PinnyHead

Joined on Dec 4, 2018

Comments

Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

jhorse: Voting for non-digital cameras for beginners, especially when beginners are more likely to be of the younger generation, in digital era seems pointless and irrelevant.

Besides the experience, film offers different opportunities for creativity and expression. As someone who learned photography as a kid on an OM-1, I also believe there is no better way to understand the applied science of photography than to use manual, analog gear. I may not have bought a roll of film in over a decade, but I wouldn’t know half of what I do without those rolls of Kodak and Fujifilm.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2020 at 01:09 UTC
In reply to:

xeppelin: none of the cameras on the list ate good beginner cameras.

But a Canon EOS 30 is. Got mine for € 40 in near mint condition. built after 2000. AF and user interface like Canon DSLRs and all Canon EF lenses work natively on it. not some manual focus clunker from the 1970s.

It seems like this article could be a good start to a series. While this mix of old and new features is a good solution for many (film) beginners, there are likely many who are just getting interested in pre-digital tech that would like more or less electronic magic.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2020 at 00:47 UTC
In reply to:

Razor512: Can you trade in a cheap point and shoot camera just to get the $100 discount?

Not sure what kind of trade-in value you’d get, but there is nothing that says you can’t trade in a Kodak Fun Saver and get the extra $100...

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 03:06 UTC
In reply to:

PinnyHead: Nikon is underestimating how many people are sticking with their F mount bodies due to a lack of 3rd party lens compatibility with the FTZ adapter.

It is, but the list of incompatible lenses is much longer

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 02:02 UTC

Nikon is underestimating how many people are sticking with their F mount bodies due to a lack of 3rd party lens compatibility with the FTZ adapter.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 01:17 UTC as 42nd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Mitrajoon: Too bad they haven't listened to customers and folks like Thom Hogan who have repeatedly exhorted them to come into the 21st century and improve the usability of their cameras rather than focusing on cramming more pixels into their sensors. Ironically, improving their UI's would probably be a lot cheaper than redesigning and manufacturing new hardware.

Those points are exactly why I would like to see Samsung make another go of it. They did amazing things with NX, but they did not have the patience (and/or business sense) to slog through the difficult process of getting millions of people to buy in to a new system from a new ILC manufacturer. The existence of an existing base of users, existing base of products, and existing R&D could really make a difference.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2020 at 18:58 UTC
In reply to:

Mitrajoon: Too bad they haven't listened to customers and folks like Thom Hogan who have repeatedly exhorted them to come into the 21st century and improve the usability of their cameras rather than focusing on cramming more pixels into their sensors. Ironically, improving their UI's would probably be a lot cheaper than redesigning and manufacturing new hardware.

I’m not typically a fan of Samsung products, but I think it would be good for the industry if they were to purchase the next camera business to come up for sale. It would be great to see what they would do with an existing customer base

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2020 at 05:18 UTC
In reply to:

Mitrajoon: Too bad they haven't listened to customers and folks like Thom Hogan who have repeatedly exhorted them to come into the 21st century and improve the usability of their cameras rather than focusing on cramming more pixels into their sensors. Ironically, improving their UI's would probably be a lot cheaper than redesigning and manufacturing new hardware.

The hardware buttons/dials and software quick menus on my E-M5ii are excellent, but the full software menu can be a bit of a labyrinth. Sounds like Olympus has streamlined a bit with the newest releases...hope they can spread it to some of the older models also

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2020 at 02:03 UTC
In reply to:

Dibyendu Majumdar: I think that the camera industry is just right-sizing.
To get an idea of what sales used to be like before the digital boom have a look at http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html. You will see even today more lenses are sold in a year than used to be over the whole lifetime of a lens.

So to put things into perspective, the inflated sales during the digital boom was the anomaly.

The camera bubble a decade ago did indeed skew everyone’s expectations...including those of the manufacturers themselves. Unfortunately R&D and manufacturing costs have likely increased significantly from the pre-bubble days...so contracting is not just painful for some, but impossible without convergence.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 17:44 UTC
In reply to:

I have a dream: There was a time where Apple was a trendsetter.
Now they just wait and copy what Android phones do.
Large screens, several cameras, computational photography, periscope zooms...
I think the last time they really created something on the iPhone was that ugly notch.

Several (but admittedly not all) of those issues were primarily issues in the news rather than actual use. iPhone 4 was far from the first or last phone to lose signal if you squeezed the antennas. I don’t recall the “purple flare” issue of the 5. iPhone 6: people were surprised you couldn’t sit on a phone constantly. iOS 6 Maps (assuming “Plans” was an autocorrect issue) was a debacle—I still don’t use Apple Maps despite Google harvesting my data on their apps). Siri was the leader in voice assistance...when it debuted...they have indeed squandered that lead and need to innovate more.

So, while they do have their missteps and areas where they do need to compete better...many of these fall into the category of “clickbait crisis”

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 17:29 UTC
In reply to:

Mitrajoon: Too bad they haven't listened to customers and folks like Thom Hogan who have repeatedly exhorted them to come into the 21st century and improve the usability of their cameras rather than focusing on cramming more pixels into their sensors. Ironically, improving their UI's would probably be a lot cheaper than redesigning and manufacturing new hardware.

I find it stunning how poorly every camera company markets to new or novice users. There is not a single manufacturer website that has a clear, easy to navigate “system builder.”
I bet many have had the same experience as I: a friend or family member finally understands the advantages a dedicated camera offers over their phone. They commit to spending the money, they go online or in-store to see what they like...and they are completely confused by the plethora of bodies and lenses. Whereas Apple or Samsung have simple to understand branding for new features...new camera buyers are treated to spec sheets. While great for those who are already waist-deep in camera tech; the basic shopping tools leave far too many would-be photographers confused, intimidated, and unable to make an informed decision about what gear is best for them. So, they either get a $400 basic body with a kit lens and wonder why they aren’t getting National Geographic-quality bird photos...or stick to their phone.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2020 at 17:17 UTC
In reply to:

I have a dream: There was a time where Apple was a trendsetter.
Now they just wait and copy what Android phones do.
Large screens, several cameras, computational photography, periscope zooms...
I think the last time they really created something on the iPhone was that ugly notch.

Most of the “Android first” features listed by @Arsalaan and @Ihaveadream also were responsible for the atrocious battery life and security exploits the have plagued Android since it was first created as an iOS clone. Things like “lots of RAM” were a response to bloated code and poor resource management. Big batteries were a response to all that RAM, as well as poor permissions implementation that allow any app to continue running in the background while consuming as many system resources as they wish. I don’t deny that the commoditization of Android phones and tablets sometimes brings about innovation...but those “innovations” are often gimmicks that do not push tech forward, or bandages over existing self-inflicted wounds. Apple is far from perfect, but at least when they do something, they do it right (except for butterfly keyboards).

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2020 at 19:11 UTC
In reply to:

PinnyHead: Has anyone seen reliability data for the Android phones that have been shipping with periscope lenses? Even with a case, your average phone is exposed to a lot of shock over its life. The introduction of moving parts seems like a risky move if not done really well.

I am pretty sure DPR staff know the difference between zoom and telephoto 😉. As other have pointed out, Apple isn’t necessarily the first with new tech, but they generally do it best. Having a massive jump between equivalent fixed focal lengths and trying to fill in the gaps with digital zoom does not seem like an Apple solution. It is one thing to do it when going from 14mm-28mm-50mm...throw in a 200mm (for example) and computational photography suddenly has a lot more work to do.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2020 at 18:56 UTC
In reply to:

beatboxa: The 90's are back. And this shows just how much further ahead (in terms of technology) Ricoh is than the rest.

Think about it: They actually sent someone back in time to the 90's to design this camera to look like all of the cameras back then. The colors, shapes--everything. Just type "90s camera" in Google, and you'll see that this is clearly an authentic 90's design.

And yet somehow, they were able to merge that 90's design with 2017 technology.

I don't think any other brand is capable of this advanced time-travelling technology. Well done.

Does this have dual micro-cassette slots?

Looking cheap is late 90’s consumer electronics retro. Silver plastic camera bodies are known to perform best when connected to a bondi blue iMac. Just be sure to back up your photos on a zip disk!

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2020 at 18:43 UTC

Has anyone seen reliability data for the Android phones that have been shipping with periscope lenses? Even with a case, your average phone is exposed to a lot of shock over its life. The introduction of moving parts seems like a risky move if not done really well.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2020 at 16:46 UTC as 28th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

AriesII: Meh... 1.7x crop and not flippable/rotating screen. Not sure who this camera is for. Its 2020, and the specs are 2017. Not going to be a great seller.

It’s for the millions of F-mount owners who want to move to FF mirrorless, but can only justify spending so much. Once they update the Z6 and Z7 with dual card slotes, the lineup will make sense

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 07:10 UTC
In reply to:

semorg: Sometimes you need to get lucky and Nikon got very lucky, I think.

Most likely Nikon's product managers planned this entry-level full frame before the pandemic. Not sure how they were looking at their product differentiation strategy a year ago. Now with the economic slowdown, they have a the best priced entry level full frame mirrorless camera. Not sure if it'll be enough or not, but they're offering a very compelling kit for anyone who is looking to upgrade to the mirrorless market.

Those buyers looking to move into the mirrorless system. Probably upgrading from a mobile phone or maybe from a DSLR kit system (with little lens investment) will definitely have to consider the Z5 as an option.

Even more so, with the current and future economic situation, the Z5 might just sway new buyers into Nikon who might have considered Sony, Fuji or possibly Canon.

Well played, Nikon!

I think it’s actually been far too long since Nikon could be considered lucky...,too many things have been going wrong at once for them this past decade. I say this as a happy D610 owner who would already own a Z6 if not for some incompatible 3rd party lenses in my bag. The Z5 looks like Nikon returning to form...if they keep up the AF enhancements and lens releases, then they have a good chance!

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2020 at 06:47 UTC
In reply to:

NotANumber: I used to love Olympus for their innovations, now I feel disgusted by their dishonesty of abandoning systems.

Which system are you upset about Olympus abandoning?

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2020 at 16:20 UTC
In reply to:

It is just a tool: I'm hoping to see a new user friendly GUI and new ergonomic body design. And I would like a less plastic feeling.

Sony’s strong suit has never been ergonomics...whether it is cameras, A/V equipment, or Playstation controllers, the effort always had gone into the “guts” rather than what people see, touch, and use to interact with the device. If Sony really wants to become the market leader, then they need to hire some industrial designers that can work at the same level as the AF software and image sensor teams...imagine an Olympus body with A7IV-level tech inside!

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2020 at 19:57 UTC
On article Olympus PEN E-PL10 review (298 comments in total)
In reply to:

Coomer: No USB charging in 2020. Geez. Is Olympus drunk?

If I had the week Olympus did, I’d be getting pretty drunk right now...

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2020 at 02:13 UTC
Total: 44, showing: 1 – 20
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