Marty4650

Marty4650

Lives in United States NC, United States
Works as a Retired Industrial Engineer
Joined on May 20, 2005

Comments

Total: 1602, showing: 81 – 100
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The keyword here is "magazine" and not "photography."

ALL magazines are in deep trouble today. Literally hundreds have disappeared and were replaced by websites.

And please notice the cover price. In 1937 it was 25 cents, today most special interest magazines cost $6.95 or more, which even after accounting for inflation is a lot more. And they are competing against websites that are essentially free.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 12:40 UTC as 99th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

OlyPent: Eventually, will this thing end-up on the used lens market?

I cannot imagine why a part deep inside a lens would be designed to "crumple." Especially one that took six hours to find and replace. Most times labor costs more than parts.

If there were "crumple designed parts" they would be on the outside of the lens, or at least near the exterior..

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2017 at 00:52 UTC
In reply to:

OlyPent: Eventually, will this thing end-up on the used lens market?

If this is indeed a design flaw.... then Sony should have the same piece made in high grade stainless steel, and use it whenever the lens comes back for repair.

But it isn't the replacement part that adds much cost. It would probably be a twenty cent part. It is the huge amount of hand labor needed to get to it.

It really is a shame Sony didn't use a better grade part on such an expensive lens. It would have been much easier to build it right the first time. But I suppose that is how business economics works today. You use the cheapest part you feel will "be sufficient."

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2017 at 20:02 UTC
In reply to:

OlyPent: Eventually, will this thing end-up on the used lens market?

"minty condition..... used only one time... changing systems, so my loss is your gain"

Of course, they leave out the part where it was dropped down a flight of stairs.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2017 at 19:48 UTC
In reply to:

Stacey_K: I honestly don't care how good a lens is optically, when they have something like that thin aluminum plate in them that will bend and screw up the lens if you just bump it into something, I have ZERO interest in owning it. It's the reason I don't own the 24-70 F2.8G nikon, it has a design flaw where the zoom ring screws up if the lens is ever bumped. They need to understand these things are going to be used. You don't have to be able to drive nails with them but they do need to be able to survive a bump without needing a $1000 repair.

Lenses probably COULD be built to withstand two foot drops onto concrete, but would you be willing to pay twice as much for a lens that was heavier and bigger?

And you can buy a car with bulletproof glass and a bomb resistant floor plate, but few people actually need one or are willing to pay for them.

It really just depends on how much risk you are willing to assume. I've owned hundreds of lenses for half a century, and never destroyed one by dropping it. Maybe I am just lucky, or maybe I am typical?

Of course, it might be cheaper to buy the best lenses, then buy accident insurance for them, rather than buying bulletproof lenses.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2017 at 17:24 UTC
In reply to:

OlyPent: Eventually, will this thing end-up on the used lens market?

Odds are... any lens taken apart and reassembled by Lensrentals has just had the best QC examination possible. Any thing wrong will be corrected. Anything out of spec will be fixed.

I'd rather buy a lens from Lensrentals than one from ebay, KEH or Craigslist.

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2017 at 17:21 UTC
In reply to:

mosc: I didn't understand the advantage of this over an FZ20 and I still don't understand the appeal of this segment today. Maybe I've just never been a big fan of slow telephoto lenses (f4.2 1/2.5" was dark even then). The Canon S1 IS I owned at the time this came out was anchient but the lens was very similar and the size wasn't that different. 40mm thick is less than 66mm thick... but neither one is going into my pocket. I got a little elph a bit later on because it had 1/2.33" 28mm f2.8 and even that was too big for a pocket. Cell phones are THIN and still people complain about those in their pocket. I don't see the size difference as that significant.

I owed both the FZ20 and a TZ1, and while they had much in common, there were several differences:

- TZ1 was much smaller, and half the weight
- TZ1 cost considerably less than the FZ20
- TZ1 was two years newer, and could go up to ISO 1600
- TZ1 had a larger LCD screen with more resolution
- TZ1 had better video, even though both were pretty bad

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 23:25 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: I had this camera, and I loved it. Sure, this was no low light shooter, but it was great in good light, and had a very useful range for travelers and casual shooters.

This is the camera that created a whole new category. And just to show you how far the concept has been pushed we have the latest successor the ZS100, which also has a 10X zoom range, and is better in every way possible, but costs three times more.

And is probably well worth it....

The TZ1 didn't have any EVF, so I think it is fair to say the ZS100 is a big improvement over it.

And like you said, "the Canon G7X II isn't a 10X zoom." It is a 3X, and in an entirely different category of camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 21:10 UTC

I had this camera, and I loved it. Sure, this was no low light shooter, but it was great in good light, and had a very useful range for travelers and casual shooters.

This is the camera that created a whole new category. And just to show you how far the concept has been pushed we have the latest successor the ZS100, which also has a 10X zoom range, and is better in every way possible, but costs three times more.

And is probably well worth it....

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 13:34 UTC as 42nd comment | 2 replies

Ahhhh.. the Rolex of convertible laptops!

This will probably be a big seller in Dubai.

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2017 at 13:06 UTC as 19th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

leonche64: This is the right direction. Sony went from 20+ models a year down to around 8 and the move was financially beneficial to them. Not many people are missing the pink and purple $120 models.

Isn't that the truth!

If anyone needs any further proof that the market is shrinking, then just look at the number of new cameras models on Dpreview's timeline for the past few years:

2012 - 166
2013 - 131
2014 - 101
2015 - 73
2016 - 58

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2017 at 12:58 UTC

It did seem overly ambitious to introduce not one but three high end large sensored DL compact cameras into an already crowded market. It had all the markings of a big money loser for Nikon.

My guess is that the bean counters at Nikon overrode the design engineers and convinced the board to drop the whole concept. And this sort of thing happens more often than you would think, but it usually happens much earlier in product the development cycle.

In this case, the product was announced and even produced in small quantities before being shut down. It really makes one wonder how much money Sigma is losing on their four Dp fixed lens cameras? And how much they will probably lose on their sd MILC line?

These decisions have very little to do with "what someone wants" and more to do about "what we can sell at a profit." And it probably is a good thing for Nikon that the accountants prevailed.

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2017 at 12:52 UTC as 111th comment
In reply to:

LFPCPH: Does it come with a powerfull computer with a fantastic screen to see the pictures on ?

No, but you could buy a Fuji XT2, a powerful computer, and a fantastic screen for less money than a GFX 50S body would cost.

I know... its not the same. Medium Format just isn't for folks on a tight budget.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 18:54 UTC
In reply to:

Stejo: Are we getting similar articles for all manufacturers or canon was the only one who paid?

I think this article is necessary because Canon's product line is so confusing. Someone had to explain and clarify it.

They even cluttered their full frame lineup with 5 different models (1DX II, 5D IV, 6D, 5DS, 5DS R) with 4 of them being very similar in most ways. Although it is fair to say the entry level buyer needs this sort of information more than the high end buyer does.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 09:46 UTC
On article Fujifilm updates X-mount lens roadmap (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

racin06: NEWSFLASH TO SONY: This is how a lens lineup should look. The key is to actually have lenses in the lineup ;) .

Sony is actually doing a pretty good job of designing lenses for their full frame FE cameras. It is the APSC camera lenses that are lacking. They seem to be following the Canikon path of forcing their APSC users to buy full frame lenses.

Fuji doesn't have that temptation to deal with, because they have no full frame cameras. At least not yet.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2017 at 22:47 UTC
On article Leica SL Review (1090 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: You buy Leica for the lens, not the camera. And good news everyone, you can buy SL and adapt to A7R II as SL's flange distance is 1mm longer than E. Other people should just buy an A7R II and 3/4 Zeiss/GM lenses

Or, for the price of the SL alone you can buy a pretty decent used car....

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2017 at 22:06 UTC
On article Leica SL Review (1090 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: If I didn't know better, I would swear that the Leica SL was designed to make the Sony A7RII look good by comparison. It even makes those Sony FE G Master lenses look like bargains....

I'm not certain of this, but I think the R3 was based on the Minolta XD/11. It was built in Portugal by Leica, but all the electronics came from Minolta. And yes, it was a pretty ugly beast of a camera.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2017 at 22:04 UTC
On article Leica SL Review (1090 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bhima78: This is the best TL:DR from the review, and really sums up this whole camera:

"In the SL, Leica has undeniably created their most practical, well-rounded camera yet. In doing so, in making a camera seemingly aimed at maximum practicality - as a tool for creating images and less as an experience - they've robbed it of some of that intangible charm that usually accompanies their products."

It is really true!

Leica robbed this camera of the intangible charm of having to remove the bottom plate to change a battery or memory card. This could be a serious blunder by Leica.

No intangible charm, no sale!

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2017 at 18:52 UTC
On article Leica SL Review (1090 comments in total)

If I didn't know better, I would swear that the Leica SL was designed to make the Sony A7RII look good by comparison. It even makes those Sony FE G Master lenses look like bargains....

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2017 at 18:30 UTC as 151st comment | 12 replies
On article Leica SL Review (1090 comments in total)

Carey, thanks for a well written and comprehensive review of a very interesting camera. It isn't a camera for me, but it is arguably the first modern ILC camera produced by Leica.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2017 at 18:26 UTC as 152nd comment | 1 reply
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