Dianoda

Lives in United States Fort Collins, CO, United States
Joined on Mar 31, 2010

Comments

Total: 133, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

racenviper: Blackmagic Design offers DaVinci Resolve for free and does 4K.

https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/

Ah, you are correct, the full license cost has come down since I first starting working with the software. A license for Studio is now $300 in the US. That said, for my needs, the free version of 12.5 has proved to be more than capable enough; honestly, I feel like I've barely touched the surface of what the software can do.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2017 at 17:40 UTC
In reply to:

racenviper: Blackmagic Design offers DaVinci Resolve for free and does 4K.

https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/

I'll second davinci resolve as an excellent free video editor - a few of the more advanced features are locked unless you purchase the full license ($1K), but all the basics and then some are available in the free version. It's a decent editor to start learning on.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2017 at 16:13 UTC
In reply to:

CaPi: What on earth,.. Won't make any sense in terms of sensor usage but hey..
this might actually be fun!

@shigzeo

I suppose a better word choice to describe the GFX+Cambo+TS-E combo relative to the HCam would have been "compact." There really is not much else out there that provides the functionality and flexibility the HCam offers, but if you just want to shoot TS-E lenses on a larger than 35mm, it's possible some may find the GFX+Cambo adapter solution more appealing.

Either way, I find myself on the outside looking in, as I've yet to touch digital MF. But as a longtime user of Canon 35mm cameras and TS-E lenses, I've always been intrigued by the prospect of using the 17mm/24mm TS-E lenses on a larger sensor.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 22:01 UTC
In reply to:

CaPi: What on earth,.. Won't make any sense in terms of sensor usage but hey..
this might actually be fun!

The 17mm and 24mm TS-E lenses have huge image circles (approx 67mm), they more than cover the GFX sensor, even with significant movements. Mounting these lenses on the GFX with one of these adapters would be quite a bit more elegant than previous solutions like the Hartblei HCam-B1.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 21:08 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Game Boy Camera (70 comments in total)

This was my first camera, got me started on photography. Image quality was, er, different compared to most other cameras. I had a lot of fun with it.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 15:05 UTC as 29th comment
On article Drone footage captures the raw power of Iceland (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

Reactive: I found Iceland to be a depressingly barren, grey and dull place to visit, and I've spent years out walking in the great outdoors. Sure it's interesting to see how the flora, fauna and humans have had to adapt to their environment, but the endless vistas of barren moonscape and Armageddon lifelessness can make for some very dull days. There's only so much rock you can shoot! This video shows that very well, so in that respect it's a great film.

As an alternative , try Tangerine Dream's 'Canyon Dreams' video; lots of rock but at least there's some colour ;-)

I was in Iceland for about a week and a half in late May, the color can be somewhat dreary during the changing seasons, but once the sun comes out, it was quite lovely. If you have the means, my vote is go. I'm certainly planning to return - I'd love to see the country in winter, and I'd like to hike the Laugavegurinn in summer.

Direct flights from the US to Reykjavik were surprisingly affordable (at least with respect to the other international travel options I researched). My group did about a 50/50 split between camping and hotels/airbnb, several days in Reykjavik and then a loop of Route 1 (aka ring road) - all-in costs (flights/car rental/petrol/accommodations/food) ended up being around US$3K/person for a 10 day/9 night trip.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2016 at 15:56 UTC
On article BenQ announces 32" 4K high dynamic range monitor (84 comments in total)

The specs quoted here for the PV270 are inaccurate. It's a 1440P display that covers 96% of DCI-P3 (which is in most respects a wider color space that adobeRGB), has several advanced features absent from the SW2700PT, such as a brightness uniformity compensation mode, quick stability on start-up, etc.

http://www.benq.com/product/monitor/pv270/

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2016 at 22:13 UTC as 19th comment
On article 2017 Roundup: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (466 comments in total)

There are several inaccuracies on page 8 in the Leica Q summary - "The Q's 28mm equivalent F1.7 image-stabilized lens is incredibly sharp and its 24MP APS-C-size CMOS sensor produces good image quality" - the lens offers a true 28mm focal length, and the sensor is full-frame. Cheers.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2016 at 04:18 UTC as 93rd comment
In reply to:

MrTaikitso: If the 'follow me' mode is as good or better than the DJI Phantom 4 does then GoPro have a hit on their hands. One thing, anyone know what the flight time is on one battery charge? Latest DJI is about 25 mins.

Gopro website specs flight time at up to 20 minutes on a one hour charge. Battery is 5100mAh 14.8V. Assuming the software/controls are fully baked, it could be a winner.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 18:48 UTC

85mm f/1.4 and 500mm f/4 cool stuff. No sealing on the 85mm is acceptable, but the lack of weather sealing on the 12-24mm f/4 is a bummer, that really limits the appeal of the lens for landscape use.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 18:44 UTC as 65th comment

Very cool, I love the focus on portability. Bundled pricing with the hero5/black5 seems pretty decent for a ready to fly gopro drone. Looking forward to reviews.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 18:34 UTC as 26th comment
On article Canon EOS M5: What you need to know (564 comments in total)
In reply to:

MasterWayne: The most important question for me: How do adapted EF/EF-S lenses perform?
Comparable to 80D's live view? Are any of the M5's features (peaking, ...) disabled?

To add on to what BEKippe had to say, yes, extreme angles of incidence for light hitting the the edges/corners of a sensor can result in increased vignetting in those sections of the frame.

