matthiasbasler

matthiasbasler

Lives in Germany Germany
Works as a GIS developer, hobby photographer
Has a website at baslerphotos.de
Joined on Nov 25, 2012

Comments

Total: 72, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Lomography launches Simple Use Film Camera (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

kpaddler: BTW, this disposable junk is a lot easier to recycle than your electronic junk...come off your high horse

This is most likely true for the camera alone, but take the films, development chemicals and photo paper into account, and compare the overall ecological footprint of this camera and a digital camera after one year of typical use (assuming you are reusing this camera).

Things will look different then.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 06:03 UTC
On article Lomography launches Simple Use Film Camera (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: Just because someone at Lomo got past this any department with an ounce of sense doesn't mean there's still a market... It just means Lomo wants there to be one.

I would be seriously interested to know which people use them for what reason, because I for one cannot come up with any single use case.

Even If I forgot my camera at home (or the battery is low/memory card is full), then it is very unlikely no one else has a smartphone at hand AND there is a store nearby selling disposable cameras. (I haven't seen any sold anywhere, but haven't been searching for them either.) Maybe its just the "Look at me, I got some different tool." notion that creates this market? Don't know.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 05:57 UTC
On article Lomography launches Simple Use Film Camera (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

mxx: Of course the usual bashing of a new product in the comments section. If DPR users are to be believed, almost no new product should make it to the market, so flawed it always is.

Why don't we celebrate every new photographic product? With the camera market in decline, should we not be happy for every manufacturer that still has the courage to try something new (or old, as in this case)?

"Usual bashing"?
Not quite the point. I have seen other new products warmly welcomed and embraced in the comments section, mostly well-specified high end products though and products which solved real existing problems.
Unfortunately industry is throwing quite a lot of superfluous or half-baked products at the market and its the "task" of the users to sort them out.

But maybe we have to acknowledge that dpreview users are not representative and that there are markets for products which don't appeal to the typical (enthusiast/pro?) readers of this web site.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 05:50 UTC
On article Lomography launches Simple Use Film Camera (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Haim Hadar: I pledge to support a Kickstarter project that would bring this down.

Donating old equipment is a very good idea. I tend to give things away to a charity shop or the recycling center where people can buy them for a bargain.

@Jerome
I wouldn't call this camera cheap at all.
Many years ago I bought my first camera in a warehouse for 20 German Mark (maybe 10-15 USD at that time?) including one film. And that one, although not very capable, did have an auto exposure time and changing films was not an issue.
But of course, it didn't have three filters included ... ;-)

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:51 UTC
On article Lomography launches Simple Use Film Camera (49 comments in total)

Two things come into my mind:
1. With fixed aperture, speed and ISO, how is this camera getting a correct exposure outside where it cannot even use a flash for compensation? Is this a pure indoor camera?

2. I really dislike single-use products, and here chemicals are involved too. I am trying to avoid plastic bags, single-use batteries etc. and the industry permanently comes up with new throw-away ideas. For example, a few years ago I read an advertising sign: "Get a new smartphone every year!"
Thank you Lomo, go on, have fun and ruin the planet...

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 17:38 UTC as 14th comment | 1 reply
On article Extremely dramatic video touts Canon's CMOS technology (196 comments in total)
In reply to:

matthiasbasler: "Extremely dramatic"? I'd say: Extremely disappointing to watch.

By coincidence, just a few weeks ago there was a documentary about the Victoria Falls in Tanzania on TV (on "arte"), where, among others, they followed a single photographer, who, among others, shot beautiful "moonbow" time-lapses over the waterfalls. Believe me, they looked 10 times more colorful and bright than the hard-to-see moonbow in this video.

OK, the difference is that he didn't do a real-time "video", so he didn't have to capture 25fps or the like, but just one picture every few seconds. But hey, it's the result that counts.

