Jim Evidon

Jim Evidon

Lives in United States Palm Desert, CA, United States
Works as a Retired
Joined on Jun 2, 2005

Comments

Total: 326, showing: 1 – 20
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Read:
https://www.dpreview.com/news/2611026820/caltech-research-team-develops-lensless-camera .......on this website.

Chip and lens size on cell phones may become irrelevant as chip technology advances.
Moore's Law may have underestimated the pace of technology advances.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2017 at 00:46 UTC as 3rd comment
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2668 comments in total)
In reply to:

beavertown: DXO:

The Sony a9 comes out on top against the Canon 1Dx II and Nikon D5 with an overall score of 92 points, compared to 88 points for its main action camera rivals. While the Nikon D5 just has the edge for color depth, and the Canon 1Dx II just ahead for dynamic range, the Sony a9 is the more consistent performer of the three at base ISO, offering very good results in all three categories, including the best low-light ISO performance (3517 ISO).

Sounds like a major effort in pixel peeping.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2017 at 00:39 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2668 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: Just for fun, I compared the Sony to the Leica SL and the SL is sharper with less apparent noise than the Sony. Since jpeg images are dependent on camera software, I checked RAW as well. The rankings remain the same IMO. Do not take this as an absolute statement but only a comparison of DP Reviews own images. I chose the Leica because the sensor statistics are similar. Even the Nikon D5 appears to be a slightly better performer. That being said, all three look excellent..

Probably the Sony, but I don't really know for certain. Do you for a fact?

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 23:22 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2668 comments in total)

Just for fun, I compared the Sony to the Leica SL and the SL is sharper with less apparent noise than the Sony. Since jpeg images are dependent on camera software, I checked RAW as well. The rankings remain the same IMO. Do not take this as an absolute statement but only a comparison of DP Reviews own images. I chose the Leica because the sensor statistics are similar. Even the Nikon D5 appears to be a slightly better performer. That being said, all three look excellent..

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 19:51 UTC as 38th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: No matter how advanced cellular phone cameras get, they still have a tiny sensor with all the limitations inherent in small sensor cameras. I have a recent iPhone and I am amazed at the IQ. However, I am primarily a photographer and neither the iPhone nor its competitors can approach the quality of a large sensor camera. That is why I finally broke down and bought a DXO One camera for the iPhone. With its Sony 1 inch sensor and aspheric large aperture prime lens, the IQ frankly blew me away. That is especially so when shooting in the SuperRaw mode that delivers the equivalent of approx. 40 megapixels as opposed to the base 20 mgpxl sensor. Cell phone cameras are perfect for selfies and those 'precious-moment' family pictures but for the finer image, you still need a dedicated camera. BTW, the DXO One has had a very attractive price drop and includes a bunch of useful accessories including a hard shell belt case and the all weather/underwater case for rain forest/snorkeler/scuba fans.

noise photographer: In principle, you are correct. But I always shoot RAW because I don't like the extra work jpegs take to minimize the inherent artifacts.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 19:55 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: No matter how advanced cellular phone cameras get, they still have a tiny sensor with all the limitations inherent in small sensor cameras. I have a recent iPhone and I am amazed at the IQ. However, I am primarily a photographer and neither the iPhone nor its competitors can approach the quality of a large sensor camera. That is why I finally broke down and bought a DXO One camera for the iPhone. With its Sony 1 inch sensor and aspheric large aperture prime lens, the IQ frankly blew me away. That is especially so when shooting in the SuperRaw mode that delivers the equivalent of approx. 40 megapixels as opposed to the base 20 mgpxl sensor. Cell phone cameras are perfect for selfies and those 'precious-moment' family pictures but for the finer image, you still need a dedicated camera. BTW, the DXO One has had a very attractive price drop and includes a bunch of useful accessories including a hard shell belt case and the all weather/underwater case for rain forest/snorkeler/scuba fans.

kreislauf: How is life in Trollhagen? Or do you really have something to contribute to this forum?

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 19:51 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-A3 sample gallery (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

misspiggy01: much better grass and foliage than x-trans and less plasticy skin.

best sensor in any fuji imho.

Like I suggested, change your RAW converter.I had no problems with green or with skin tones.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 19:43 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: No matter how advanced cellular phone cameras get, they still have a tiny sensor with all the limitations inherent in small sensor cameras. I have a recent iPhone and I am amazed at the IQ. However, I am primarily a photographer and neither the iPhone nor its competitors can approach the quality of a large sensor camera. That is why I finally broke down and bought a DXO One camera for the iPhone. With its Sony 1 inch sensor and aspheric large aperture prime lens, the IQ frankly blew me away. That is especially so when shooting in the SuperRaw mode that delivers the equivalent of approx. 40 megapixels as opposed to the base 20 mgpxl sensor. Cell phone cameras are perfect for selfies and those 'precious-moment' family pictures but for the finer image, you still need a dedicated camera. BTW, the DXO One has had a very attractive price drop and includes a bunch of useful accessories including a hard shell belt case and the all weather/underwater case for rain forest/snorkeler/scuba fans.

cosinaphile,

You are essentially correct about phone sensors, although they are quite good for what they are; a convenience if you are not carrying a camera.

Which is why I bought the DXO One camera to attach to my iPhone SE. It is the smallest camera with a decent sized sensor you can get and the image quality is really exceptional. The camera with its 1" sensor is truly pocketable with room left over for keys and small stuff and my iPhone SE in the other pants pocket. I was very skeptical about the DXO One camera when it came out , but I finally ordered one from B&H, knowing they have a generous return policy if I am not satisfied for any reason.

Well, I am satisfied and it is a keeper, especially in the SuperRaw mode. Finely detailed 17" prints are no problem with this little gem.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 07:06 UTC
On article Fujifilm X-A3 sample gallery (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

misspiggy01: much better grass and foliage than x-trans and less plasticy skin.

best sensor in any fuji imho.

I had a Fuji XPro-1 for several years. The first thing I learned was to avoid ACR like the plague. Capture One and Irident Developer are the only way to go. Using those developer/RAW converters and convert to TIFF. Then you can play to your hearts content with LR or PS. The trick with XTrans cameras is to use the right raw developer to avoid the so-called plasticky look. My images looked sharp right out of the raw converter.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 00:58 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: No matter how advanced cellular phone cameras get, they still have a tiny sensor with all the limitations inherent in small sensor cameras. I have a recent iPhone and I am amazed at the IQ. However, I am primarily a photographer and neither the iPhone nor its competitors can approach the quality of a large sensor camera. That is why I finally broke down and bought a DXO One camera for the iPhone. With its Sony 1 inch sensor and aspheric large aperture prime lens, the IQ frankly blew me away. That is especially so when shooting in the SuperRaw mode that delivers the equivalent of approx. 40 megapixels as opposed to the base 20 mgpxl sensor. Cell phone cameras are perfect for selfies and those 'precious-moment' family pictures but for the finer image, you still need a dedicated camera. BTW, the DXO One has had a very attractive price drop and includes a bunch of useful accessories including a hard shell belt case and the all weather/underwater case for rain forest/snorkeler/scuba fans.

Just passing along some information, that's all.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 18:55 UTC

No matter how advanced cellular phone cameras get, they still have a tiny sensor with all the limitations inherent in small sensor cameras. I have a recent iPhone and I am amazed at the IQ. However, I am primarily a photographer and neither the iPhone nor its competitors can approach the quality of a large sensor camera. That is why I finally broke down and bought a DXO One camera for the iPhone. With its Sony 1 inch sensor and aspheric large aperture prime lens, the IQ frankly blew me away. That is especially so when shooting in the SuperRaw mode that delivers the equivalent of approx. 40 megapixels as opposed to the base 20 mgpxl sensor. Cell phone cameras are perfect for selfies and those 'precious-moment' family pictures but for the finer image, you still need a dedicated camera. BTW, the DXO One has had a very attractive price drop and includes a bunch of useful accessories including a hard shell belt case and the all weather/underwater case for rain forest/snorkeler/scuba fans.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 17:59 UTC as 18th comment | 9 replies
On article Report: Ricoh announcing cost cuts in face of crisis (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: It seems that everyone on this forum has a crystal ball that enables them to see into Ricoh's boardroom and divine what their actual business plan will be. Kudos to you all who appear to have an inside information track in this matter. For all of those knowledgeable seers I have one question: How many Ricoh cameras have you purchased in the last three years? OK, I lied. I have one other question: Before the disastrous announcement by Ricoh, how many of you seriously intended to buy a Ricoh (or Pentax) camera for real?

