dccdp

Works as a software engineer
Joined on Apr 1, 2008

Comments

Total: 477, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

borat21: DPs bias towards this subpar tool baffles me

Have you used it lately? I really doubt it, as it's very good. "Subpar", seriously?

Link | Posted on May 21, 2022 at 13:57 UTC

ON1 is quite a surprising software. I have bought their standalone product this year, and it is really good: fast, reliable, lots of high quality features, for me it's a great replacement for LR. If they also slightly improve the lens correction (as announced), it will be excellent.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2022 at 13:53 UTC as 1st comment

What is FPV? Sorry, but a good article should explain the acronyms it uses. While FPV may be obvious for drone enthusiasts, casual readers may know other acronyms better... Sure, a google search does it, but it's about the quality of disseminating news.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2022 at 13:44 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

wus: Every few years I read about another "so much faster" new generation of UFS storage. But so far all of my smartphones - which were always Samsung's top models! - seemed to make no use of the fast memory. Transfer speeds via USB or WiFi were always much much slower than what the announcement of the each respective generation claimed.

So I don't believe Samsung anymore. As it looks now, my next Smartphone won't be another Samsung.

The speed you get on USB is not the same as the speed of the UFS storage. The USB-based transfer is done through a protocol that is very slow and frankly it's maybe the worst part in all the Android experience. Why does Google limit the capabilities of these otherwise very capable computers this way is beyond me. Once upon a time you could simply mount the smartphone as a USB storage device, now they rely on those awfully slow and awkward transfer methods.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2022 at 16:10 UTC
In reply to:

dccdp: Starship Enterprise is clearly visible in this picture, too.

Wow, indeed.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2022 at 15:03 UTC

Starship Enterprise is clearly visible in this picture, too.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2022 at 19:07 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

dccdp: I don't get this. Is copying files on Macs problematic? That is usually a basic feature of any decent operating system, what does this software do, that macOS and the accompanying utilities don't?

OK, thanks, it makes sense.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2022 at 17:44 UTC

I don't get this. Is copying files on Macs problematic? That is usually a basic feature of any decent operating system, what does this software do, that macOS and the accompanying utilities don't?

Link | Posted on May 1, 2022 at 12:27 UTC as 3rd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

dccdp: These may have their uses, but 2.6 kilograms is too heavy to be considered portable. The large RAM is useful though, and I would prefer a 1-1.5 kilo laptop with at least 64 gigabytes onboard and no dedicated video chip (most don't need it).

In the real world, they still sell notebooks with non-upgradeable 8 GB of RAM, which is a complete waste, they should start by correcting that.

@Androole, I'm sorry you feel my statement is absurd, it's probably just that you didn't understand my point. I used laptops for decades, carried one to work each day, and anything over 1.5 kilograms is too heavy. I walk most of the way and believe me, every 100 grams make a big difference.

This is mostly a sort of portable desktop for content creation or gaming, that one could occasionaly move from one place to another if really necessary, not a portable solution at all. And a decently specced ultraportable would be a much better solution for most people -- that was my point.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2022 at 12:07 UTC
In reply to:

dccdp: These may have their uses, but 2.6 kilograms is too heavy to be considered portable. The large RAM is useful though, and I would prefer a 1-1.5 kilo laptop with at least 64 gigabytes onboard and no dedicated video chip (most don't need it).

In the real world, they still sell notebooks with non-upgradeable 8 GB of RAM, which is a complete waste, they should start by correcting that.

That's not what I'm saying. I use ultralight notebooks regularly (not from Dell, incidentally) and they work quite well. But this solution is too extreme, it only fits a niche, while they could focus on bringing decent amount of resources (such as RAM) on mainstream notebooks. Selling 8 GB laptops is environmentally unfriendly, they quickly become obsolete and are thrown away, as they cannot be upgraded.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2022 at 13:09 UTC
In reply to:

Simonella: As with most Wintel laptops I’d expect: lots of noise and heat. You also likely will have to stay plugged in else you’ll get bad battery life/performance.

I’ve put up with Wintel laptops most of my life and I’m done with them.

Most "wintel" laptops *you* used, apparently. My experience is completely different, there are lots of high quality, quiet and efficient Windows notebooks out there. Seriously.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2022 at 12:47 UTC

These may have their uses, but 2.6 kilograms is too heavy to be considered portable. The large RAM is useful though, and I would prefer a 1-1.5 kilo laptop with at least 64 gigabytes onboard and no dedicated video chip (most don't need it).

In the real world, they still sell notebooks with non-upgradeable 8 GB of RAM, which is a complete waste, they should start by correcting that.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2022 at 12:44 UTC as 21st comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Karl Huber: Just went to their website to purchase this and they want to load me up with cookies before I proceed. Not gonna happen.

Without cookies, the web app that implements the store would not be able to tell that the user who paid the product in step X is the same one who should be able to download it in step X+1. Seriously, that's how it works, web pages need to "remember" you are the same user after virtually each advance in a web-based workflow (from the product list to basket, then to the payment, etc.)

There is no web store that works without cookies or other tracking-like technology.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2022 at 21:36 UTC
In reply to:

herrMartin: really what is the risk? sliding a part into another and putting it into a case? and I this "case" you even know the quality of the memory chips and the quality vs getting an expesive "black box" from a manufacture which inside parts might change over the time depending what is the cheapest to get at the moment. I would trust a ssd I buy x times more than any black box sandisk will sell me. with the nvme ssd I can look at the spec sheet and know the quality.

!:! the same case with many articles I read about building your own external ssd - they also talk about risk - w-t-f putting 3 simple parts together like lego.

If some find this risky, then it's not for them, they should pay the premium for the standard solution.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2022 at 01:12 UTC
In reply to:

dccdp: All camera companies have eliminated the lower priced cameras from their lineups. There is no incentive for most people to try their new technologies at the current prices, even if they would be interested in owning a decent dedicated camera.

So basically manufacturers only sell to a part of the already established customers, old enthusiasts and pros. This definitely means they will cannibalize each other sooner rather than later. The customer base shrinks, prices go even higher, customer base shrinks even more, the entire segment may vanish if they don't wake up soon enough.

@Adam007 You overestimate the decision-making processes in those huge companies. They didn't care about the entry level as soon as they have seen they could sell at higher prices. They simply became greedy, that's the process I'm describing, a process which will lead to collapse. Those markets I mentioned (EE and similar) are already lost: there is no way to assess their potential if no one affords the entry level anymore.

There are a lot of people who enjoy photography and understand the limitations of those generic tools known as smartphones. They would gladly enter the world of mirrorles if the decently priced cameras were still available. But at those prices? There is simply no way to do it. Second-hand markets are not that developed in those countries as you may believe, and anyway, second hand can only go so far -- no new entry cameras means no perspectives for the future, so why enter the field?

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2022 at 14:58 UTC
In reply to:

dccdp: All camera companies have eliminated the lower priced cameras from their lineups. There is no incentive for most people to try their new technologies at the current prices, even if they would be interested in owning a decent dedicated camera.

So basically manufacturers only sell to a part of the already established customers, old enthusiasts and pros. This definitely means they will cannibalize each other sooner rather than later. The customer base shrinks, prices go even higher, customer base shrinks even more, the entire segment may vanish if they don't wake up soon enough.

@Adam007 They should reinstate the $500 or less entry point to get new customers. Contrary tou your experience, I know a lot of people that became real enthusiasts by starting from those cheap DSLRs.

And remember, companies don't sell only in the US or the Western world. In countries like those, for instance, in Eastern Europe (which I know well), even $500 is a lot of money. For many it may be half their monthly pay, so $1000 is simply a luxury -- won't even be considered. If companies don't think globally, they will (and did) lose entire markets. Hence the continuous shrinkage of the customer base that I described.

And make no mistake, that phenomenon will cascade and will eventually hurt the enthusiasts too, as companies will simply be unable to provide their tools in a cost effective fashion. Profits from cheaper devices sold to a larger crowd pay for the cameras built for the enthusiasts.

So yes, without reestablishing the affordable camera market, it's only a matter of time.

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2022 at 00:04 UTC

All camera companies have eliminated the lower priced cameras from their lineups. There is no incentive for most people to try their new technologies at the current prices, even if they would be interested in owning a decent dedicated camera.

So basically manufacturers only sell to a part of the already established customers, old enthusiasts and pros. This definitely means they will cannibalize each other sooner rather than later. The customer base shrinks, prices go even higher, customer base shrinks even more, the entire segment may vanish if they don't wake up soon enough.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2022 at 14:34 UTC as 24th comment | 8 replies

Sure. And in the meantime, everybody, including WD, pretends is eco-friendly, protects the planet, that kind of thing.

No hypocrisy at all.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2021 at 01:02 UTC as 13th comment
In reply to:

ottonis: Non-repairable devices should be entirely ignored by consumers. Space savings are just an excuse for lazy design and poor engineering.
Mobile devices used to be as thin as today despite providing user replaceable batteries, super easy repairability and even dust and water protection, e.g. the legendary Samsung Galaxy Note 4.

Making their devices unrepairable by programming batteries and displays, by glueing all internals with tons of super glue, by soldering (!!!) SSDs onto the Mainboard and making them impossible to be replaced is just the attempt to habituate the consumer to extremely planned obsolescence, away from owning hardware and up to getting used to using ", hardware as a service", which in the long run will generate extreme amount of revenue for Apple and Co.

@Thoughts.... PCs and even laptops are obviously larger than cameras, aren't they? PC manufacturers have no reason to prevent upgrades other than greed. About that debatable claim that people throw computers anyway, well, if people are uneducated, the solution is to educate them rather than provide them new and colorful reasons to remain so. And, you know, repair shops can repair/upgrade computers for those who can't...

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2021 at 00:49 UTC

Is this the end of alternative/independent/open source image editing software? Tracking the editing with authorized software seems to be the core of this initiative. And Adobe is a member ;)

Link | Posted on May 13, 2021 at 14:27 UTC as 36th comment | 1 reply
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