SW Anderson

Joined on Aug 14, 2011

Comments

Total: 79, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Samsung launches first removable UFS memory cards (177 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: Boycott any new card format. I see no compelling reason to change and then have confusion, high prices, and needing different cards for different f devices or brand.

@ChrisH37, to raise questions and criticize on the basis of practical concerns is not the same thing as being against progress. Neither new nor smaller necessarily qualify as better or as progress.

I could see ordering a breakfast sandwich meal at McD's and getting a golf ball-size party snack and potato morsel that would fit neatly in a teaspoon in return for my four or five bucks any time now. Things at that chain seem headed that way. That might be new, might be promo'd as healthy, but I assure you there would be no convincing me (or probably you, either) that it was progress.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2016 at 05:41 UTC
On article Samsung launches first removable UFS memory cards (177 comments in total)

I'm with photogeek. There comes a point at which miniaturization reaches diminishing returns. At that point, a camera, accessory or memory card becomes so tedious and fiddly to handle that whatever benefit its small size provides is outweighed by the nuisance factor.

Anything, even a good thing, can be overdone. I think that's what photogeek was getting at. To make out that saying enough is enough amounts to being against progress is a bogus argument. There's probably a just-right size for every individual. Overall, in the car world, a Toyota Corolla or Honda Accord is the right size for many more people than a Fiat 500. I can see many more people preferring an SD-size flash card to the micro variety, and even fewer wanting anything smaller.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2016 at 05:21 UTC as 14th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Marty4650: I think there is a practical limit to how versatile a smartphone should be. The top three functions are probably used 99% of the time. Everything else is just nice to have, and cool to show off to your friends.

I bet that JBL add on speaker costs a lot more than a much better quality JBL bluetooth speaker. And those are pretty easy to use. Almost seamless. And when was the last time you wanted to project a YouTube video on a white wall?

The advantage of the smartphone is convenience. How convenient is it to carry around a pocketful of attachments, that you may never actually need?

This reminds me of a kitchen mixer that has different attachments to turn it into a blender, food processor, chopper, meat grinder, pasta maker, and ice crusher. In every single case the dedicated device does a better job, but takes up more space in your kitchen cabinet.

Of course, I could be wrong. I have been wrong before. The marketplace will sort this one out.

What?!! No hair dryer attachment? No aromatherapy attachment? What were they thinking?

Seriouslly, Marty4650, I'm with you. A good, reliable phone with long battery life, a decent camera and reasonably fast, smooth-operating Android that's kept up to date, and I'm happy. Esoteric frill$ leave me cold. And Bluetooth or no Bluetooth, I would prefer the comparatively simple convenience of a standard headphone jack -- not something I consider a frill.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2016 at 19:03 UTC
On article Fujifilm X70 Review (370 comments in total)

Great-looking camera there. Price: $699. So, let's see . . .

"Critical detail at 100% suffers" -$50
"Waxy-looking skin in high ISO images" -$25
"AF tends to hunt" -$50
"Lens is not as high of quality as its rivals" -$100
"16MP X-Trans sensor is at the end of its life" -$25
"No viewfinder" -$150

What we have here is the equivalent of a Fiat 500L at a Subaru Impreza price. No thanks.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2016 at 04:22 UTC as 39th comment | 1 reply
On article What a view: Aukey Super Wide Angle lens quick review (64 comments in total)
In reply to:

SW Anderson: Lars Rehm, I hope you've learned a lesson. When your audience is packed with photography elitists and humorless hardware snobs, you better not review inexpensive things designed for fun. If an item's IQ can't meet the strict demands of photo editors at National Geographic or LIFE, you'll be inundated with snark and disdain.

Never mind that the cost of these lenses would alert anyone with a lick of sense that they're not "serious" photographic glass. Never mind that most who buy these lenses can get acquainted with what a fisheye or ultrawide can do, albeit without impressive sharpness. Never mind that if mounted carefully, used in bright light with suitable subjects, for display at smaller sizes online or as 4-by-6-inch prints, this lens and others like it can produce good-enough results for casual, fun-oriented snap- and selfie shooters. Apparently, those folks and the things they might enjoy aren't welcome within the IQ jihadists' jurisdiction.

M1963, thanks for pointing the way to an excellent read.

photoshack, Rehm noted and illustrated the lens' deficiencies and included its price — the highest I've seen for one of these. If you deem all that a sales pitch, steer clear of advertising or marketing jobs; you might starve.

You try to hoist me on my own petard, yet adjudge the lens "a $4 piece of crap." The irony is that one person's $4 crap is another's means of having fun, learning or indulging in artistic expression. No humorless snobbiness or elitism in your flat condemnation, though.

I suggest to you that a reasonable, non-elitist, non-snobbish response would go something like this: "Similar lenses can be had for much less. They're not for me, but to each his own."