They all take pictures. The best firmware and software is located between your ears ands a decent point and shoot with a good lens and a decent sensor/firmware combination plus your own brain and reflexes are really all that is needed. BTW, I have a bunch of cameras with all the latest in sophisticated features, all of which are really nice but I still can't match Ansel Adams or
or Paul Strand who shot with high quality manual cameras. I'd have a GR or a Pentax K-?, but they would simply duplicate equipment I already have. I hope Ricoh-Pentax sticks around. It would be a poorer world without them.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 17:40 UTC
On article Report: Ricoh announcing cost cuts in face of crisis (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

ron french: I don't know if any of the people commenting on here run their own business, if they do then they would know that you do not let the public know when business is not doing so well, for the obvious reason that it will make things worse. you carry on with a brave face to the public, when you find a solution to the problem you then let the public know that ------- ltd is changing things for the better. so if you do not own a company or business then don't "moan" about things you do not understand. I have been through some very rough times and survived, my customers did not realise that at times things were very bad, but we survived and made good sales on the changes we made to survive. the only news you make public is the good news.

Ron French,
Maybe they have a legal obligation to give timely notice to their stockholders. U.S. publicly held companies are required to publicize the bad news as well as the good news. They don't have the secrecy privileges that small businesses have.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 17:25 UTC
On article Report: Ricoh announcing cost cuts in face of crisis (283 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: Obviously, even if Ricoh shut down its camera operation, it is still in a terrible financial crunch because copiers and printers are 90% of its book of business. So it makes sense not to kill off the camera operation. it won't help. I suspect they are heading for a restructuring.

To the Davinator:
Get your facts straight.
Minolta did not drop their camera line which was selling pretty well at the time. Sony made them an offer they couldn't refuse. Sony wanted to get into the interchangeable lens camera business and picked the easiest way to do it. Pick a fine camera and lens operation and throw a lot of money at them. It worked for Minolta giving them a cash infusion and obviously it worked very well for Sony.
Sony's first offering was simply a rebranded Minolta, lens mount and all.
"Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, they are not entitled to their own facts."

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 07:15 UTC
On article Report: Ricoh announcing cost cuts in face of crisis (283 comments in total)

It seems that everyone on this forum has a crystal ball that enables them to see into Ricoh's boardroom and divine what their actual business plan will be. Kudos to you all who appear to have an inside information track in this matter. For all of those knowledgeable seers I have one question: How many Ricoh cameras have you purchased in the last three years? OK, I lied. I have one other question: Before the disastrous announcement by Ricoh, how many of you seriously intended to buy a Ricoh (or Pentax) camera for real?

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 07:06 UTC as 40th comment | 7 replies
On article Report: Ricoh announcing cost cuts in face of crisis (283 comments in total)

Obviously, even if Ricoh shut down its camera operation, it is still in a terrible financial crunch because copiers and printers are 90% of its book of business. So it makes sense not to kill off the camera operation. it won't help. I suspect they are heading for a restructuring.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2017 at 20:43 UTC as 76th comment | 6 replies
On article 4 times when a Hail Mary might be the right move (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: The most famous combat photos ever shot was taken by Robert Capa of the Spanish soldier being hit by a bullet at the instant of impact. Capa said that he shot it while ducking into a trench and holding the camera ( Leica, naturally ) over his head. He had no idea what was on the shot until it was developed. Even though it is slightly out of focus and obviously un-composed it remains an iconic image of war and death during the Spanish Civil War.

