CMCM

Lives in United States Sierra Nevadas of Northern California, United States
Joined on Dec 11, 2017
About me:

CURRENT CAMERAS
Nikon D500 (critter cam #1)
Nikon D7500
Nikon D700
Nikon P950
Canon G7XII

LENSES
Sigma 150-600 f5-6.3 DG OS HSM C - Critter Lens #1
Sigma 100-400 f5-6.3 DG OS HSM C - Critter Lens #2
Nikkor AF-P 70-300 f/4.6-63.G ED VR
Nikkor AF-S 18-300 f/3.5-6.3G ED VR
Nikkor AF-P 10-20 AF-P f/4.5-5.6
Nikkor AF-S Micro 40mm f/2.8G
Nikon AF-P 18-55 f.3.5-5.6G VR
Tokina AT-X 116 Pro DXII 11-16 f/2.8
Tokina 100mm f/2.8 AT-X M100 AF Pro D
Nikon AF-S 24-85 f3.5-4.5 G ED VR
Nikon AF-S 16-35 f/4G ED VR
Sigma 15mm f2.8 EX DG Diagonal Fisheye

OCCASIONAL Cams
Nikon D5600
Fujifilm X-30 (from 2016)
Canon S95 (from 2010)

OLD RETIRED STUFF
Nikkor AF-S 18-70 f/3.5-4.5G ED (from 2004)
Nikon D70s (from 2004)

OLD BUT STILL GOOD 1980's MANUAL FOCUS & EARLY AF LENSES
All from my Nikon F3 film camera days but surprisingly good on the D700.

Nikkor 20mm f2.8 AIS
Nikkor 28mm f2.8 AIS
Nikkor 50mm f1.4 AI
Nikkor 55mm f2.8 AIS macro
Nikkor 85mm f2.0 AI
Nikkor 105mm f2.5 AIS
Nikkor 28-85 f3.5-4.5 AIS macro
Nikkor 80-200 f4.5 N AI

Vanguard Alta Pro 2+ 263AB100 (fantastic tripod!!)
Sirui Monopod + Manfrotto 234RC head
Software: Luminar 4, Affinity Pro, Photoshop CS6 (sometimes)

Comments

Total: 26, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

stratman1976: Finally. I was waiting for this one and I'm glad I did. I really don't get all the fuss about the bezels. It's standing on my desk, who cares, as longs as it performs.

I am anxious to see the performance difference between this one and my 2010 27" iMac. I've got all the mileage I can get, out of that one, having updated the RAM and HDD to SSD. It really can't cope with 45MP files that well.....

I'd be curious to know what you think after using it a bit as I'm still nursing along my own 2010 iMac 27". I've upgraded everything there is to upgrade on it, but had to leave it on El Capitan so I could still run Adobe CS6 (mainly for In Design) for business reasons. It's getting really slow, however.....I'm finally being nudged towards a new one.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2020 at 00:28 UTC
In reply to:

CMCM: Cheap Kodak cameras such as the Brownie Hawkeye etc. for the masses who weren't really photographers, followed by Kodak Instamatics and the like in the 1960s, 70s. Then Polaroid cameras gave people instant gratification to see their photos moments after shooting it. Next a couple of decades of increasingly better point and shoot cameras bought by casual non photographers. Finally, enter the smartphone . Almost everyone has one now, and it offers the bonus of a pretty good camera so the P&S market is obsolete.

It seems like the serious photographers still want cameras and lenses just like before, but this is a smaller group like it has always been. There were just too many DSLR systems out there for awhile, many bought by people who couldn't/didn't learn to use them. The casual, non-photographer market has moved on and the phone camera fits what they need. So the industry must reshuffle itself.

Exactly!

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 20:46 UTC
In reply to:

Herr Mueller: True words! In addition, in my opinion, there is also the fact that the short product cycles have created a huge used market. A camera is likely to change hands a lot more than it used to in its lifetime.

