Gesture

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jun 21, 2009

Comments

Total: 1406, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article 2016 Roundup: $1200-2000 ILCs part 2: Full-Frame (346 comments in total)

Cutting it close, DPReview. I needed this before XMas shopping.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 22:49 UTC as 28th comment
On article Fujifilm launches X-A10 as entry-level X-series model (163 comments in total)

Much better idea. Just reduce cost of A model. Should be $350 tops with lens.

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2016 at 05:16 UTC as 31st comment | 1 reply
On article Throwback Thursday: Olympus E-10 (158 comments in total)
In reply to:

entoman: I've been begging for a hybrid oprical TTL and EVF viewfinder for years, so that I can switch between the two options at eye-level, and have a live histogram overlaid on (or better still, just outside) the frame area in the finder. Canon (Pellix) and Sony (SLT) have both used fixed translucent mirrors, but I wasn't aware that anyone has used a beam-splitting prism.

I'd love to see a modern version based on a similar concept to the Olympus, but with a decent-sized sensor, at least 30MP, interchangeable lenses and a glass pentaprism.

For all their superb technology, Canon and Nikon don't seem imaginative enough to advance the optical viewfinder-just preserve it. Much like Leica with the optical RF.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2016 at 15:09 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Olympus E-10 (158 comments in total)

Wonderful camera with super-quiet shutter.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2016 at 15:07 UTC as 50th comment

I wouldn't call Nikon or Canon RF "copies."

The Japanese OEMs admired the German optico-mechanical tradition and sought to pay respect to it while advancing it-which they did substantially. Even the fixed lens Japanese post-war RFs were wonderful from many brands (Konica, Ricoh, Aires, Petri, et al), introducing better RFs and viewfinders, matched to fine lenses.

For example, the fixed lens Konica IIIa had a complex shutter mechanism but a superb 1:1 RF/VF, among the best ever made. The earlier Konica II has one of the most elegant camera designs in photo history; similar to the late film era Contax G camera (Kyocera), which, interestingly, is one of the few or only attempts to build on VFing/focusing (AF + zoom of VF to view of lens in use) until Fuji's hybrid viewfinder in the digital era.

The Nikon RFs have a Contax-like lens mount; the Canon RFs used the Leica-like thread mount.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2016 at 03:20 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply
On article New kid on the block: YI M1 review (710 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mrrowe8: It's funny to read this review and I reflect back to my manual focus Minolta XgM days( 1982) & wonder how lazy have we gotten ..For the Money this is a fun for the straight up image maker /artist digital camera .. the part that is insulting in reading the review is when you read who it's "not good for " advanced user blah blah blah ..That's the part I had to stop and think sweet Jesus how lazy have we become ..

For a "poor" camera, the sample images look quite decent for a non-expert like myself.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2016 at 01:36 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Casio QV-4000 (58 comments in total)

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydscs85/3

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2016 at 04:04 UTC as 10th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Casio QV-4000 (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: I wonder if this is the same sensor as that in my Canon G2, a camera I still really like?(Own two.)

There used to be (?) a page where DPReview under Phils Askey noted all the cameras that used this lens.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2016 at 01:20 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Casio QV-4000 (58 comments in total)

Nice camera that I still own. There's a way to generate and save RAW images!

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2016 at 01:19 UTC as 13th comment
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 Review (385 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike FL: Will Panasonic make a TRUE LX7/5/... successor?

LX line had ability to use UWA and Tele add-on via tube mounted on the body, also LX7 is true 24mm - muti ration aspect sensor.

LX100 is muti ration aspect sensor too + Tele add-on with tube mounted on the body, but no UWA possible.

This LX10 has none of above. In other words, the TRUE LX line is dead so far.

If I do not have RX100.M3, I will buy Nikon DL18-50, but Nikon is kind of forgetting the DLs, but busy with laying off people.

Good notes.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2016 at 18:07 UTC
On article 2016 Holiday Gift Guide: up to $100 (31 comments in total)
In reply to:

AshMills: Do amazon sell all these things? ;-)

No need to justify. The entire site is linked to Amazon. We understand that.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2016 at 19:04 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Fujifilm FinePix F601 Zoom (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

entoman: These experimental designs are great to refect on. Funny how eventually everything evolves to look and handle like a 35mm film SLR.... e.g. Fujifilm XT2, Panasonic G85, Olympus OMD range, and of course Canon, Nikon and Pentax, who all mastered ergonomics a very long time ago!

OEMs afraid to experiment with such concepts-simplistic to use; incredible power under the hood. Look at news event, sporting event etc, dozens of folks talking photos and video, even life streaming video. Nikon could take something like the Coolpix A and make the interface SIMPLE.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2016 at 00:51 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Fujifilm FinePix F601 Zoom (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: With a 1/1.7" sensor in those days, whoever owned one had the bragging rights, when the vast majority of cameras had the 1/2.5" sensors.
The 1/1.7" sensor remains a respectable size sensor for a lot of non-critical work, but of course we now sneeze at it, especially after the invasion of the 1"-sensor-based cameras that fit in a shirt-pocket.
I have made many 8" x 10" and 8" x 12" prints from cameras with a 1/1.7" sensor, and never had a single complaint. On the contrary, they all have been happy with them. I've seen many of them framed and proudly displayed at the owners' desks at their workplace.

The Kodak Z-series (Z1085, Z1285, Z1485), for example, all came with 1/1.7" sensors, and they took beautiful images, although Kodak used cheap plastic bodies for these models.
It would've been great if Kodak had kept up with the competition, they knew "color" more than many others, but the rest of the Kodak bean-counters' debacle is now for the history books.

In these earlier years, Fuji and Kodak gave excellent value in terms of sensor and lens, as opposed to build quality and processing power. A little later on, the Kodak Z8612IS for example takes wonderful photographs.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2016 at 00:47 UTC
On article Tiny marvel: Panasonic LX10 sample photos (77 comments in total)

Nice. $450 TOPS. The OEMs don't get it.

Nice work, Dan.

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2016 at 10:36 UTC as 13th comment
On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $900-1200 (348 comments in total)

I hope they do a review for XMas time.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2016 at 02:51 UTC as 24th comment
On article Nikon reportedly eliminating 1000 jobs in Japan (535 comments in total)
In reply to:

Artpt: we're reaching Market saturation with Digital Imaging from various formats. the high camera bodies are really wonderful but very high in price and expectedly low volume production. What are real challenge for all the executives across all camera brands

Not to mention the OEMs simply don't try hard enough or unwilling to break the mold-creating a powerful, sophisticated camera with a simpler interface-and I'm not talking auto-mode on a camera with 35 buttons, dials, levers, slots, etc.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 02:50 UTC
On article Nikon reportedly eliminating 1000 jobs in Japan (535 comments in total)
In reply to:

miggylicious: The is very sad news not just for Nikon owners but for all photographers as well. It looks like all the camera companies are affected... And I'm expecting camera sales to keep on falling drastically as the newer smart phones now have incredible image quality, improved low-light and manual mode capabilities, and are now able to reproduce impressively beautiful and natural-looking bokeh using advanced algorithms. Afterall, why bring a separate camera when the smartphone can already do it all (almost)?

Not to mention, people with smartphones can snap with impunity-witness the political rallies. But bring forth a "real camera" and folks become suspicious.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 02:48 UTC
On article Nikon reportedly eliminating 1000 jobs in Japan (535 comments in total)
In reply to:

kuklukklak: This is not a surprise. The whole dslr market is shrinking because of smartphones. Some ppl here argue that professionals/enthusiasts are still buying but they account for probably less than 20% of the market of regular photo takers. The average consumer just used the iphone/samsung and has a good entry level cam for special occasions. And the more they use the phones, the less they are likely to upgrade their cams. Canon and sony have the depth to back themselves up whereas nikon relies on the dslr market too much and has been very slow in diversifying their products.

Yes. In everyday life, I see folks taking photos and videos, sharing photos and videos, some quite good and sophisticated, and enjoying—with smartphones. Photography is alive and well.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2016 at 02:45 UTC
In reply to:

BurkPhoto: I like the new MacBook Pro, and will probably get one at some point. But here's what I would still like to have:

• Built-in Blu-Ray Burner
• 1 TB startup SSD, plus some sort of slot to swap out SSDs
• Removable, hot-swappable 12-hour battery
• A better, pro-quality audio interface solution for inputs AND outputs (separate!)
• Removable retina touch screen that becomes an iPad when removed, and can be used as a Wacom-like tablet for retouching, artwork, etc. with the Apple Pencil.
• Virtual touch screen keyboard that works like that of an iPad/iPhone
• User upgradeable RAM (up to 32GB minimum, preferably 128GB)
• SD card slot that buries the card in the body of the Mac like PCs do!

This would kick the weight back up to 6 or 7 pounds, and make the whole thing thicker and/or bigger, but I DON'T CARE. I want something portable that does everything. I don't want a desktop, I just want an external monitor and a dock for my peripherals in the office...

…and NO, I don't want a Surface Pro!

Removable retina touch screen that becomes an iPad when removed, and can be used as a Wacom-like tablet for retouching, artwork, etc. with the Apple Pencil.

Brilliant idea.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 21:14 UTC
In reply to:

Brian Slater: I would have thought that after decades of second guessing Apple's moves and motives people would be prepared to give them some recognition for bold decisions that jolt industry standards foward. Peripheral connections have been shambolic for far too long. A laptop that has sufficient dedicated i/o for every kind of peripheral and connector would certainly not be totable. At long last we see real convergence. Sure, lots of folks have SD cards. But many potential users of Apple pro laptops have other card needs that never have had a dedicated slot. Memory manufacturers continue to proliferate different storage media, and camera makers enable them by choosing different types. Then there are all the disparate serial, display and networking types. At last with Thunderbot 3 / USBC-C there is a single standard that can be used to connect just about anything including power. No need to choose which slot or connector orientation. Wireless and TB3: a much simpler and more elegant future.

Except SD cards are really handy for storing/backup data files; even more compact than many USB thumb drives, although I know there are mini-types. I can even see the logic behind getting rid of optical drives-they might fail earlier than the computer as a whole-but not this.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 18:59 UTC
Total: 1406, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »