sh10453

sh10453

Lives in United States Michigan, United States
Works as a Electrical & Computer Engineer
Joined on May 2, 2010
About me:

My large collection of Canon FD lenses is back to life. Thanks to mirrorless cameras and adapters. I particularly love the FD 35-105mm w/macro, f/3.5, which is well known for its clarity and sharpness, and the FD 50mm, 1.2, L.

Comments

Total: 698, showing: 81 – 100
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On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: Thumbs up!!! Good for him. He did the right thing.
Big companies need to know that false advertising is not to their advantage, especially in this day and age.
USA customers should report the issue to the FTC (Federal Trade Commission), and I'm confident the FTC will get a court order forcing Nikon to stop all kind of false or misleading advertising.

Sadly, lots of comments suggested that he should've just returned it and bought another camera.
That kind of mentality only encourages manufacturers to be even more bold with their false advertising.

Aside from that, it's a matter of "principles", not a matter of returning a camera.
I hope the judge will also hit Nikon with a huge fine plus all legal fees, and order them to fix WiFI or issue some refund to those who bought the camera.
I believe this is not the first time such a case has been raised against Nikon.
This reminds me of VW's diesel-gate!

Exactly, Edna; because no one has taken them to court, yet!

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 15:51 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: Thumbs up!!! Good for him. He did the right thing.
Big companies need to know that false advertising is not to their advantage, especially in this day and age.
USA customers should report the issue to the FTC (Federal Trade Commission), and I'm confident the FTC will get a court order forcing Nikon to stop all kind of false or misleading advertising.

Sadly, lots of comments suggested that he should've just returned it and bought another camera.
That kind of mentality only encourages manufacturers to be even more bold with their false advertising.

Aside from that, it's a matter of "principles", not a matter of returning a camera.
I hope the judge will also hit Nikon with a huge fine plus all legal fees, and order them to fix WiFI or issue some refund to those who bought the camera.
I believe this is not the first time such a case has been raised against Nikon.
This reminds me of VW's diesel-gate!

Correct :)

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 14:35 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: This is almost a pocket size lens when compared with the Canon 5200mm, 220 lbs (100 kg) monster. f/14, though, so most readers will pass :)

http://www.canonwatch.com/meet-the-canon-5200mm-f14-tele-monster/

Yes Joe.
I had read the article on B&H a while back (by the photographer who borrowed it, in NY, and wrote the article). Quite a lens; ... and quite a price!

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 14:34 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)

Thumbs up!!! Good for him. He did the right thing.
Big companies need to know that false advertising is not to their advantage, especially in this day and age.
USA customers should report the issue to the FTC (Federal Trade Commission), and I'm confident the FTC will get a court order forcing Nikon to stop all kind of false or misleading advertising.

Sadly, lots of comments suggested that he should've just returned it and bought another camera.
That kind of mentality only encourages manufacturers to be even more bold with their false advertising.

Aside from that, it's a matter of "principles", not a matter of returning a camera.
I hope the judge will also hit Nikon with a huge fine plus all legal fees, and order them to fix WiFI or issue some refund to those who bought the camera.
I believe this is not the first time such a case has been raised against Nikon.
This reminds me of VW's diesel-gate!

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 13:23 UTC as 71st comment | 4 replies

This is almost a pocket size lens when compared with the Canon 5200mm, 220 lbs (100 kg) monster. f/14, though, so most readers will pass :)

http://www.canonwatch.com/meet-the-canon-5200mm-f14-tele-monster/

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 12:25 UTC as 31st comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

kpaddler: phfft, you call that a "super telephoto"....

This is a super telephoto
http://petapixel.com/2012/04/29/a-look-back-massive-carl-zeiss-lens-from-photokina-2006/

No, this is the super telephoto:
http://www.canonwatch.com/meet-the-canon-5200mm-f14-tele-monster/

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 12:17 UTC
In reply to:

Joe Ogiba: $2,064,500 for a 1600mm f/5.6 Leica :
https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7218/27640585341_55afd262c5_o.jpg

The 1700mm F4 Zeiss APO must cost at least $10 million.

Zeiss introduced the 1600mm f:4 lens in 2006 for the Hasselblad. The new Zeiss lens cost in excess of $70,000
http://www.usedcam.com/field.html

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 11:59 UTC
On article OnePlus 3 announced with 16MP stabilized camera (23 comments in total)

What is limiting the brains of these companies all competing for the "one" name?
They ran out of finding an innovative name?
OnOne, Phase One, Capture One, One Plus, ...
These names are really boring, aren't they?

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 14:33 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

sh10453: What did the Indian government want to hide? The extreme poverty or the filth that a good portion of the Indian people suffer everyday?
Or may be out of respect for the cows if they are in some awkward position?

Satellites have been taking such pictures for a long time anyway, and no government can block them.
It's the 21st century for crying out loud!!!

That must be it, especially when the rapist is a politician. Thanks for clarifying :)

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 13:50 UTC

What did the Indian government want to hide? The extreme poverty or the filth that a good portion of the Indian people suffer everyday?
Or may be out of respect for the cows if they are in some awkward position?

Satellites have been taking such pictures for a long time anyway, and no government can block them.
It's the 21st century for crying out loud!!!

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 13:05 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

sdh: "100,000x thinner" is really the wrong way to state it.
Unless you mean lenses will be like 1000 ft thick.
Sorry, if this were like Yahoo news it could slide but not here. :-(

The grammar looks right to me. Nothing is wrong in saying "100,000 times thinner".

