Marty4650

Marty4650

Lives in United States NC, United States
Works as a Retired Industrial Engineer
Joined on May 20, 2005

Comments

Total: 1626, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Caltech research team develops lensless camera (32 comments in total)

Wow... now I feel bad for Sigma, Tamron and Tokina!

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2017 at 00:27 UTC as 10th comment
On article Hot mess: Remembering the Leica M8 (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: Barney.... the M8 would have been a good candidate for Throwback Thursday.

Just sayin'......

Very true Barney, but it wasn't tagged as such, so I just assumed it was another well written article about a very interesting camera.

My mistake! :)

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 17:06 UTC
On article Hot mess: Remembering the Leica M8 (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZeroGravitas: What is the point in these cameras?

It was the answer to the question... "why isn't there a real rangefinder digital camera?"

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 17:04 UTC
On article Hot mess: Remembering the Leica M8 (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: In 2007, Phil Askey found it fit to give an "Highly Recommended" commendation to this camera.

...a camera that was "decidedly unpolished", "rough around the edges", "a buggy mess", which "crashed frequently" and produced JPEGs that "tended to look a bit murky", with RAWs only providing "acceptable results", all this while "getting worryingly hot", a "hot mess", if the title of this article is anything to go by.

It took 10 years for DPR to tell things as they actually are, regarding this camera.

This is what photography enthusiasts have to take into account anytime a specialized publication - any publication - decides to write a piece about a new Leica product.

Respect and reverence is a wonderful thing but, in what regards to accurate reporting, it can be quite detrimental.

...as detrimental as having ones vision temporarily impaired by pesty floating red dots ;)

I believe Phil liked it so much, he bought one for himself! With his own money!

So you know he was sincere in his praise.

I don't think Dpreview was being inaccurate. At the time, the M8 was a truly remarkable and unique camera. Many of the problems this camera had were not immediately obvious.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 13:52 UTC
On article Hot mess: Remembering the Leica M8 (111 comments in total)

Barney.... the M8 would have been a good candidate for Throwback Thursday.

Just sayin'......

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 13:48 UTC as 31st comment | 3 replies
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

pkcpga: I wish Olympus would come out with a m4/3 or 1" sensor rugged camera, something Sony rx100 sized but durable and waterproof.

Nikon did precisely that with their rugged Nikon 1 AW1 camera.

But no one bought one.

And that might explain why no other camera maker is interested in developing a rugged camera with a 1 inch sensor.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 13:56 UTC

I didn't see any bad or ugly photos here. Only good ones. In fact, very good ones.

I suppose we will see those in another part of this series.... :)

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2017 at 13:15 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: "The GH5 is large for a Micro Four Thirds camera"...
Many folks will not know that this means. Why not say how big it is compared to the other cameras in the roundup?

Panasonic offers five different current models, ranging from the smallest MILC on the market to one of the largest ones. Something for everyone.

For every person who says "the GH5 is too big" there are around a dozen more who say "the GX85 is too small." Having more options is a very good thing and should never be considered a liability. If it is too big for one person, then it is just right for someone else.

I could also make the case that the Nikon D5 is "too large for a full frame camera" when the Nikon D750 is so much smaller. But no one would take that comment seriously.

They only make these silly comments about M4/3, and not about any other system that offers multiple size cameras.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 14:19 UTC
In reply to:

Jorginho: Still don't see why Em1.2 would be pricey and similar priced cams like Fuji, which needs a grip to achieve really good performance or D500 not. They offer nothing over the Em1.2 in total. Sure the d500 is even better at action shooting, but it lacks on the video end and pure speed. Also IBIS is not there where it is fantastic on the Em1.2. Same goes for fuji with some good glass has no OIS and the body has nothing either. Then there is GH5. A very good stills cam and a superb video cam that is far superior to anything even close to it for video especially.

The EM1 II is "pricey" but the Leica TL isn't? Every camera in this roundup is in the same price range. And they vary in their features and performance.

OK... if it "costs to much for what it is" then someone must explain why the $1,800 Leica doesn't get called "too pricey" when it is out performed by a $500 Olympus EPL8.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 10:55 UTC
On article Nikon announces prices for 100th Anniversary products (114 comments in total)

I'm waiting for YI to offer their "First Anniversary M1" this September.

Not only will it be specially marked as a commemorative, but it will sell for half the price of the original.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 22:46 UTC as 36th comment
In reply to:

Marty4650: 2008 might have marked the beginning of the end for small sensored Superzoom Bridge Cameras. At least until Sony figured out how to put larger sensors in them in 2013. Then Panasonic and Canon followed suit, and they had a renaissance.

Back in 2008 you could buy a DSLR two lens kit for around $500, and that seriously killed the market for superzoom cameras with tiny sensors that cost the same, and were almost as large, or sometimes even larger than a DSLR.

Tom... think back. The market literally died for 12X Superzoom cameras, largely due to two lens DSLR kits selling for around the same. Lots of people don't mind changing lenses in order to achieve much better image quality and still have the same effective zoom range.

The Superzoom revival was led by two things. Large sensor superzooms, and much higher zoom ratios on the smaller sensor ones. If you really want a 60X or 70X zoom range, then no two lens DSLR kit can do that. You need around four lenses, and they get pretty big.

And that is precisely the choice you have today. The market has sorted it out for you. You can buy a large sensor superzoom if you are happy with an 8.3X to 25X zoom range, or a Nikon P900 if you require 83.3X zoom range. The choice is yours and having more choices is a good thing.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 16:38 UTC

2008 might have marked the beginning of the end for small sensored Superzoom Bridge Cameras. At least until Sony figured out how to put larger sensors in them in 2013. Then Panasonic and Canon followed suit, and they had a renaissance.

Back in 2008 you could buy a DSLR two lens kit for around $500, and that seriously killed the market for superzoom cameras with tiny sensors that cost the same, and were almost as large, or sometimes even larger than a DSLR.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 16:12 UTC as 13th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

justmeMN: CIPA figures also show that 64% of ILCs shipped this year were DSLRs, and 36% were mirrorless.

True. We can assume that some of the DSLR numbers for 2008-2011 were MILC cameras, since they weren't broken out into separate categories until 2012. So you are right. In 2011 less than 100% of that number were DSLRs, but probably more than 80% given the trend that followed for the next five years.

I think the trend is pretty well demonstrated by the year on year numbers. and the year to date on year to date numbers.

Specifically, April 2016 vs. April 2017, MILC up 67.8%, DSLR down 10.8%. Jan to April 2016 vs. Jan to April 2017, MILC up 50.6%, DSLR down 9%.

You can call these results insignificant, but I bet the planners at Nikon and Pentax are paying close attention. Over the past five years in a market that has dropped like a rock, the MILC segment is essentially flat. In relative terms, it is the best performing market segment.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 17:21 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: CIPA figures also show that 64% of ILCs shipped this year were DSLRs, and 36% were mirrorless.

Here's some more figures, broken down by region:

MILC market share of ILC market for 2017 so far:
24% - Americas
29% - Europe
44% - Japan
44% - Asia
49% - Other Areas

36% - Worldwide

This sure looks like an East vs. West sort of thing. MILC cameras have captured almost half the ILC market in Asia, Japan, and Other Areas, while only achieving around a quarter of the ILC market in Europe and the Americas.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 16:04 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: CIPA figures also show that 64% of ILCs shipped this year were DSLRs, and 36% were mirrorless.

In 2011, CIPA figures showed us that 100% of ILCs shipped were DSLRs.
In 2012 it was down to 80%
In 2013 it was down to 80%
In 2014 it was down to 76%
In 2015 it was down to 74%
In 2016 it was down to 73%
In 2017 it is down to 64%

Something is happening.
It makes you wonder what will happen six or seven years from now.

Canon seems to be pondering the question. Nikon is pretty much in a fog.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 02:01 UTC
In reply to:

GreatOceanSoftware: I've owned 40-50 cameras through the years. All manufacturers and most formats. I've learned when purchasing a digital camera to place the most value on image quality out of the camera. It doesn't matter to me much anymore what combination of buttons and menus I had to use to prepare for the shot. Sure, certain body specifications are still important, e.g. weather sealing, but at the end of the day when I add a photo to my library, I want one that pleases me to see and share. Technology will come and go, and forever make changes to the equipment we use, but I just love making the images.

Let's be clear about this.

"DSLR or MILC" has absolutely nothing to do with image quality. Ergonomics.... yes. Type of viewfinder.... yes. Size and weight..... yes. But the image quality is determined by the sensor and the lens, and has nothing to do with the presence or absence of a mirror that flops up and down.

Compare APSC cameras to APSC cameras, and compare full frame cameras to full frame cameras. And make sure they have very similar lenses on them. I defy anyone to find an image quality difference that was caused by the flange distance or the mirror.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 01:27 UTC
In reply to:

Petrogel: Japan is not in Asia ?

Japan is probably a unique market, due to culture or other factors.

If you look at their population and the number of MILC cameras "shipped to Japan" since 2012, then the Japanese are five times more likely to purchase a MILC camera than the Europeans are, ten times more likely than people from North or South America, and twenty times more likely than other Asians.

This cannot be a random coincidence. Japanese consumers seem to like MILC cameras more than anyone else does.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 01:00 UTC
In reply to:

Petrogel: Japan is not in Asia ?

Consider this.... Japan has 1.7% of the world's population, and has had over 20% of MILC shipments since 2012, when CIPA started to reporting them separately.

In most months, more cameras are shipped into the Japanese home market than either Europe or The Americas.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2017 at 12:25 UTC

Another interesting trend.....

The Japan home market share of MILC shipments declines as the "Rest of Asia" market increases. This likely reflects the growth of the MILC market in China and India, from 35.3% to 49.1%. Almost 63% of MILC shipments went to Asia + Japan in 2017.

The Americas and Europe show a downward trend for all camera sales.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2017 at 12:21 UTC as 39th comment
On article 2017 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Cameras (275 comments in total)
In reply to:

reuptake: What is striking here: most of the cameras included are quite old. Only Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2500 is younger than one year. As I'm considering buying one before my holidays in July, anyone has any clues about newer versions? Is it worth waiting? I see that many were introduced in June.

Sreven... just imagine what happens the day a relatively small sensored bridge camera can replace a $2,000 DSLR and $5,000 worth of lenses!

I'm am somewhat like you. The only camera in this group that interests me is the relatively small Panasonic TZ100. Yes, it is seriously compromised, but it still does a lot and is pocketable. All of the others are just cheaper, but poorer substitutes for a DSLR and several lenses.

But I really can see where someone would want a camera like a big honking RX10. Which is why we have so many different cameras on the market. Something for everyone.

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2017 at 17:45 UTC
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