claim that they have a small mirrorless camera with the biggest sensor in the industry. They tried to sell rebranded Sony cameras with with the only innovation being a new body and their name for thousands of dollars above what the cameras originally cost and were rightly crucified in the market place.

This is obviously a sophisticated, complicated digital camera, but Hasselblad—to the good—has taken the interface and digital camera doo-dads down a notch. This is for someone who goes out to look-see-photograph.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 20:02 UTC

Nice work, Damien.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 15:18 UTC as 78th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

KrisAK: I grew up shooting color slides, getting to the point of buying a bulk loader and doing E-6 processing in my parent's laundry room sink. If it didn't happen in-camera, it didn't happen, period.

So at the risk of being ex-communicated, I've got to say I never 'got' the appeal of Adams, and all that hushed talk of tonality. I had a wet darkroom in my basement, and did a massive amount of B&W for my high-school yearbook and newspaper, but the dodging and burning was strictly utilitarian; I never enjoyed that part of the process. Creativity comes in all forms, I guess, so to each his (or her) own.

KrisAK. You're entitled. I feel the same way about some other famous photographers. A lot of Emperor's Clothes in the art world.

What Adams is respected for and admired for are his overall body of work and contributions to art, especially as an educator and mentor.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 15:40 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: A little too much is made of knowing the correct exposure for the moon. EVERY photographer should know the Luny 11 rule for the moon: the shutter speed is the reciprocal of the ISO at F/11.

The biggest value of this video is to stress the importance of creating the image in your mind, rather than just a faithful reproduction of "reality." Reality is for journalism. The interpretation of a personal vision is the rest of the art.

It is ironic, however, that Adams was one of the founders of the f64 group, which called for a return to realism, after the excesses of the "pictorial" photographers. Oh, well. It is a constant tussle between photography as science and photography as art.

Yes, but even the f/64 school of photography are abstractions.

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2016 at 18:29 UTC
In reply to:

contadorfan: I was in Tucson last February & stopped by the Center for Creative Photography at Univ. Of Arizona to see a "Treasures of the CCP" exhibit where a large print of Hernandez Moonrise was on display. Near by was a metal print cabinet where one could open a large tray to see the original negative, an original working print, Adams's printing notes, & other pertaining papers. I was shocked at the dullness of the negative and by how flat and bland the straight print is. If it had been my negative & print, I probably would have tossed them, thinking I'd failed to get the exposure. I was also impressed by the detail and meticulousness of Adams's printing notes (seen in the video). It's a reminder that even the giants had to work hard to pull an excellent image out of the ordinary.

Funny that one so meticulous, exacting, & experienced as Adams couldn't find his light meter at the time!

In the new Arbus biography it says she didn't use a meter & rarely did printing manipulation. Interesting...

In a way we didn't need that light meter in old B&W film days.

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2016 at 18:25 UTC
In reply to:

KrisAK: I grew up shooting color slides, getting to the point of buying a bulk loader and doing E-6 processing in my parent's laundry room sink. If it didn't happen in-camera, it didn't happen, period.

So at the risk of being ex-communicated, I've got to say I never 'got' the appeal of Adams, and all that hushed talk of tonality. I had a wet darkroom in my basement, and did a massive amount of B&W for my high-school yearbook and newspaper, but the dodging and burning was strictly utilitarian; I never enjoyed that part of the process. Creativity comes in all forms, I guess, so to each his (or her) own.

Black and white photography as practiced by Ansel Adams, Minor White, Wynn Bullock, even W. Eugene Smith, et al, is not a depiction of "reality." It is a translation of reality into abstract, even artificial, tones. That is its appeal.

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2016 at 18:23 UTC
In reply to:

GodSpeaks: I am just glad you allowed us the option of black or white. Choice is always best.
Now if we could just have some more options for how the site appears on OUR computer. Options such as text and background color. Font and font size would also be nice.

You should be able to do that through your browser preferences.

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2016 at 02:55 UTC

Give an option of 35 percent gray; 70 percent gray. Neither choice is good.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 21:24 UTC as 162nd comment
In reply to:

EasyClick: euh... What are their designers smoking? Can't they design something made for humans? Not to mention how ugly this thing is. I've let it slide on the Quattros since it was their attempt at something different but another one??? Can that thing stand on its own without a lens? Make it a proper box and put that viewfinder far away from the handgrip.

These cameras are more like the digital version (without the modularity) of film era cameras like the Mamiya Press or Koni-Omega Rapid.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 14:49 UTC
In reply to:

nwcs: I'm a bit surprised they are pricing it there for a niche product. But I'm glad they did. I have used Foveon before and it's a cool tool. It isn't for every situation but it can do a few things that are more challenging for other systems.

Good strategy, since one is locked into Sigma SA mount lenses. But it's nice that the camera is reasonably affordable. Think of the asking price on some 1" sensor cameras.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 14:46 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1196 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: For such a small sensor I would have expected them to debut it with faster glass.
Compared to what has come before it, this is quite disappointing.

These are medium fornat lenses.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 12:43 UTC
Total: 1369, showing: 81 – 100
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