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 23:40 UTC
In reply to:

sdh: "100,000x thinner" is really the wrong way to state it.
Unless you mean lenses will be like 1000 ft thick.
Sorry, if this were like Yahoo news it could slide but not here. :-(

6cm is correct, and that is roughly 2 1/3 inches, which is just a little tiny bit shorter than 1000 ft, I think.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 16:10 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (210 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: Without going through much detail, I think (ON THE LONG RUN) the best implementation for pixel shift is to be processed in the camera without the need for external software to do it.
Most likely this will happen as pixel shift evolves and gets implemented by other major manufacturers.
However, we do not know what the other big names are quietly working on that COULD make pixel shift obsolete.

We'll continue to be surprised with new features and new technologies, like this, the double pixel, 4K video, 8K video, etc.
So waiting a year or so more to buy my latest and greatest camera won't help; six months down the road I'd find myself saying "I should've waited six more months for this latest model" ... :)

Thanks showmeyourpics,
Exactly what I was saying.
The same applies to computers and some other technical things in life (cars, TV's, etc.).

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 17:10 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (210 comments in total)

Without going through much detail, I think (ON THE LONG RUN) the best implementation for pixel shift is to be processed in the camera without the need for external software to do it.
Most likely this will happen as pixel shift evolves and gets implemented by other major manufacturers.
However, we do not know what the other big names are quietly working on that COULD make pixel shift obsolete.

We'll continue to be surprised with new features and new technologies, like this, the double pixel, 4K video, 8K video, etc.
So waiting a year or so more to buy my latest and greatest camera won't help; six months down the road I'd find myself saying "I should've waited six more months for this latest model" ... :)

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 15:06 UTC as 31st comment | 2 replies
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (210 comments in total)

Thank you Chris and the DPR team for this excellent follow-up article.

I too have tried to get used to Silkypix (Panasonic has been bundling it with their cameras for a long time), but I agree that it is frustrating to use.
I rarely use it anymore because of its awkwardness, but no crashes were ever encountered on my various versions of Windows, from XP and up.
Their menu logic and English is mainly the frustrating part.

I'd guess that Adobe has gone on a spending spree to purchase a few dozen copies of Silkypix this morning, after this article came out ... :)

Please keep in mind the operating systems usage when using / evaluating with software on the Mac OS. The vast majority is Windows users.

Windows users worldwide are 87.5% (with Windows 7 alone taking 48.57% share), while Mac OS users are around 6.5%.

Thanks again.

https://www.netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=10&qpcustomd=0

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 14:50 UTC as 33rd comment
On article Motorola Moto X Force / Droid Turbo 2 camera review (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

Howard: Motorola smart phones are junk. I'm saying from experience (owned 2 Droid phones which I sorely regret).

My experience with Motorola phones is the opposite.
I have been using Motorola phones since the mid 1990s (long before digital cellular), and before I ever heard of Google! :)

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2016 at 14:54 UTC
In reply to:

sh10453: I don't see the stuttering that was mentioned in the comments. I think the stuttering in the 4K video is due to Internet speed.
Pause the video after it starts, let it download to near the end (or around 75%), then resume playing.

The camera seems to be doing what is expected from a 1/2.3" sensor.
Back in 2000, some 16 years ago, a 1/2.3" sensor made headline news.
I don't know why Oli decided to go with such a small sensor now in 2016, with this very highly rigid camera, instead of a 1" sensor.
Who in the world wants to go to famous national parks in freezing weather conditions to come back with poor quality, distorted images?

I also do not understand the logic behind such an extremely wide angle lens. 204 degrees? Why? For excessive distortion?

Thanks RJ.
Being in the USA, I forgot about the PAL issue.
Clearly they dropped the ball here.

Link | Posted on May 31, 2016 at 19:47 UTC

I don't see the stuttering that was mentioned in the comments. I think the stuttering in the 4K video is due to Internet speed.
Pause the video after it starts, let it download to near the end (or around 75%), then resume playing.

The camera seems to be doing what is expected from a 1/2.3" sensor.
Back in 2000, some 16 years ago, a 1/2.3" sensor made headline news.
I don't know why Oli decided to go with such a small sensor now in 2016, with this very highly rigid camera, instead of a 1" sensor.
Who in the world wants to go to famous national parks in freezing weather conditions to come back with poor quality, distorted images?

I also do not understand the logic behind such an extremely wide angle lens. 204 degrees? Why? For excessive distortion?

Link | Posted on May 31, 2016 at 14:11 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
On article Looking Sharp: A focus stacking tutorial (220 comments in total)

Focus-stacking of stationary objects should not be a difficult job, but it becomes very challenging, or not possible at all for non-stationary objects under windy conditions, such as flowers, plants, tree branches, a moving boat in the water, etc., regardless of what camera is used, and whether or not it has built-in stacking capability.
Any stationary objects in the scene can be aligned easily by good stacking / stitching software, but parts of the scene that the wind is playing with become a different story because they are at different spots in different frames, regardless of how fast the shutter speed is.
Obviously this is true for landscape as well as macro shots.

Link | Posted on May 29, 2016 at 16:14 UTC as 52nd comment
In reply to:

LEGACYMOMENTSPHOTOGRAPHY: Hang on it is like 1983 or something maybe I need to buy a Canon T70 and feel the power of computerised auto.

I think you are talking about the T-60. It was the last camera Canon produced for the FD lenses.
It's different from the rest of Canon's T line. The only automation in it was aperture priority (where the camera would set shutter speed automatically).
It was introduced several years after the introduction of the EOS system as a cheap camera for photographers who wanted to continue to use their FD lenses.
Aside from AP, everything else on the T-60 was manual, including film loading.

The camera was built by Cosina. Cosina regularly subcontracts with various manufacturers (Canon, Nikon, Olympus, etc.) to build some of their products.

Link | Posted on May 29, 2016 at 13:25 UTC
Total: 698, showing: 81 – 100
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