Jim Evidon

Jim Evidon

Lives in United States Palm Desert, CA, United States
Works as a Retired
Joined on Jun 2, 2005

Comments

Total: 214, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Lenovo Phab2 Pro is the first Project Tango phone (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: More bells and whistles to keep you buying the newest, latest and useless gadgets.
What's next? A life-sized hologram you can converse with?

To jadot *Slinging, more like.
My 'sling' is not directed at advanced technology per se. As a matter of fact, I am an insatiable technology fan and always have been, given my early adult years in aerospace engineering and design. The 'sling' is directed primarily at useless self absorbing gadgets such as 3D imagery with Dolby surround sound in what is after-all a telephone, or more properly a cell phone. And in this case it is a marketing tool to capture 'the must have the latest thing' customer and serves no practical use except to temporarily entertain the user until he or she gets bored and moves on to the next toy. 3D imagery itself is not to be denigrated and is advancing as we speak in the field of big screen and eventually TV entertainment. The current technology remains crude and eye-straining but eventually a breakthrough or two will get us there.

And my 'slumming' remark was admittedly snarky.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2016 at 00:00 UTC
On article Lenovo Phab2 Pro is the first Project Tango phone (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: More bells and whistles to keep you buying the newest, latest and useless gadgets.
What's next? A life-sized hologram you can converse with?

Eric Hensel,

Slumming.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2016 at 06:43 UTC
On article Lenovo Phab2 Pro is the first Project Tango phone (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: More bells and whistles to keep you buying the newest, latest and useless gadgets.
What's next? A life-sized hologram you can converse with?

To Ethan P99,
Good luck to them. If moving technology got its 'hands' around global climate change, food and water shortages and energy crisis worldwide, I'd be more impressed by that. Some new 'virtual' reality plaything does little to contribute to our civilization. But I suppose it's a cute but useless diversion rather than facing 'real' reality.

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2016 at 22:49 UTC
On article Lenovo Phab2 Pro is the first Project Tango phone (29 comments in total)

More bells and whistles to keep you buying the newest, latest and useless gadgets.
What's next? A life-sized hologram you can converse with?

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2016 at 18:46 UTC as 5th comment | 9 replies
On article Lens shootout: Sony RX10 III destroys the competition (485 comments in total)
In reply to:

keeponkeepingon: According to the EXIF data for the space needle pictures, the Sony and Panasonic pictures were not taken on the same day, they were taken a week apart. (2016:05:11 15:12:36 versus 2016:05:18 16:10:41.041)

Given the level of pixel peeping going on here is it possible we are looking at differences in atmospherics/air pollution versus differences in cameras?

Frankly, I don't pixel peep. If the overall image can't stand on its own, scrap it.
I was just commenting on the so-called "destroys the competition" headline of the review. I guess my sarcasm was too subtle to be noticed. And if you pixel peep, yes there is an improvement over its predecessor. But IMO, its really so marginal that its not worthy of comment, let alone extolling it like it is the second coming.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 20:20 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: What a great feature. I have been resorting to duplicate layers and moving the areas adjacent to the edge of the photo out to cover the white areas for some time now. The results were not always perfect and took further fiddling to make the move look right and the overlap blended. This is a welcome change by Adobe, for a change. Some of their 'improvements' have been rather silly in the past. This one is really useful and I look forward to its incorporation.

Nobby 2016,
What are you doing wrong? I use content aware and like the feature. Content aware is an excellent tool, but as it stands it does require followup work to blend in the "seams". Possible, the new tool will do a better job of blending. There is no point in being critical until it is released, right?

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 20:53 UTC
In reply to:

dmanthree: What's the point of spending all that cash for a Leica and then *not* using Leica lenses? Why not just get a Canon?

Because the SL mount inventory of lenses is still quite limited on this new lens mount. Leica SL owners may want to use high quality lenses not yet available from Leica. I own a Leica T (same lens mount as the SL) and I just sent an inquiry to Novoflex to see if it is fully functional on the T. If so, it will be a welcome bridge product.

