viewfindr2

viewfindr2

Lives in Canada Toronto, Canada
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at www.tomfreda.com
Joined on Feb 20, 2016
About me:

Instagram:
Landscapes & Travel: @tom_freda_photo
B&W street: @viewfinder_bw
Colour street: @viewfinder_clr
Infrared: @viewfinder_ir

Comments

Total: 26, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

viewfindr2: I suspect this announcement coincides with the Dec 31 closure of Trinitek Electronics Inc., the only authorized repair facility for Olympus in Canada. Canadian repairs now have to be sent to the US.

Possibly it's part of a downsizing effort?

I contacted Olympus' head office to find out who'll replace them. This is the answer I got:

--------------

Thank you for contacting Olympus.

Regrettably, we no longer have a repair center in Canada. Here are the instructions to send the camera to New Jersey for repair.

Please go to #2 at the following link to create your repair request:

learnandsupport.getolympus.com/ca-en/repair

We do apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Regards,

Customer Care and Support
OMD Solutions Corp

I guess that's a possibility. It would also make sense that they'd suffer a huge downturn in clients. Either way, we're stuck with mailing our cameras to New Jersey ... at least until until Olympus finds a new repair facility.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2021 at 00:35 UTC
In reply to:

viewfindr2: I suspect this announcement coincides with the Dec 31 closure of Trinitek Electronics Inc., the only authorized repair facility for Olympus in Canada. Canadian repairs now have to be sent to the US.

Possibly it's part of a downsizing effort?

I contacted Olympus' head office to find out who'll replace them. This is the answer I got:

--------------

Thank you for contacting Olympus.

Regrettably, we no longer have a repair center in Canada. Here are the instructions to send the camera to New Jersey for repair.

Please go to #2 at the following link to create your repair request:

learnandsupport.getolympus.com/ca-en/repair

We do apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Regards,

Customer Care and Support
OMD Solutions Corp

I don't know if they did other repairs. All I know is that they fixed a 12-40mm for me a few years ago and their closure coincides with the Japan Industrial Partners announcement. Within 4 days, actually. The announcement was Jan 4 and Trinitek's last day of business was Dec 31. That can't be coincidence.

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2021 at 00:07 UTC

I suspect this announcement coincides with the Dec 31 closure of Trinitek Electronics Inc., the only authorized repair facility for Olympus in Canada. Canadian repairs now have to be sent to the US.

Possibly it's part of a downsizing effort?

I contacted Olympus' head office to find out who'll replace them. This is the answer I got:

--------------

Thank you for contacting Olympus.

Regrettably, we no longer have a repair center in Canada. Here are the instructions to send the camera to New Jersey for repair.

Please go to #2 at the following link to create your repair request:

learnandsupport.getolympus.com/ca-en/repair

We do apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Regards,

Customer Care and Support
OMD Solutions Corp

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2021 at 12:30 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

BobT3218: I'm sure this is a wonderful lens but I always shake my head when I see the name Cosina. I once has a Cosina CS-1, a 35mm film SLR. Worst gear I ever owned but then I guess they all have to start somewhere.

I think you're overlooking one huge thing: ALL Japanese cameras were "budget" alternatives to the German brands. Basically, they made cheap rip-off copies of Leica, Contax and Zeiss designs. Today, they produce high end products - as does Cosina. The only difference is the timeline.

Regardless, Cosina's cameras and lenses were respectable from the very beginning, and got better as technology permitted. If they weren't, I doubt you would have seen their products branded as Contax, Zeiss Ikon, Voigtlander, Nikon, Olympus, Konica, Minolta or Yashica models - or those from a half dozen other camera companies from the sixties to the 2000s, when they needed to contract out to save costs.

It's not a new, revolutionary concept. It's done today by all the major electronics and optics companies. Apple, maker of the most popular camera in the world (iPhone), makes its products in China by Foxconn.

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2020 at 23:13 UTC
In reply to:

BobT3218: I'm sure this is a wonderful lens but I always shake my head when I see the name Cosina. I once has a Cosina CS-1, a 35mm film SLR. Worst gear I ever owned but then I guess they all have to start somewhere.

And further proof that the 50mm F1.7 Cosinon lens is no slouch, here are some photos taken with it on mirrorless digital cameras. Seems like it has a bit of a following:

https://www.flickr.com/search/?text=50mm%20F1.7%20Cosinon

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2020 at 14:05 UTC
In reply to:

BobT3218: I'm sure this is a wonderful lens but I always shake my head when I see the name Cosina. I once has a Cosina CS-1, a 35mm film SLR. Worst gear I ever owned but then I guess they all have to start somewhere.

>> "The lens was awful."

You must have had a bad one if it was that noticeable. I remember the cameras (also sold under the Petri name) as adequately-built, reliable, and cheap. The lenses were OK. Not as good as today, but certainly not like you describe. I still see the lenses and cameras on eBay once in a while.

Even back in the thirties, 50mm was not a difficult lens to make well. Even Russian Zenit lenses weren't terrible - although I wouldn't have been caught dead using one back when they were sold. Turns out, they actually aren't as bad as I thought. I just bought one to use on M4/3.

If you're interested in checking; this review has the Cosina / Petri 50mm F1.7 NMC Cosinon lens you had rated as 8/10. For comparison, the same site rates the Carl Zeiss Planar T* 50mm f/1.4 Contax C/Y at 8.33:
https://www.pentaxforums.com/userreviews/cosina-50mm-f1-7-nmc-cosinon.html

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2020 at 14:00 UTC
In reply to:

BobT3218: I'm sure this is a wonderful lens but I always shake my head when I see the name Cosina. I once has a Cosina CS-1, a 35mm film SLR. Worst gear I ever owned but then I guess they all have to start somewhere.

Cosina's origins humble? They've been making optics since 1959. In 1959, Sony was making cheap transistor radios. THAT"S humble. :-)

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2020 at 08:57 UTC

No rangefinder coupling for Leica M mount? Why even bother to make it in that mount then? They're shutting out at least half of all Leica users.

Even Chinese TTArtisan makes rangefinder-coupled lenses for Leica.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2020 at 03:49 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

Tim Zhou: Love that 'panda' looking lens, the best of both worlds :)

The overall design is owefully similar to Zeiss ZM sonar 50mm f1.5

Probably no coincidence, since Cosina also makes the Zeiss lenses in the same factory.

My Zeiss 35mm Biogon and Voigtlander 21mm Skopar both look near identical on the outside. Same finish, lettering and numbers. Even the font is the same.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2020 at 03:41 UTC
In reply to:

AndrewG38: To each their own but ... the bokeh in that first portrait is terrible.

Just like HDR and Instagram filters, Bokeh is an overdone fad that'll be gone in 5 years. In my opinion, it won't be too soon.

And photographers *do* use lenses for things other than portraits, you know.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2020 at 03:36 UTC
In reply to:

LFPCPH: What is "Vessa" ?

It's Bessa. It's spelled correctly in the next sentence. It's Cosina's now discontinued Leica thread and M-mount line of Voigtlander rangefinders.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2020 at 03:32 UTC
In reply to:

Mortal Lion: minimum focus distance 70cm.. I'm out.

>> "Ok rangefinders suck then"

Only in the hands of people who need auto-everything in order to get a properly focused/exposed photo. Rangefinders are for people who know what they're doing.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2020 at 03:30 UTC
In reply to:

BobT3218: I'm sure this is a wonderful lens but I always shake my head when I see the name Cosina. I once has a Cosina CS-1, a 35mm film SLR. Worst gear I ever owned but then I guess they all have to start somewhere.

I think you both need to update your knowledge of Cosina. They also produce Zeiss lenses under license (some of which rival Leica's in performance), as well as a full line of their own Voigtlander lenses. Also Rollei's, back when they branded a Cosina built rangefinder.

They also had their own line of Voigtlander Leica-M mount rangefinders, and produced Zeiss Ikon rangefinders.

I use a Cosina-made Carl Zeiss Biogon 35mm f/2.8 on my Leica and Voigtlander R2A that's the sharpest lens I've ever used.

And, my Cosina-made Voigtlander 21mm f/4 blows Leica's 21mm f/4 out of the water in sharpness.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2020 at 03:24 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Scan film negatives with the Nikon ES-2 (279 comments in total)
In reply to:

viewfindr2: Since buying the ES-2 to use with my D850, I've stopped scanning 35mm on my Nikon Super Coolscan 8000ED.