Until recently, I would never have considered a used camera or lens. In the last couple of years I have bought several used cameras and quite a number of lenses. I shopped carefully and every single thing I bought was incredibly cheap compared to new and they all look virtually unused and operate as new. Not a bad experience yet. It seems a lot of gear gets bought and remains barely used or people lose interest.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 19:06 UTC
In reply to:

hemiguy: Seems like the next shift will be complete computational photography, which will, or could, in effect flatten the digital camera / video market completely.

They're not there yet, but the smartphones are already doing insane stuff with in essence a pinhole camera. Wearables, and anything that can integrate with our everyday lives will at some point overrun traditional photography.

In that sense, all of these companies will be either out of business or building scientific gear, phones, and whatever's next, as lugging around cameras, tripods, gimbals, lenses and flash will become the next horse drawn carriage.

My daughter has less than zero interest in photography. She drives me nuts because she constantly shoots in the vertical position. Her photos are truly horrible yet she's happy as a clam with them and doesn't even analyze or critique their quality because she's just happy to have captured an event with her kids or friends. Simple as that. It's not about "photography" to her and many others like her. It's about capture the moment.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 18:58 UTC
In reply to:

CMCM: Cheap Kodak cameras such as the Brownie Hawkeye etc. for the masses who weren't really photographers, followed by Kodak Instamatics and the like in the 1960s, 70s. Then Polaroid cameras gave people instant gratification to see their photos moments after shooting it. Next a couple of decades of increasingly better point and shoot cameras bought by casual non photographers. Finally, enter the smartphone . Almost everyone has one now, and it offers the bonus of a pretty good camera so the P&S market is obsolete.

It seems like the serious photographers still want cameras and lenses just like before, but this is a smaller group like it has always been. There were just too many DSLR systems out there for awhile, many bought by people who couldn't/didn't learn to use them. The casual, non-photographer market has moved on and the phone camera fits what they need. So the industry must reshuffle itself.

You're right about it being a total lack of interest in photography. It's all about "capturing the moment". Years ago I gave my daughter a P&S and she hardly used it. On the other hand, she uses her smartphone camera constantly to photograph mostly her kids and friends. She drives me nuts because she shoots everything in vertical mode, terrible light, all that. She couldn't care less about the photo quality, she's just happy to have a momento of the place, time and people to show from her phone and to post on Facebook. She makes no pretense whatsoever to be a photographer, she just snaps photos and it makes her happy as a clam. She's happy to have a phone and camera all in one and she would never spend a penny on a camera.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 18:54 UTC

Cheap Kodak cameras such as the Brownie Hawkeye etc. for the masses who weren't really photographers, followed by Kodak Instamatics and the like in the 1960s, 70s. Then Polaroid cameras gave people instant gratification to see their photos moments after shooting it. Next a couple of decades of increasingly better point and shoot cameras bought by casual non photographers. Finally, enter the smartphone . Almost everyone has one now, and it offers the bonus of a pretty good camera so the P&S market is obsolete.

It seems like the serious photographers still want cameras and lenses just like before, but this is a smaller group like it has always been. There were just too many DSLR systems out there for awhile, many bought by people who couldn't/didn't learn to use them. The casual, non-photographer market has moved on and the phone camera fits what they need. So the industry must reshuffle itself.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2020 at 05:18 UTC as 48th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Bravin Neff: Nikon D700: 2008 to 20012. Five great years and nearly 100,000 images, including the best images I ever took. I sold it to downsize to m4/3. I don't regret the move to m4/3, but I eventually added Nikon FX back into the mix, but in the form of a D600 and then a D610. Why I didn't get another D700 is beyond me, that thing spoke to me like no camera ever has before or since.

Last summer on a whim I bought a barely used mint D700. I know exactly what you mean about that camera "speaking" to you. This thing is amazing, incredible color, I love it. I don't know what makes it so different, but there is definitely something very special about it.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2020 at 05:08 UTC

For purely nostalgic reasons, somehow and somewhere I lost track of my very first camera...a rangefinder Yashica Electro 35, bought in the Cu Chi, Vietnam PX in early 1967. This was apparently the first electronically controlled camera (hence the name "Electro), in which you selected the aperture and the camera automatically chose the shutter speed. It had an excellent fixed 45mm f1.7 lens, and my copy had a non-working light meter for most of its life. I used it sporadically until about 1979, when I got a Canon AE-1. I've recently been digitizing old slides, and I've been amazed at how lovely the photos from the old Yashica could be. Wish I knew what happened to it! However, for run I recently found an absolutely mint one that appears to have never been used, and even the light meter still works!

Link | Posted on May 27, 2020 at 16:55 UTC as 49th comment

Fun story, and took me back to my own AE-1, which I bought in mid 1979 as I was about to move to Saudi Arabia for a teaching gig. Alas, mine was plagued with light meter issues, and S.A. was not the place to get repairs. After my first meter repair, I had just arrived in the beautiful Maldive Islands when I realized the meter was kaput yet again, so all the photos I shot on this trip were my best guesses at exposure. Fortunately, it was sunny and bright and the auto function on this camera helped most of my photos to turn out pretty good. But this frustration (after an earlier Yashica Electro 35 that never had a functioning light meter either) is what led me to my two Nikon F3's in 1981 and 83, both of which still work just fine all these years later. Strange.....I really can't remember if I had the chrome or the black version. I always seem to prefer black, but the chrome might have been cheaper and I was a new young teacher back then, so I likely had the chrome version.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2020 at 03:46 UTC as 48th comment
In reply to:

Horshack: Unrelated question...I just sampled a few of their videos and noticed a filming technique where the presenter intentionally looks at the "wrong" camera during parts of the presentation. For example, at 1:30 of this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPX1wQHpq2g

At first I thought it was an editing/filming mistake but saw it repeated in their other videos. Does anyone know why this is done? It strikes me as a little odd but perhaps it's a known technique with a specific purpose?

I see this done on TV with enough frequency that it drives me nuts. I don't know why they think this is "artistic", but I find it annoying.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2020 at 18:19 UTC

I first had a used Yashica Electro 35 with a broken light meter for several years. Then In 1978 I bought my first new camera, the Canon AE-1 with a 50mm lens. In 1980 I had just arrived in the Maldives eager to shoot exotic photos with my fairly new Canon and I remember being very frustrated when the light meter in it stopped working, so there I was without a meter again! In 1981 that led me to buy a couple of Nikon F3s, and I used them for over 20 years. Wonderful cameras, and I still have them (still working perfectly) and all the great Nikkor lenses I bought to go with them, which I now can use on my digital Nikons. I was told that the revolutionary new LCD finder of the F3 would last at least 10 years (!!!)...but here it is 40 years later and they still work like new.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2020 at 16:00 UTC as 30th comment
In reply to:

D200_4me: I guess $60 isn't unreasonable for tons of storage but it's still not as good as having your own gallery you can customize like if you just go ahead and buy a Smugmug subscription. I have a feeling Flickr isn't going to make it or it will be sold off again. It's a huge drain on Smugmug (financially and by people resources too I'm sure).

I like Flickr's relative simplicity and ease of use. I explored a bunch of other sites and didn't like the interface nearly as well, and that includes SmugMug. But it's clear that people have different wants, needs and expectations. I could find a few things I might change about Flickr overall, but I found it refreshingly easy to learn and use. I recently sent them an email for help with something, and someone responded very quickly and in a personal way, and the next day followed up again. I was impressed with the response, in fact.

Link | Posted on Jan 23, 2020 at 04:42 UTC
In reply to:

ncsakany: Should have just left it alone under yahoo.

I suspect Flickr had the free accounts to attract users initially. I also wonder how many there actually are. I was a free user for over a year. I joined to test it out and see what I thought, but the 1,000 photo limit seemed huge to me and I had no impetus to buy the Pro. Then when I got back into photography more heavily, and I started digitizing old slides, I got the idea to create and upload all these old photos that my various family members could look at easily. This seemed so much more attainable than printing loads of photos and placing them in dozens of photo albums. Suddenly Flickr had a real useful purpose for my needs, and it works really well for what I do. I have zero intention of uploading all my photos, only the ones I like. A great many of what I put up is private anyway. With my Pro membership, I started exploring the Groups, and I love that aspect of Flickr. A great many people are still active on them.

Link | Posted on Jan 23, 2020 at 04:38 UTC
In reply to:

garyknrd: I just bought a two year subscription today. 97 bucks. I thought reasonable.

I renewed for another year a couple of weeks ago and then just now grabbed an additional two years at $94 or whatever it was. I really like Flickr and the price is worth it to me. I’ve taken a leap of faith that Flickr will continue for 3 more years. I don’t know why some people think things should be free. Flickr is a business not a charity.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2020 at 23:33 UTC
On article Nikon D700 Review (38 comments in total)
In reply to:

Polarity_ca: So I have been using D7200 for a number of years and have a line on a D700 and am curious to play with the FX format. Good price -$500 and a couple of lenses (DX) with a 4200 shutter count. I have some old pro level Nikon glass and curious how it would work. Thoughts?

I got a mint condition D700 a few months ago....specifically to play around with my old Nikkor AIS Manual focus lenses that I used in the 1980s with my F3s. I'm really happy with the old lenses, and they work beautifully with this camera.

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2019 at 03:02 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: the Nikon D700 (132 comments in total)

Late to this party! I went from a D70s to a D5600 to a D7500, and threw all my $$ into DX glass for the most part. But I just bought a mint D700 with 12,000 clicks and it's absolutely pristine, and I'm in love with this fabulous camera. Frankly, it doesn't seem 11 years old and is actually more like my D7500 than I thought it would be. The features and build of the D700 are phenomenal, and I love everything about it. I got it to be a FF to use with my 1980s manual focus lenses that I used with my F3s, and they work beautifully on the D700. It's also great with my two new FF lenses including a 100-400 zoom, and it works great with some 1980s era lenses (including old AF) I inherited from my dad. This camera is purely incredible, like a work of art, and I love shooting with it. It's fun seeing what such an expensive camera is like even though it's not totally the latest and greatest in specs. And 12MP is enough for what I shoot.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2019 at 02:18 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

NistelRoony: As an enthusiastic photographer I’m very happy with Luminar ...

Me too. And Skylum (Luminar) makes a big deal about being an alternative to the subscription model. Considering how great the program is, the price is actually ridiculously cheap to own it. Lots of discounts out there, too.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2019 at 03:44 UTC
In reply to:

yetishot: luminar 3 ! Its getting better and better although I still like to tweak in LR

This whole Adobe subscription business nudged me to check out Luminar & Affinity. I've been using CS6 for years and it still works beautifully, but I guess I have to keep it on my MacBook Pro (2010 model) and can't expect to run it on a newer Mac. Hence the Luminar & Affinity trials I did. I got them so incredibly cheap (Luminar on sale for $49, Affinity for $59) that I figured why not try them out? I love Luminar 2018, it works perfectly. I got a free download of Luminar 3 (free update), but I'm trying to figure out how to turn OFF their "Library" feature because I don't want it. It doesn't seem to work quite right yet. But kudos to Skylum/Luminar...they do lots of continual updates.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2019 at 03:28 UTC
In reply to:

wcan: I don't care about the storage (I can buy my own), but I do care about LR and PS....hopefully this won't happen....I mean doubling the price!! (regardless of what the "original" price was...that's kind of irrelevant now..years later).

Another vote for Luminar.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2019 at 03:17 UTC
In reply to:

felix from the suburbs: I guess more people these days need to have a phone handy than a camera and, if your phone already takes photos, - then why carry around something extra like a camera? At least that is what my kids tell me.

Agree! My two kids and also my granddaughter used to have little P&S cameras, as recently as about 2 years ago. They weren't into photography per se, they just wanted to take photos with something small they could carry around with them. When they all got phones with decent cameras, all interest in their small cameras ended. The phones were way more convenient, mindlessly easy to use, zero learning curve, etc, and this was because they all lacked a basic interest in photography as many of us know it. I have an iPhone too, and find it extremely useful, but due to my long interest in traditional photography, I maintain an interest on a different level and buy new cameras. However, in the few remaining camera shops, and even in Best Buy's camera section, I do see a lot of young people with a new interest in cameras and in photography who will buy DSLRs, so I find that encouraging.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2019 at 23:56 UTC
Total: 26, showing: 1 – 20
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