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 20:48 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: What a great feature. I have been resorting to duplicate layers and moving the areas adjacent to the edge of the photo out to cover the white areas for some time now. The results were not always perfect and took further fiddling to make the move look right and the overlap blended. This is a welcome change by Adobe, for a change. Some of their 'improvements' have been rather silly in the past. This one is really useful and I look forward to its incorporation.

Frank and Kodachrome 200,
The new tool allows you to do it in one step. But Frank is correct and his method works. But it is necessary to go over the overlap seams with a clone stamp or do a layer and move adjacent patches to blend in over the seam. It works well, but hopefully the new tool will fill without seams that need to be repaired.

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 06:48 UTC
In reply to:

Glen Barrington: This might be useful for Photoshop Elements users, and eventually Corel PSP X6, but for users of the big dog? I have a hard time people who care about the integrity of their photos would find a lot of use for this.

Glen Barrington said:
"...I have a hard time (sic.) (believing) (?) people who care about the integrity of their photos would find a lot of use for this...."
**************************
Glen,
How do you identify integrity? All great images have been the product of post processing with the possible exception of the legendary street shooters like Cartier-Bresson and Wegee. In order to save an otherwise fine image, there is nothing wrong with a feature like this, unless you want to return to the scene and reshoot it. That , for most photographers, is impractical and sometimes impossible.

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 00:43 UTC

What a great feature. I have been resorting to duplicate layers and moving the areas adjacent to the edge of the photo out to cover the white areas for some time now. The results were not always perfect and took further fiddling to make the move look right and the overlap blended. This is a welcome change by Adobe, for a change. Some of their 'improvements' have been rather silly in the past. This one is really useful and I look forward to its incorporation.

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 00:35 UTC as 35th comment | 6 replies
On article Lens shootout: Sony RX10 III destroys the competition (485 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: I don't own any Panasonic or Canon camera. I do have a Sony one. I found the title very biased, irresponsible, and also suggesting some immature school kid type of language.

DPReview has shown Sony bias in their product reviews for some time now. To be fair, Sony is at the cutting edge of digital photography and they do make fine products as long as you overlook their very average lenses. But I do agree that the language DPReview uses on this review is overly sophomoric and could have done with some adjectival restraint.

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 00:22 UTC
On article Lens shootout: Sony RX10 III destroys the competition (485 comments in total)
In reply to:

keeponkeepingon: According to the EXIF data for the space needle pictures, the Sony and Panasonic pictures were not taken on the same day, they were taken a week apart. (2016:05:11 15:12:36 versus 2016:05:18 16:10:41.041)

Given the level of pixel peeping going on here is it possible we are looking at differences in atmospherics/air pollution versus differences in cameras?

Why shouldn't the readers pixel peep. DP Review does it all the time as do some other review sights.

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 00:16 UTC
On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras around $500 (195 comments in total)

DPReview like all sites has it prejudices. Consumer Reports is a good example. Some brands will never make it in it's estimation.
For DP Review, it is apparent that Sony rules and some other brands appear to be consistently less favored. It's possible that the connection with Amazon and it's sales objectives play a part, but without evidence, I won't go near that one.

The reader must take all reviews with a grain of salt and take whatever objective information is available while attempting to filter out conclusions that seem slanted. In the end, it is our decision and our money.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2016 at 00:06 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
On article Primer: What is VR, and why should photographers care? (142 comments in total)

NOT READY FOR PRIME TIME!
(caps intentional)

Link | Posted on May 17, 2016 at 19:54 UTC as 54th comment
On article Polaroid launches Eyeball panoramic tripod head (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

AlanG: I guess this is nice for video but pretty rough for stills.

It clearly is not rotating the GoPro camera through the lens axis let alone through the exit pupil. So how will it accommodate for parallax between photos on relatively close objects? And of course the ideal location for rotation will vary from camera to camera so I think this is just going to be "sort of OK."

Polaroid's website doesn't show it yet, so no weight limit numbers.

It looks like the parallax problem is nonexistent. See the link below. Simply attach a standard Arca-Swiss type clamp onto the threaded boss and use a longer than normal Arca-Swiss type mount on the camera and slide it until the lens is centered and clamp it. I have a Wimberley made Arca-Swiss mount that is 3 inches long and would be ideal for this application.

See: http://www.amazon.com/Polaroid-Rechargeable-Attachments-Bluetooth-Camcorders/dp/B014T2Z5IQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1456520226&sr=8-1&keywords=Polaroid+Panorama+Eyeball+Head

It doesn't look all that heavy duty so I wouldn't recommend using any camera but the small and compact ones with a light lens. The Sony a6000 or the Leica T with a 23mm prime lens look to be the ideal size and probable upper limit. Obviously something smaller would probably be better.

Check Amazon's return policy and if O.K., send it back if it is inadequate for your needs.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2016 at 20:59 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: If I read the article correctly, by employing a global shutter effect to the entire sensor, they could totally eliminate a mechanical shutter; either focal plane or leaf, and simply use the firmware to electronically turn the sensor on or off at user adjustable “speeds” resulting in a lighter, mechanically simpler and more accurate camera.

To the user, the controls could look familiar with dials and wheels, but the internals would be completely electronic. I expect the new product could hit the market within 2 years or much less. I suspect that the project is further along than is reported.

Times they are a changing.

Tae it down a notch guys. Save your ire for something more worth while than shutter sound volume. Your own volume would drown out any shutter in the universe.

Link | Posted on Feb 11, 2016 at 22:52 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: If I read the article correctly, by employing a global shutter effect to the entire sensor, they could totally eliminate a mechanical shutter; either focal plane or leaf, and simply use the firmware to electronically turn the sensor on or off at user adjustable “speeds” resulting in a lighter, mechanically simpler and more accurate camera.

To the user, the controls could look familiar with dials and wheels, but the internals would be completely electronic. I expect the new product could hit the market within 2 years or much less. I suspect that the project is further along than is reported.

Times they are a changing.

Next, we will have a hybrid/electric car on the market for the testosterone challenged that emits pre-recorded V12 Ferrari or Lamborghini exhaust notes.
Zoom-zoom.
What a world.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2016 at 01:05 UTC

If I read the article correctly, by employing a global shutter effect to the entire sensor, they could totally eliminate a mechanical shutter; either focal plane or leaf, and simply use the firmware to electronically turn the sensor on or off at user adjustable “speeds” resulting in a lighter, mechanically simpler and more accurate camera.

To the user, the controls could look familiar with dials and wheels, but the internals would be completely electronic. I expect the new product could hit the market within 2 years or much less. I suspect that the project is further along than is reported.

Times they are a changing.

Link | Posted on Feb 5, 2016 at 18:14 UTC as 17th comment | 14 replies
In reply to:

villagranvicent: Even uglier than my Hasselblad Lunar...

If you bought the Lunar, you are in a difficult position to offer any negative opinions. People who live in glass houses, etc.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 19:58 UTC
In reply to:

dsut4392: What's with that flash position? All the advice I have ever read about underwater photography is to get the flash as far off-axis as possible to reduce backscatter from suspended particles. Moving the flash 5 cm off-axis might halve the backscatter, but it would only increase the flash-subject distance by 3% (based on the 20cm minimum focal distance - the difference would be even less at greater subject distance). This position looks like a recipe for "fish in a snowstorm" pictures.

Putting it in the body would have required extra seals. By placing it behind the glass lens plate, they took advantage of an existing seal and avoided another potential leak point. It's not an ideal location, but any serious underwater photographer invests in an external flash anyway.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2016 at 19:14 UTC
Total: 214, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »