misolo

Lives in United States NC, United States
Joined on Mar 1, 2009

Comments

Total: 409, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Fotogeneticist: We need to stop using the term "mirrorless" to name these latest cameras. Imagine if we called cars "horseless carriages". The image follows a different path from the scene to the sensor to the finder. We used to call cameras with two lenses Twin Lens Reflex. Then Hasselblad ushered in the Single Lens Reflex. I propose Digital Sensor Reflex (DSR). The image goes directly to the sensor through the lens and the sensor "reflexes" the image to the finder. TLR --> SLR --> DSLR --> DSR.

steelhead3: It's already the case that cameras with mirrors are designated based on that. That's what the R (for reflex) in SLR and DSLR means: the reflection of an image in a mirror.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 18:04 UTC
In reply to:

left eye: Changing lenses on a mirror-less camera without a focal-place shutter, in my experience introduces dust to the sensor with alarming regularity.

With a sensor this big, dust will be 'a subject', as will the safe regular perfect cleaning of such an expensive sensor - without damaging it. I'm getting nervous just thinking about it!

If you look inside, I believe many (most?) mirrorless cameras keep the shutter open when you're changing lenses. Maybe because it's better for shutter durability to have the spring without tension by default, maybe because it's actually much easier to damage a mechanical shutter (a delicate precision mechanism) by touching it accidentally than it is to damage the very hard glass on top of the optical stack in front of the sensor.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 15:13 UTC
In reply to:

Fotogeneticist: We need to stop using the term "mirrorless" to name these latest cameras. Imagine if we called cars "horseless carriages". The image follows a different path from the scene to the sensor to the finder. We used to call cameras with two lenses Twin Lens Reflex. Then Hasselblad ushered in the Single Lens Reflex. I propose Digital Sensor Reflex (DSR). The image goes directly to the sensor through the lens and the sensor "reflexes" the image to the finder. TLR --> SLR --> DSLR --> DSR.

The "reflex" in TLR and SLR refers precisely to the mirror. Hint: a mirror reflects light. And yes, TLRs also had (fixed) mirrors in their viewfinders. For decades we used the term SLR, and the "single lens" part of the name didn't make sense either except in the context of previous cameras that had two lenses. I'm not a big fan of "mirrorless" either, and something like "Digital Finder Camera" might make more sense, but at this point it's moot: "mirrorless" is in general use and here to stay.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 15:07 UTC
In reply to:

Random Photographer: It costs GBP. 160 (~$200 USD) to get rid of the Leica logo... Let that sink in.

Dr_Jon: I don't think it's quite that. This would be like Porsche charging money for leaving out a default option, even though it saves them money to do so (e.g., don't have to pay Bosch for the part).

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 12:37 UTC
In reply to:

Random Photographer: It costs GBP. 160 (~$200 USD) to get rid of the Leica logo... Let that sink in.

For those who didn't visit the website: this is not a joke. Leica actually charges an additional 200 bucks in order to skip the step of gluing the red dot sticker to the camera.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 08:52 UTC
In reply to:

starwolfy: I am wondering why Leica emphasize so much the Summarit line on their product pictures.
I have noticed we see a lot of body pictures with the 50 or 35 summarit lens which is to me a bit akward since it is probably not the "sexiest" lenses in the Leica line and in fact their entry level products.

When they're trying to sell you the camera, they want you to be able to see it -- hence putting a smaller lens on it.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 08:43 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)
In reply to:

Light Pilgrim: DPREVIEW TEAM, just wanted to let you know that when I see other people reply to my posts and click on the direct link which should lead me to the post, I am being transfered to a main page of the article. Impossible to find the post without it, a pain really. I am using it on an iPhone 6s, latest iOS.

I am alone?

Same here. Only solution until they fix it (though it's been like this for ages) is to search for your username in the page, every browser has a within-page search function. If you don't find it, it's because it has scrolled down to the second page of comments.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 05:01 UTC

At this point you have three devices, made by three different companies, physically attached together but nevertheless communicating over a wireless protocol that, albeit now well standardized, was originally developed by a fourth company. It will surely be a smooth user experience, what could possibly wrong.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 18:31 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply

Does anyone know whether this is in preparation to discontinuing development and support? They're still great tools.

