David 247

David 247

Lives in Philippines Tarlac City, Philippines
Works as a Retired in the Philippines. Travelblogger
Joined on Jul 23, 2005
About me:

Former military, medical and industrial photographer doing mostly technical and not very creative photography. (about 13 years) Most recently a fraud and compliance manager for a global corporation, including 11+ years in the customer support industry (internationally). Officially retired and will be relocating to the Philippines by end of summer 2015. Lived and worked there before so know what I'm getting into and relish the challenge of photographing as many of the 7,107 islands as time allows documenting the people, places and beauty of that nation.

Comments

Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »
On article Yashica is teasing a comeback to the camera market (286 comments in total)

They are promoting smart phone lenses. A clip-on wide angle and a macro. It's on page 2 of the website. But I really liked seeing the Yashica TLR's. My first medium format camera was a 124G Loved that thing. Small, light but great image quality.

But for now, I think they are pointing towards clip on lenses for smart phones but supposedly of good quality. Specifically they are showing a 110 degree wide and a 15X macro. Aspheric lens design, no blurry or dark corners they say.

HK$368 about $47 US

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2017 at 16:21 UTC as 107th comment
In reply to:

photo099: L.O.L... why NOT $7,500.00 or $17,500.00... no lawyers, but $75,000 000.00?... Give me a break, Pls.

It is common in lawsuits of this nature to ask the maximum possible, knowing that it will be less. The 75 Million is probably an estimate based upon a single use license for global use. Actual damages are certain to be negotiated way down. But they idea is ask for the worst possible scenario in damages and then negotiate. If she can show reasonable cause for declaring the 75 Million, then it gives here lots of bargain room. A judge can declare the amount excessive if there is evidence to indicate that. It's a contract negotiation taking place in court. If there is cause to show that P&G's abuse was excessive then the judge may likely rule more in her favor. If they judge rules her claims of damages excessive, then they will be reduced, possibly in P&G's favor. The chance is good that either way she will get a good paycheck, but probably not 75 million.

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2017 at 08:29 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1383 comments in total)
In reply to:

Derek Midgley: Hey DP Review, your EM1 ii studio comparison images are missing .. had to play with the 'mode' box to select 'normal' before any would display .. default setting incorrect?! Or is it just my "Chrome"?

Not just your chrome. Have same problem with Safari. The widget is not defaulting to Normal on some cameras that require a choice (even something like manual or electric shutter). But you figured it out.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 18:58 UTC
In reply to:

danieljcox: Just another example of misinformation that could qualify as Fake News. Happy the Panasonic brass understood the need to clarify. It's full steam ahead with the introduction of the GH5 which I'll have in my hands tomorrow. Until then you can see check out my friend and colleague Mark Toal with a pre GH5 launch at Paul's Camera in California here https://www.facebook.com/markcomon/videos/10158460909290596/

Actually it was the The Nikkei Asian Review that reported the information incorrectly and made assumptions. CNN and other news outlets may have just repeated what the Japanese business news said. Panasonic has clarified quickly and all is well. Just an internal reorganisation. Their camera business is alive and well. Chip business who knows? Multi-facted, multinational corporations frequently go through all kinds of re-organisations without impacting their core businesses.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 13:39 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: the Olympus C-2100UZ (128 comments in total)

YES!!! That was my first digital camera. Loved it. Wish I had not sold it. Amazing for it's 2mp image size. Not the prettiest camera on the block but it was definitely functional and fun.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 13:49 UTC as 66th comment

Really enjoyed this article. Fascinating story. Sad that the demand for real photojournalism is fading, at a time when it may be more important then ever. I applaud those with the stamina and determination to do the job.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 02:13 UTC as 16th comment
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1383 comments in total)
In reply to:

lzeppelin: Through the years physics do not change. the image quality in critical light conditions and resolution are directly proportional to the sensor diagonal size. This is theory of signals and Studio Scene confirms this. As long as I can shot very still subjects and use low ISO, it's okay, but if you need to freeze the moment, and have to raise the ISO, this sensor size is still too far from the full format performance, to be taken seriously by professionals. Micro 4/3 estimators should live with it, that format was wrong from the beginning, and now we can all forget it. The low performances of this new camera in low light prove it. Damn that time when I let your clamor convince me and I bought a pen-f, which is just good looking camera and nothing more!