It wasn't a difficult decision. A fraction of the time, and a 47MP file versus 16MP. The scanner does only 6x6 and 6x7 now.

If I remove the 35mm slide mount and scan with a custom-made mount that goes right to the edge of the frame, I can get a 21MP file from my 8000ED scanner, not 24MP.

Regardless, rezzing up a scan that size to 47MP loses detail. Then there's the CCD noise on the scanner that you don't get with a camera copy, and the added DR and versatility of a raw file.

Add all that up (plus the speed advantage) and the ES-2/D850 digitizer is still far better than any scan. I know because I've compared them side by side.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2020 at 01:52 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Scan film negatives with the Nikon ES-2 (279 comments in total)

Since buying the ES-2 to use with my D850, I've stopped scanning 35mm on my Nikon Super Coolscan 8000ED.

It wasn't a difficult decision. A fraction of the time, and a 47MP file versus 16MP. The scanner does only 6x6 and 6x7 now.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2020 at 09:30 UTC as 44th comment | 7 replies

Well, photographers have had to endure clients who expect to use images for free, to now requiring *us* to pay for being in print! The only reason this behavior exists is because photographers let them. As a result, any photographer I know who abides by this abusive policy immediately loses my respect - and I'll tell them to their face, if I can.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2018 at 04:14 UTC as 9th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Kashim: I wish people would stop bringing up the Betamax vs VHS debacle every time they see two competing technologies. I will not get into the details here, but the fight between XQD and CFexpress has absolutely no similarities to Betamax vs VHS. Just as it has no similiarites to cassettes vs 8track, or whatever ancient technology battle you may vaguely recall from your childhood.

Actually, there is a similarity between Betamax and VHS. Before it becomes a monopoly, a proprietary Sony technology is being usurped by a better and more universal technology.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2018 at 22:56 UTC
On article Panasonic G9 added to studio scene comparison (166 comments in total)
In reply to:

simpleshot: Too noisy for my taste, even when compared against older cameras.

http://i64.tinypic.com/ny8ti8.png

LOL! My how spoiled we've become! First, how often do you *really* shoot at ISO3200? And second, you're comparing it to cameras with full-frame sensors double the size, weight and cost!

No offence, but just to give you a dose of reality, when I started photography in the 70s, right up to the 90s, my favorite film was Kodachrome 25. K64 was my second choice. Both were almost exclusively used by National Geographic and Life Magazine photographers with always stunning results. ISO3200 was utterly unheard of. In fact, ISO400 was pretty well the ceiling for color, and it was an extremely rare situation when that was needed. Above all, no one ever bitched about not being able to shoot at ISO3200!

20mp Micro Four Thirds blows 35mm film out of the water. Even my 12mp Olympus sensors exceed film. If you want to lug around 50 pounds of full frame bodies and lenses just for low noise ISO3200 shooting, knock yourself out!

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2017 at 05:43 UTC
On article Panasonic G9 added to studio scene comparison (166 comments in total)

I notice you have a Standard and E-Shutter drop-down box in your comparison tool. But why don't you show Low settings in the ISO box? I know extended low ISO is not the same as base, but there are clear IQ benefits that need to be shown. That's why camera manufactures offer that feature.

With my Olympus PEN-F, I shoot at Low (ISO80) all the time, and unlike at the base ISO200, in non-contrasty light, it's noticeably sharper and noise free.

I feel that image quality advantage is lost in your comparison tool - which would show the minor loss of dynamic range (if it matters to them), but give viewers a more complete review of what the camera is fully capable of.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 20:39 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

d2f: Chances are once you stop this lens down to 5.6 or 8.0 most experts will not be able to tell it apart from the Zeiss equivalent. Even at wide open most people, including myself, will not be able to tell them apart, especially if corrected by Lightroom. Given that is the case the only issue will be how well it plays on the Sony camera and that remains to be seen. Assuming there are no glaring issues I will buy it. In my opinion, it complements the a7s attributes of small size and light weight.

lawny13... Are you familiar with diffraction? Smaller apertures do not equate better sharpness.

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2017 at 16:00 UTC
Total: 26, showing: 1 – 20
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