There are three primary factors at play:

- lens design - flange distance
- lens design - angle of view
- sensor design, in particular, microlens arrangement/optimization, and possibly sensor stack thickness

The steepest angles of incidence will occur with ultra wide angle lenses designed for short flange distances, which could result in dark corners when paired with sensor microlens arrangements that expect less extreme angles of incidence, as the amount of light that actually reaches the photosites is reduced. However, sensor microlens arrangements can be optimized for increased light collection in these cases - and the sensor designs used in most current mirrorless cameras already make use of such optimizations. The Sony A7 line, for example:

http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52351544

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 18:53 UTC
On article Canon EOS M5: What you need to know (564 comments in total)
In reply to:

MasterWayne: The most important question for me: How do adapted EF/EF-S lenses perform?
Comparable to 80D's live view? Are any of the M5's features (peaking, ...) disabled?

"So, if Canon decided to use the 80D's sensor, do we have a vignetting issue on the M5, regardless of the lens?"

Under the assumption that Canon is indeed using an unmodified 80D sensor in the M5, light falloff would only be an issue with the native EF-M lenses. Light falloff with EF/EF-S lenses would be less dramatic because an unmodified 80D sensor would already be optimized for those lenses.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 16:05 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (805 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kelvin L: One thing that's desperately needed in the digital imaging world is a decent wide angle tilt shift solution. Hopefully Hasselblad will develop a modern Arcbody/Flexbody equivalent for the architecture and product photographer that's less clumsy than an Alpa or Sinar - something now possible with the short mount-to-sensor distance.

@shigzeo:

Ugh, you're right. That is rather problematic.

Probably unfeasible, but maybe someone could hack together a more complex adapter with built-in shutter? Or is the sensor capable of operating in a fully electronic shutter mode?

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 00:53 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (805 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kelvin L: One thing that's desperately needed in the digital imaging world is a decent wide angle tilt shift solution. Hopefully Hasselblad will develop a modern Arcbody/Flexbody equivalent for the architecture and product photographer that's less clumsy than an Alpa or Sinar - something now possible with the short mount-to-sensor distance.

An electronic Canon EF mount adapter for use with the wide angle Canon TS-E lenses would be very welcome. Would basically be a more compact and less cumbersome version of the Hartblei HCam-B1 (http://luminous-landscape.com/hartblei-cam-review/)

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 00:24 UTC
In reply to:

Dianoda: I know it was mentioned in the $1200-2000 round-up, but with respect to image quality, build, features, etc., the Pentax K-1 fits right in with this group, and seems to be a much better value than the D750 (at least for anyone who can make do with Pentax glass).

@22codfish: The "make due with Pentax glass" comment isn't meant to be a knock against the quality of Pentax lenses - from what I've seen, the lenses they make are quite good. That said, Pentax's selection of first party lenses - modern, weather-sealed full-frame lenses, at least - does not quite match the variety offered by Canon/Nikon. Some photographers may be better served by looking elsewhere if they are interested in certain niche lenses (weather-sealed primes, tilt-shifts, and/or wide aperture super-telephotos) or would prefer to have more options available (for example, Canon currently makes 4 full-frame-compatible UWA zooms).

My dpreview challenge images are from a time when photography was still new to me, and my available equipment was more limited. I currently use 500px and flickr to share my work, if you'd like to see some of my more recent photos, my dpreview profile page includes a link to my flickr photostream. Cheers.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2016 at 18:22 UTC

I know it was mentioned in the $1200-2000 round-up, but with respect to image quality, build, features, etc., the Pentax K-1 fits right in with this group, and seems to be a much better value than the D750 (at least for anyone who can make do with Pentax glass).

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2016 at 12:52 UTC as 229th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

DualSystemGuy: 14 fps sounds nice until you read the laundry list of restrictions required to get that speed, including battery type, battery charge percentage, ISO selection, AF modes, lens choices, and a variety of other camera settings.

Not surprising in the least. Pretty much all flagship sports cameras have similar qualifications with respect to achieving the maximum possible frames per second in high speed continuous drive modes, including the D5 (page 117 of the D5 manual has Nikon's laundry list).

Link | Posted on May 18, 2016 at 20:03 UTC
On article Day at the track: Canon EOS-1D X Mark II samples (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

SmilerGrogan: I'm concerned by the amount of postprocessing that needs to be done with all these new cameras because it seems like none of them can nail the correct exposure. And it's not just this Canon. Looking at the meta-data from all these cameras it seems like you guys are constantly dialing in exposure compensation in the field, and are still having to come home and do more exposure twiddling in ACR.

The amount of time needed in post is highly dependent on the photographer and the settings they choose to shoot with. For this set, we can't really place much blame on the camera for exposure errors because 18 out of the 20 RAWs provided are fully manual exposures - the photographer manually set ISO, aperture, and shutter speed - so blame the photographer if you consider any of those to be poor exposures.

Of the 2 that were exposed automatically (#'s 10 and 15 in this set), neither had exposure compensation activated, and looking at the RAWs and associated histograms, they seem to be reasonable exposures given the metering mode selected and scenes captured.

Link | Posted on May 17, 2016 at 04:02 UTC
In reply to:

tech_head: I have the MkI. I wouldn't even consider the MkII. I love the push/pull zoom.
That is one of my favorite aspects of the lens. It makes zooming while tracking very easy. I shoot cars and they approach or move away very fast.
I can't imagine getting my shots having to twist to zoom.

FYI: If you keep the lens hood on and set the zoom tension to minimum, you can use the new lens like a push-pull. Not quite as smooth as the MkI but it works pretty well.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2016 at 19:20 UTC
Total: 133, showing: 1 – 20
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