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2016 at 05:56 UTC
On article What a view: Aukey Super Wide Angle lens quick review (64 comments in total)

Lars Rehm, I hope you've learned a lesson. When your audience is packed with photography elitists and humorless hardware snobs, you better not review inexpensive things designed for fun. If an item's IQ can't meet the strict demands of photo editors at National Geographic or LIFE, you'll be inundated with snark and disdain.

Never mind that the cost of these lenses would alert anyone with a lick of sense that they're not "serious" photographic glass. Never mind that most who buy these lenses can get acquainted with what a fisheye or ultrawide can do, albeit without impressive sharpness. Never mind that if mounted carefully, used in bright light with suitable subjects, for display at smaller sizes online or as 4-by-6-inch prints, this lens and others like it can produce good-enough results for casual, fun-oriented snap- and selfie shooters. Apparently, those folks and the things they might enjoy aren't welcome within the IQ jihadists' jurisdiction.

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2016 at 07:10 UTC as 14th comment | 5 replies
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (367 comments in total)
In reply to:

SW Anderson: I'm trying to remember ever hearing anyone long for the good old days of Super 8 movies, and drawing a blank. Even if the quoted prices are intended to be suggested list prices at introduction, soon to be brought down closer to Earth, I foresee a future of clearance shelf stacks and eBay selloffs for these things.

In a way I don't like being so negative. It would be great to see more companies trying to score successes where the competition ain't, in part by creating or re-creating niches through drawing on good ideas from the past. Even so, running something like this past some random groups of consumers and movie-making enthusiasts should be standard procedure before mass production gets under way. For example, I could see in another area where there might be an affluent enough group of people who might be willing to pay a 2016 price for a completely authentic Model T Ford or Stutz Bearcat replicar. But for a 1971 Chevy Vega? Not a chance.

I was there also and couldn't agree more. Coincidental to this Kodak announcement and the above story, I picked up a Sony CX405 video camera. It's a well-received and popular model from 2013 if I recall correctly. Pro and consumer reviews have been positive. I got it at an almost embarrassingly low closeout price — good because I don't do that much with video.

This Sony model, at a fraction of the size, weight and inflation-adjusted cost of my long-ago Super 8 camera, produces results I find impressive. Whereas, my long-ago super 8 camera left me asking, "This is it? This is all there is?" And, of course, it wasn't just the camera. The narrow, springy film itself was kind of a nuisance.

Sometimes, one can say they don't make 'em like they used to — what a relief!

Link | Posted on Jan 13, 2016 at 05:49 UTC
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (367 comments in total)

I'm trying to remember ever hearing anyone long for the good old days of Super 8 movies, and drawing a blank. Even if the quoted prices are intended to be suggested list prices at introduction, soon to be brought down closer to Earth, I foresee a future of clearance shelf stacks and eBay selloffs for these things.

In a way I don't like being so negative. It would be great to see more companies trying to score successes where the competition ain't, in part by creating or re-creating niches through drawing on good ideas from the past. Even so, running something like this past some random groups of consumers and movie-making enthusiasts should be standard procedure before mass production gets under way. For example, I could see in another area where there might be an affluent enough group of people who might be willing to pay a 2016 price for a completely authentic Model T Ford or Stutz Bearcat replicar. But for a 1971 Chevy Vega? Not a chance.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2016 at 02:01 UTC as 151st comment | 2 replies
On article Vantage Point: The aviation photography of Jon Pece (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

jorepuusa: Wonderful pictures of war planes, but where are the pictures of US military planes bombing children and other civilians to pieces? Cannot see any. Romanticizeing killing machines feels absurd.

"But my brain is able to comprehend complexities and nuances that some of your leftist brains cannot."

Leftist brain here (ahem). Weakness and lack of will to defend freedom invites aggression by those who would destroy freedom along with people who cherish and champion freedom.

Leftist, pacifist and simplemindedness are distinctly different things. ;)

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2015 at 23:48 UTC
On article Vantage Point: The aviation photography of Jon Pece (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

tmurph: These are stunning air to air shots of military aircraft, yes they are used and have been used to bomb and destroy lives but such is the nature of these machines ( if nature is the right word) to be used in anger when the need arises.
Remember, this is a camera and photography site not a political sounding board.
By the way, those incredible photographic tools we all use contain electronics that were first tried in military hardware.

"How about we just throw them all away to the landfill of history and live happily ever after?"

How about you taking that suggestion to Russia, China, North Korea and across the Middle East, and get back to us with the responses?

Universal peace would be wonderful. So would freedom from crime. Maybe if we were to fire all of law enforcement, the criminals would all decide to become honest as the day is long.

Really, Big One, you need a remedial course in logic.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2015 at 09:05 UTC
On article Vantage Point: The aviation photography of Jon Pece (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

zakk9: The correct title of this should be "Vantage Point: The military aircraft photography of Jon Pece". No, I don't care much for glorifying photos of military equipment used for unprovoked attacks on other nations, resulting in millions of innocent deads, damaged lives, refugees etc. Some call it "collateral damage", but it's murder, plain and simple.

My comment to you was judgmental and harsh based on your being off topic and your sweeping condemnation of a few thousand people you've never met. The great majority of the people you slammed are well educated, exceptionally well trained, highly disciplined and serving our country, sometimes in deadly dangerous circumstances. They are not homicidal maniacs who get off on killing whoever, wherever.

The core of all bigotry is a notion, "they're all alike." Conclusion jumping, as in, " There's also quite some hypocrisy in a photo of a man who says he loves his wife and flies to kill someone else's family," is the trademark of an ignorant blowhard.

There's a compelling case to be made that Pece and others like him fly to keep a whole lot of families from being killed.

As for being able to take differing opinions, I have much less problem with them when they're factual, logical and dispensed in appropriate places.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2015 at 08:49 UTC
On article Vantage Point: The aviation photography of Jon Pece (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

zakk9: The correct title of this should be "Vantage Point: The military aircraft photography of Jon Pece". No, I don't care much for glorifying photos of military equipment used for unprovoked attacks on other nations, resulting in millions of innocent deads, damaged lives, refugees etc. Some call it "collateral damage", but it's murder, plain and simple.

What part of this comment has anything to do with photos or things related? How many of today's pilots have you interviewed at length in coming up with your judgment they're "frighteningly stupid?"

I've seen a rare few comments from overbearing, know-it-all trolls and ignoramuses on dpreview, but this from you is the worst.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2015 at 05:31 UTC
On article Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses (169 comments in total)

A note for Damien Demolder and others who write for Dpreview. Please, when you use acronyms like PDAF, always spell them out as words on first reference, followed by the acronym in parentheses. Dpreview is a site frequented by enthusiasts and pro's, but I doubt you want newbies to feel like laymen at a trial lawyers' convention ("Mens rea; in pari delicto — say what?")

I had to stop on "PDAF" and try to come up with the most likely meaning I could think of given the context: phase-detect automatic focus. Good, clear writing, especially of a technical nature, doesn't challenge readers to intuit what's being said throughout a minefield of acronyms and jargon.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2015 at 06:29 UTC as 50th comment
On article Field Test: Sigma 19mm, 30mm and 60mm F2.8 DN lenses (169 comments in total)
In reply to:

SeeRoy: These are daft focal lengths for MFT application since they more or less duplicate existing, reasonably priced equivalents (in many cases faster) from other brands - notably Olympus and Panasonic themselves.
Why "deceptively pleasing"? Are they in reality repulsive? Do explain.

Mr. Macedo's comment comes across as an exercise in thinking inside the box. These micro four thirds lenses are what they are. I went a long time in the film days thinking the "standard" 50mm lens was somewhat tight and constraining for my taste. When I got hold of a 40mm pancake lens, I was delighted with the modest additional breadth of view. I expect some others would feel the wider view was too roomy for their taste. A cada uno lo suyo.

Sigma is providing micro four thirds enthusiasts with additional choices at affordable prices. To my mind, that can only be a good thing.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2015 at 06:03 UTC
On article Nikon Coolpix A comparative review (16 comments in total)

In the spirit of constructive criticism, I sought in vain some mention about the LCD's usability outdoors in sunlight. (If I missed this, please tell me where in the review it's located.) I think LCD performance is especially important in a pocketable, take-wherever camera -- whose manufacturer charges a whopping $450 for a shoe-mount optical viewfinder. (For that kind of money, Nikon should build a top-plate replacement with built-in rangefinder, IMO.)

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2015 at 05:00 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply
On article Hands-on with Canon's 'not-coming-to-USA' EOS M3 (598 comments in total)

The design looks well thought out and the size decent. Should have built-in EVF or a very affordable add on EVF.

I wonder why Canon is shunning the U.S. market when it comes to its lone mirrorless model. Competition too tough? Stung by less-than-stellar reviews of the first model? Afraid of cannibalizing DSLR sales? Seems as though U.S. photography enthusiasts deserve the courtesy of an explanation, at least.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 06:49 UTC as 161st comment | 3 replies
On article HTC introduces the RE digital camera (102 comments in total)

My reaction is mixed. In a field with an awful lot of me-tooism in play at all times, I have to hand it to HTC for a "hit 'em where they ain't." approach. The extreme wide FOV could be fun in the right circumstances. Given it's toy-like limitations, the RE's price isn't completely outrageous.

Then again, I have to wonder how quickly buyers will get past the experimenting stage and put the RE on a shelf near the Pet Rock and Rubik's Cube.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2014 at 21:21 UTC as 41st comment
On article Ricoh expands Q series with Pentax Q-S1 (366 comments in total)
In reply to:

datiswous: I think not able to use a viewfinder (internal or via add-on) on a system camera kind of sucks, even if 80% of potential buyers won't need it. Even on high-end compacts this becomes kind of standard.

@le alain, I have presbyopia and wear glasses. I need dioptric adjustment on EVF's. The large-ish Pentax Q OVF is comfortable to use with glasses on, unlike my cameras with EVF. You might find it usable after all.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 06:22 UTC
Total: 79, showing: 1 – 20
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