Fine art prints are prints made for display in a variety of locations. They can be smaller prints or very large prints. Generally decorative, they can also be educational or entertaining. They can be photographic or various duplications of any printable artform. Photographic art prints are generally high quality, printed larger then 11x14 inch for the purpose of viewing in homes, businesses or other venues. At base ISO I have produced "Art Prints" up to 24x36 inches from a 1 inch sensor and they are excellent at normal viewing distances. Landscapes, nature, modeling and commercial graphic photos are among the most common photographic art prints but there no strict guidelines. Art Prints = images, photographic or otherwise intended to be displayed as ART.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 20:08 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1383 comments in total)
In reply to:

lzeppelin: Through the years physics do not change. the image quality in critical light conditions and resolution are directly proportional to the sensor diagonal size. This is theory of signals and Studio Scene confirms this. As long as I can shot very still subjects and use low ISO, it's okay, but if you need to freeze the moment, and have to raise the ISO, this sensor size is still too far from the full format performance, to be taken seriously by professionals. Micro 4/3 estimators should live with it, that format was wrong from the beginning, and now we can all forget it. The low performances of this new camera in low light prove it. Damn that time when I let your clamor convince me and I bought a pen-f, which is just good looking camera and nothing more!

Not everyone needs very low light ability. In the last 5 years I haven't had a single need for ISO above 1600 and even those needs are small. It all depends upon what kind of photography you do and what your needs are. m4/3 is excellent for some people and not so good for others. There are many different cameras because there are many different needs. If I was a photojournalist, I would want full frame with exceptional available light capability. If I was doing commercial photography I would want very high resolution sensors for maximum detail. If I was a sports photography shooting indoors I would need high speed fast lens and high ISO. Choose what you need in a camera. There is something out there for everyone and every professional and amateur need. Or is there something about the EM1-II that makes you jealous?

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 15:55 UTC
In reply to:

Alphaloki: Be nice if they had the balls to post a release date. You've had 3 freaking years. Which is like 10 in the electronics industry. Yeah, yeah, I know earth quakes n such. That was a while ago, so get with the program and announce a release date. Until then, it's vaporware everyone's talking about down below...

They did imply by the end of the year. I'm sure they will provide a more specific date soon enough. Very likely it will be out well before the Panasonic GH5.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 03:37 UTC
In reply to:

AshMills: Yum. Looks like a really well-thought out setup. And so nice to have a new crop factor to discuss.

Nothing new about the crop factor. Same size as the new Hasselbad and the Pentax 645.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 23:43 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-F707 (141 comments in total)

Ah yes. I remember it well. I had the 828 myself, and at the time was living in the Puget Sound working out of Bremerton. Have a number of shots taken with the 828 there in Seattle. That would have been back in 2003 to 2004. Loved that camera and it was built like a tank. (heavy for its size). Only real short-coming for that day was a very high level of CA on some shots. Kind of wish I had kept it as a collector. It was a fun camera to shoot with.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 01:50 UTC as 36th comment

I did the old wire coat hanger with cardboard for dodging in burning in my younger day. Fascinating though about his enlarger and the microwaving. But he was correct. Much easier to judge exposure and detail when the print is dry.

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2016 at 12:19 UTC as 50th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

David 247: Photography by its very nature is always manipulated and always has been to a some degree. No camera or film ever produced, shows exactly what the human eye sees and how the human brain interprets it. In fact, no two people ever see exactly the same. There is a realm of reasonable representation and some level of acceptable interpretation by the photographer. Reasonable adjustments of highlights, shadows, color, etc are generally acceptable. What is not acceptable for documentary work is adding or removing elements or modifying elements in a way that is unnatural or false. Take the same photo at the same moment with different cameras and receive widely different impressions of what eyes and mind see. None will show exactly the same. All would qualify as reasonable representations. Limited post processing is reasonable as long as it does not significantly alter the subject as seen. There are no limits on artistic work as long as it is stated as such.

All film processing required extensive darkroom work in the early years, and even with the advent of "chromes" (slide film) there was extensive pre-printing work done. None of that is new. Those who believe images should not be adjusted are the ones living in a dream world. The human mind is the most powerful image processor created and even it modifies images according to each individuals expectation. And while there are some great camera tech today, none of it can duplicate the human eye and mind. No photographic image can be "true" to what the person saw. Photographers attempt to recreate a similar image to what they saw, as they saw it, because they cannot ever reproduce exactly what they saw. Photography is both documentary and art, we can only try to be true to the intent desired and be honest about it. If it is documentary it should not have added, removed or altered core elements. Art allows total imagination and freedom. We just have to be honest about both.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2016 at 01:13 UTC

Photography by its very nature is always manipulated and always has been to a some degree. No camera or film ever produced, shows exactly what the human eye sees and how the human brain interprets it. In fact, no two people ever see exactly the same. There is a realm of reasonable representation and some level of acceptable interpretation by the photographer. Reasonable adjustments of highlights, shadows, color, etc are generally acceptable. What is not acceptable for documentary work is adding or removing elements or modifying elements in a way that is unnatural or false. Take the same photo at the same moment with different cameras and receive widely different impressions of what eyes and mind see. None will show exactly the same. All would qualify as reasonable representations. Limited post processing is reasonable as long as it does not significantly alter the subject as seen. There are no limits on artistic work as long as it is stated as such.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2016 at 12:19 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
On article Apple Photos gets smarter in iOS 10, macOS 'Sierra' (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

Scott Birch: For 'smart' read 'creepy'. It's not Apple's business who's who or where. Puke.

Scott Birch: "Although Google has provided similar features through its Google Photos service for some time, Apple’s offering includes one feature that may appeal to many users: instead of sending photos to the cloud for analysis, Apple will use on-device intelligence to analyze and categorize photos in order to protect user privacy." The who, what, where remain on your device. You are in control. Unlike Google, Apple does not send it to the cloud for processing. "unless you want to". It is a tool. Use it or not. Apple isn't forcing it on anybody. You keep control.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 06:37 UTC

Awesome person and a great photographer. He will truly be missed.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 21:42 UTC as 126th comment
In reply to:

KonstantinosK: Come on guys, what did you expect? It's got roughly the same size as the TZ5, which had the same zoom, but with a much bigger sensor. You can't have a bright lens with such a zoom and in this size. And you can't expect the IQ to be on par with APSC when it's much smaller than m4/3. It's a small pocket camera with a 1' sensor and a 10x zoom, there's nothing like it in the market. It's a marvel that they managed to put a 1" sensor and a EVF in a camera as big as the TZ5.

Yes, It doesn't make sense.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2016 at 05:17 UTC
In reply to:

KonstantinosK: Come on guys, what did you expect? It's got roughly the same size as the TZ5, which had the same zoom, but with a much bigger sensor. You can't have a bright lens with such a zoom and in this size. And you can't expect the IQ to be on par with APSC when it's much smaller than m4/3. It's a small pocket camera with a 1' sensor and a 10x zoom, there's nothing like it in the market. It's a marvel that they managed to put a 1" sensor and a EVF in a camera as big as the TZ5.

No, one designation for the International Market and one for the North American Market. That's what happens when you let the marking folks call the shots. It would be better in my mind if there was one global name, but they caved to the North American marketers.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2016 at 02:05 UTC
In reply to:

maxnimo: People still make prints?

Seems kind of outdated and wasteful of resources considering the growing abundance of tablets and 4K TVs with superb image quality and resolution.

Ahh but prints aren't affected by a power outage. Neither are books. Technology is nice but never want to be totally dependent on it.

Link | Posted on Sep 4, 2015 at 15:05 UTC
On article Picture this: Our revamped galleries system is now live (115 comments in total)

I like it. Much better. Easier to navigate as well.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2015 at 05:21 UTC as 48th comment
Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous1234Next ›Last »