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2016 at 08:59 UTC as 112th comment | 4 replies
On article How to: iFixit disassembles the Fujifilm X100T (102 comments in total)

That's one smudgy fingerprint in slide 9.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2016 at 12:29 UTC as 45th comment
In reply to:

mike80: I'm happy that Sigma is again offering a large aperture telephoto zoom lens for APS-C users, but haven't decided whether I should try to find a copy of Sigma's older 50-150mm f/2.8 OS lens rather than buying this new lens.

The new lens has a shorter zoom range and lacks the stabilization of the 50-150mm f/2.8 OS, but has a larger f/1.8 maximum aperture.

50mm f/1.8 prime lenses are cheap and plentiful, and 85mm f/1.8 lenses, while less common, are still very affordable. What makes this new lens special, aside from having an f/1.8 max. aperture at all focal lengths, is it's f/1.8 max. aperture at 100mm.

Using an online depth of field calculator, I found that at 100mm and f/1.8, if I focused on a subject 10ft away, I'd have about 2.5in of depth of field to work with. At f/2.8 and the same subject distance, I'd have about 4in of depth of field.

What is the practical usefulness of a 50-100mm f/1.8 lens given the limited depth of field at 100mm versus having OS and the 100-150mm range?

mike80: It's great that you have your own style and aesthetic preferences (and, to be honest, I don't do ultra-shallow depth of field as often as I used to -- though I like having the option to do it now and then), but that doesn't mean it doesn't have any "practical usefulness", as you put it, for many others who have different preferences.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2016 at 07:05 UTC
In reply to:

mike80: I'm happy that Sigma is again offering a large aperture telephoto zoom lens for APS-C users, but haven't decided whether I should try to find a copy of Sigma's older 50-150mm f/2.8 OS lens rather than buying this new lens.

The new lens has a shorter zoom range and lacks the stabilization of the 50-150mm f/2.8 OS, but has a larger f/1.8 maximum aperture.

50mm f/1.8 prime lenses are cheap and plentiful, and 85mm f/1.8 lenses, while less common, are still very affordable. What makes this new lens special, aside from having an f/1.8 max. aperture at all focal lengths, is it's f/1.8 max. aperture at 100mm.

Using an online depth of field calculator, I found that at 100mm and f/1.8, if I focused on a subject 10ft away, I'd have about 2.5in of depth of field to work with. At f/2.8 and the same subject distance, I'd have about 4in of depth of field.

What is the practical usefulness of a 50-100mm f/1.8 lens given the limited depth of field at 100mm versus having OS and the 100-150mm range?

...adding: I do portraits with the 135/2, which would be 90/1.4 on APS-C. You do have to be careful with how you use the depth of field, but when it works it's lovely.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 18:55 UTC
In reply to:

mike80: I'm happy that Sigma is again offering a large aperture telephoto zoom lens for APS-C users, but haven't decided whether I should try to find a copy of Sigma's older 50-150mm f/2.8 OS lens rather than buying this new lens.

The new lens has a shorter zoom range and lacks the stabilization of the 50-150mm f/2.8 OS, but has a larger f/1.8 maximum aperture.

50mm f/1.8 prime lenses are cheap and plentiful, and 85mm f/1.8 lenses, while less common, are still very affordable. What makes this new lens special, aside from having an f/1.8 max. aperture at all focal lengths, is it's f/1.8 max. aperture at 100mm.

Using an online depth of field calculator, I found that at 100mm and f/1.8, if I focused on a subject 10ft away, I'd have about 2.5in of depth of field to work with. At f/2.8 and the same subject distance, I'd have about 4in of depth of field.

What is the practical usefulness of a 50-100mm f/1.8 lens given the limited depth of field at 100mm versus having OS and the 100-150mm range?