Please forgive the (....) deletions in the above quotes that were necessary in order to fit relevant language into the post that fit within the size limitations imposed by the forum rules. I encourage any readers to go to the site:
https://nppa.org/news/25265 in order to read the entire original article.
Esparza did further research interviewing eye witnesses still remaining and concluded that while Mr. Susperregui accurately located the site of the event to his satisfaction, Mr. S.'s conclusion that there was no combat in the area is patently false. To the contrary; by locating the site in Espejo, he unwittingly validated Robert Capa's image. As for the location of the original negative, given the uncertainties of a war zone and the possibility that the negative left Capa's keeping and was retained and possibly lost or thrown out by Vu or Life or even a friend to whom Capa entrusted possession, we'll probably never find out. The image will remain an icon and made Capa's career.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 23:33 UTC
On article 4 times when a Hail Mary might be the right move (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: The most famous combat photos ever shot was taken by Robert Capa of the Spanish soldier being hit by a bullet at the instant of impact. Capa said that he shot it while ducking into a trench and holding the camera ( Leica, naturally ) over his head. He had no idea what was on the shot until it was developed. Even though it is slightly out of focus and obviously un-composed it remains an iconic image of war and death during the Spanish Civil War.

"Despite years of hard work, Serrano Esparza was quick to admit error. “I do wish to congratulate Professor José Manuel Susperregui and publicly admit my error,” he wrote on the Web. “I firmly believed that Capa made his famous Falling Soldier picture .. in Cerro de La Coja, a little hill on the east outskirts of Cerro Muriano village.” However, “there isn’t any doubt that Professor José Manuel Susperregui is right regarding the location of the picture in Espejo. “ And he even let slip his secret recipe. “There ..(are).. old inhabitants of Cerro Muriano (... children that September 5th 1936 .. ),” .. “.. remember .. well to have seen the Moroccan ..soldiers of Sáenz of Buruaga's column.” However,
.... he holds firm on the critical point: “We don’t agree at all with respect to his statement that the picture is false and The Falling Soldier got up again after Capa made the photograph,” he typed in bold print. In his opinion, the sniper – whether in Cerro Muriano or Espejo – remained.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 23:17 UTC
On article 4 times when a Hail Mary might be the right move (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: The most famous combat photos ever shot was taken by Robert Capa of the Spanish soldier being hit by a bullet at the instant of impact. Capa said that he shot it while ducking into a trench and holding the camera ( Leica, naturally ) over his head. He had no idea what was on the shot until it was developed. Even though it is slightly out of focus and obviously un-composed it remains an iconic image of war and death during the Spanish Civil War.

There is another website you may want to visit.
Go to https://nppa.org/news/25265, an article entitled:
Death In The Making ... For The Last Damned Time dated 11/12/2012
In that article please note the following:
"..Serrano Esparza remained an unheard obsessive in the meantime, traveling time and again to Cerro Muriano, particularly in September (the month the original photograph was made) to check landscapes and light, talk to local sheepherders and make his own pictures. Most importantly, he was able to find what he thought was a critical piece of information, one which changed the whole tenor of the story and perhaps, rather than disproving the photograph’s authenticity, proved it beyond a shadow of a doubt..."

Please go to my next post on this subject.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 23:04 UTC
On article 4 times when a Hail Mary might be the right move (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: The most famous combat photos ever shot was taken by Robert Capa of the Spanish soldier being hit by a bullet at the instant of impact. Capa said that he shot it while ducking into a trench and holding the camera ( Leica, naturally ) over his head. He had no idea what was on the shot until it was developed. Even though it is slightly out of focus and obviously un-composed it remains an iconic image of war and death during the Spanish Civil War.

He certainly put a lot of work into his research which was conducted 80 years later. The photograph which depicts a berm with no really significant details. It could have been any naturally occurring hillock.
From this possibly cropped image, the researcher has decided he can locate the precise place. As a result, I submit that his argument is pure nonsense based upon a false premise that the contour of the berm is sufficient pinpoint the location some 80 years later assuming the land was a natural hillock and not subject to excavation or alteration in the intervening years.

As for it being staged, others with more expertise than I'll ever possess have commented that the position of the soldier is unnatural enough that it could not have been made on purpose by a person staging the event. The piece projecting from the top of the head, while possible placed there prior to a fake setup certainly looks like a genuine skull fragment. I'll give Capa the benefit of the doubt.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 22:56 UTC
Total: 326, showing: 1 – 20
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