Sorry, you are right of course. No idea why I had Tanzania in mind ... /-)

Link | Posted on Feb 21, 2017 at 18:20 UTC
On article Extremely dramatic video touts Canon's CMOS technology (196 comments in total)

"Extremely dramatic"? I'd say: Extremely disappointing to watch.

By coincidence, just a few weeks ago there was a documentary about the Victoria Falls in Tanzania on TV (on "arte"), where, among others, they followed a single photographer, who, among others, shot beautiful "moonbow" time-lapses over the waterfalls. Believe me, they looked 10 times more colorful and bright than the hard-to-see moonbow in this video.

OK, the difference is that he didn't do a real-time "video", so he didn't have to capture 25fps or the like, but just one picture every few seconds. But hey, it's the result that counts.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 18:35 UTC as 33rd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Duckie: Oh what a blow to my confidence! Just starting to think of switching to lighter gear and now this?

> MFT (Panasonic and Olympus) is the way to go.

Seems so. Nikon was mho simply too late on this 1" market and too late for 4K video either. Have a look at the feature-packed Panasonic MFT cameras. I doubt Nikon would have released a camera with just closely as many functions (such as Post-Focus, Focus stacking, Sweep Panaorama, ...) and an equally simple-to-use, crisp and well-stabilized 4K video mode. Maybe some people would argue they like Nikons image processing better, but that's likely a matter of taste and customization.

And though I like literally "compact" cameras for some tasks, it is not useful having to buy three separate cameras just to cover the full zoom range + macro, if three lenses can do the same.

Anyway, I went the MFT way and I'm happy with this decision.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 11:12 UTC
On article TwoEyes VR stereoscopic camera simulates human vision (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

Simon Zeev: I love 3d but I am sorry that the TV companies doesn't make 3DTV anymore.
May be is to late for items like this one.
The last 6 years I shoot pictures almost only in 3d (stereo) and I am very sorry that 3d doesn't catch the market. People are to lazy to put on 3d glasses an view 3d moovies or pictures.

I agree. I have been shooting 3D photos since the mid 90s the classical way: Take one photo, move the camera, take the second one. I really like the result.

How could this his "classical stereo" photography ever catch on if I didn't find any suitable gear for years now:
There's never been a real enthusiast 3D camera with properly synched zoom lenses, light-sensitive sensor and a 3D screen to check the result - and ideally a variable parallaxis, which is crucial for maintaining a consistent depth effect when shooting landscape vs. macro shots. (I believe this is technically possible nowadays.)
Concerning displays there are currently a handful 3D monitors being sold supporting 3D in around 24" size. None is passive (which I'd prefer), and autostereoscopic displays are unaffordable. Not much choice.
Concerning presentation I tried an Acer 3D beamer last year, it failed on colors and 3D flickered unacceptably. Oh, and you would need active 3D glasses for ever viewer.
Forget it.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2017 at 18:02 UTC
On article Canon is selling a gray version of the Rebel T6 (147 comments in total)

Sure, it's only my personal taste, but I find the grey body looks like cheap plastic.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2016 at 16:46 UTC as 7th comment | 5 replies
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85/G80 Review (677 comments in total)

@dpreview. Please correct the specs: Display is listed as "Tilting ", when actually it is "Fully articulated". (This is irritating when comparing cameras in side-by-side view.)

Oh, and also note that Panasonic obviously decided this camera needs a third name, as it is sold as G81 (not G80) in Germany and other EU countries.

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2016 at 14:59 UTC as 37th comment | 4 replies

Yet another candidate for the top ten most superfluous photo products 2016.

(It seems you can put a gold coating around almost everything today, thus creating a expensive product some selected people would want to own. Doesn't need to make sense. It could be a Hamburger ... as long as it's real gold or platinum around it.)

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 21:56 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85/G80 Review (677 comments in total)

Impressive to see that the G85/G80 equals the image quality of the slightly older APSC camera Canon EOS 700D over all ISO settings, even with its smaller sensor. (The small differences are mostly a question of taste imho.)
For me as someone who likes to travel light in terms of camera and lenses the choice is clear.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 21:39 UTC as 97th comment | 4 replies
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85/G80 Review (677 comments in total)

Did I read over it it or did the dpreview team not even note that the camera has an interval timer and stop motion mode? Thy didn't even list it in the camera specs. Being a fan of time-lapse movies this is a non-negligible feature for me.
I downloaded the manual and confirmed it is there, unfortunately not with the non-plus-ultra "exposure compensation" option to smooth out any flickering.

Anyone knows what the limits are (number of pictures and miminum interval in seconds)?
And how many timed shots do you get with one full battery? (Usually depends on temperature and interval.)

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 21:28 UTC as 98th comment | 1 reply
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85/G80 Review (677 comments in total)

@dpreview
In the specification, shouldn't it say "Fully articulated" (instead of "tilting") for the screen, according to page one of the review?

Also, there's nothing specified concerning standalone timelapse / interval timer function. I should expect the camera has an interval timer since the DMC-GX85 has one according to its spec.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 16:28 UTC as 157th comment
In reply to:

matthiasbasler: This is a really cool idea. Google has always up to experiences of this sort, just see their Google Street View (better to be called "Google Park View") which lets you explorer scenic spots of many national parks world wide, albeit with mixed panorama quality. (But hey, its for free!)

Unfortunately the 360° videos, which are the core of this web experience, do not shwp up for me (using latest Firefox), although this browser is among the supported ones. I cannot find any help page on this website, so I guess I'll need to install Chrome to make it work.

I installed Chome portable, and with this most 360° videos work, albeit a few only in 1080p, which is too slow for my connection (or my notebook).

It's a pity the whole experience (all 5 parks) takes 30 minutes to explorer at most, but it shows the potential of this technology. I can imagine to see longer and higher-resolution videos of this sort in the future, maybe as an alternative to "classic" documentaries.

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2016 at 09:22 UTC

Who needs this new compression algorithm for photos?
JPG isn't perfect, indeed, but there already exist better file formats who even offer optional lossless compression, such as the planned successor JPG2000. But have you seen any JPG2000 image out in the wild? I have encountered them only in digital libraries, used for archiving high-resolution images. So for me it seems obvious that there is no pressing need, otherwise cameras would already offer JPG2000 or similar better compression methods.

JPG has such an overwhelming dominance for end users (beside RAW images) I cannot imagine it being replaced by a new compression algorithm in the near and mid future, especially if it requires additional processing power, which is a limiting factor in cameras.

Maybe this has an application for remote sensing etc. where they have to cope with huge amounts of image data?

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2016 at 09:17 UTC as 2nd comment

This is a really cool idea. Google has always up to experiences of this sort, just see their Google Street View (better to be called "Google Park View") which lets you explorer scenic spots of many national parks world wide, albeit with mixed panorama quality. (But hey, its for free!)

Unfortunately the 360° videos, which are the core of this web experience, do not shwp up for me (using latest Firefox), although this browser is among the supported ones. I cannot find any help page on this website, so I guess I'll need to install Chrome to make it work.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 17:25 UTC as 3rd comment | 2 replies

So we have a graphics on top of this artice but I cannot make any sense out of it in the context of this article, and unfortunately it is not referenced or explained in the DPReview article either. What's "bpp", for example?

From what I see in this comparison I'd conclude "JPEG420 is the best compression method", but that's not what the article is talking abount. Is it just an "Oh we need some image about compression" placeholder?

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 16:50 UTC as 3rd comment
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (68 comments in total)

4K is not enough, huh? But besides the fact that vimeo only plays it at 4K I wonder how many of you are actually able to appreciate it at this resolution...
I for one only have a WUXGA (1920x1200) monitor and I'm happy with it.

The video itself is a bit too "flashy" for my liking, but contains several very nice shots and ideas. I wonder what techniques were used to move the camera steadily around the monuments. A camera on rails I'd guess.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 16:29 UTC as 25th comment
Total: 72, showing: 1 – 20
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