People pay good money for the 85L to shoot portraits. To get that angle of view and depth of field on APS-C you'd need 56mm f/0.8! Likewise, the f/2.8 zoom (and fixed focal length) lenses are very popular for sports on full frame. They have the same depth of field as this zoom on APS-C.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 18:51 UTC
In reply to:

mike80: I'm happy that Sigma is again offering a large aperture telephoto zoom lens for APS-C users, but haven't decided whether I should try to find a copy of Sigma's older 50-150mm f/2.8 OS lens rather than buying this new lens.

The new lens has a shorter zoom range and lacks the stabilization of the 50-150mm f/2.8 OS, but has a larger f/1.8 maximum aperture.

50mm f/1.8 prime lenses are cheap and plentiful, and 85mm f/1.8 lenses, while less common, are still very affordable. What makes this new lens special, aside from having an f/1.8 max. aperture at all focal lengths, is it's f/1.8 max. aperture at 100mm.

Using an online depth of field calculator, I found that at 100mm and f/1.8, if I focused on a subject 10ft away, I'd have about 2.5in of depth of field to work with. At f/2.8 and the same subject distance, I'd have about 4in of depth of field.

What is the practical usefulness of a 50-100mm f/1.8 lens given the limited depth of field at 100mm versus having OS and the 100-150mm range?

Pro-tips: 1) many people buy wide aperture lenses precisely to get that narrow depth of field (hint: portraits); 2) many others shoot subjects significantly farther away than that, can't rely on image stabilization, need all the shutter speed they can get (hint: indoor sports).

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 18:07 UTC
In reply to:

Hugo808: Puny focal range, too heavy and no IS! It's hardly a winner from my perspective but the speed will have people running for it in droves.

As the differences in reach is so feeble surely we'd all be much better off with a 75mm?

Or get the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 A, for half the weight and 2/3 of the price, and crop as needed. It'll be a bit worse than the zoom towards 100, a bit better towards 50. And it's compatible with full-frame cameras. This is still a really interesting zoom but, if I was using APS-C, I'd find it very hard to justify.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 11:23 UTC
On article Ona launches Clifton leather backpack (120 comments in total)

USD 500. This comments thread is going to be fun.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2016 at 14:36 UTC as 37th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

cityofdust: I would love buy a canon but cameras are ugly and sony cameras are ugly too but sony has the better sounding numbers.

wish for more retro style and canon could make use of there history.

But Canon has always been up to date with design, occasionally pushing boundaries. What you think now as 'classic' designs were novel and modern at the time. Coming out with a 'retro' model would be a violation of their history.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2016 at 10:17 UTC

Comments sections whenever a camera gets released in anything other than black are the best entertainment.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromophobia

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2016 at 09:57 UTC as 27th comment
In reply to:

iShootWideOpen: 50, 50, 50. The 50mm is just as intimate but doesn't introduce the ugly distortion. The 35mm is great for candids and environmental portraits at a distance.

Rishi -- Try picking up a medium sized object, say a coffee mug (I'm doing this right now with a Rubik's cube). Put it at about 20 cm from your eyes, and try with different angles. Look at it with either eye closed, and then with both eyes open. When one eye is closed you should experience seeing it as a wide angle lens would render it. With both eyes open, you should experience seeing it with a surprisingly flat perspective. But visual perception is indeed a far more complicated thing that we are aware of, and there probably are big differences from person to person.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2016 at 09:49 UTC
In reply to:

iShootWideOpen: 50, 50, 50. The 50mm is just as intimate but doesn't introduce the ugly distortion. The 35mm is great for candids and environmental portraits at a distance.

"the slight amounts of barrel distortion that I find pleasing because loved ones I view up close also have that level of barrel distortion" -- this is not quite true regarding how most people's visual perception works. Unless you always close one eye whenever you get very close to your loved ones (maybe Rishi does?...), for close-up objects our brain takes the two images from each eye and processes away the perspective. I think this is why to many (most?) people it's the very long focal lengths (200mm+) that are perceived as strangely intimate -- because they sort of replicate (without the stereoscopic processing) how we perceive very up-close objects.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2016 at 15:02 UTC
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