Tom_N

Lives in United States Southeast, United States
Works as a Software Engineer
Joined on Aug 31, 2005

Comments

Total: 76, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

dhollender: MAJOR INCOMPATIBILITIES. I bought a 16" M1 MacBook Pro and discovered that my other hardware is rendered obsolete.

1) My Promise Pegasus2 R6 RAID drive will not mount. The drive shows in System Report but not in Disk Utility and it cannot be mounted. I spent hours talking with Apple Care and they had no solution. It would require Promise to offer an update to the software but they no longer support the drive at all.

2) I cannot link to my 2014 iMac. I can establish a Thunderbolt bridge but because the newest OS the iMac can only run is Big Sur, and the M1 is running Monterey I cannot transfer files to the Documents, Desktop or Downloads folders on the M1 from the iMac. Apple Care only told me my iMac is obsolete.

@DerrickRR: RE: "I have 13 external drives and if a single one of them didn’t work with Apple’s latest software release or their new $8,000 laptop I’d be upset too."

Individual external drives aren't the issue. USB storage devices are generic, and new Macs are capable of working with volumes created on older Macs. (The introduction of APFS did not eliminate support for HFS+.)

What the OP had is an old RAID unit that required a driver. Promise lists the Pegasus2 R6 as an "End of Service Life" product for which they are "no longer to provide support including hardware, software, bug fix and security patches."

https://www.promise.com/Support/warranty/EOSL

A development that the OP may find interesting: There is now a "Pegasus2 Series Driver for Mac", dated 01/27/2022, that supposedly has "support for Mac M1 and MacOS 11.0 or later."

https://www.promise.com/Support/downloadcenter/pegasus/Pegasus2/R6

Link | Posted on Feb 20, 2022 at 15:01 UTC
In reply to:

VaggelisPhoto: I bought a MacBook Pro M1 with 16GB memory and and 1 TB hard drive. This is a was a compromise because the M1 Max with 64 GB was not available. I returned it becasue, I could not run Virtual Machines and many many of the windows programs that I use on my 2016 Intel MBPro. Also, I could not use dual monitors. From photographers prospective, M1 Line up might be a very good computers. But for my line of work I think Apple created a vacuum; it will be a while before I can get a usefull Mac.

I ended up purchasing Thinkpads a P1 Gen 2 I9-11950h 64 GB,
and an X1 Yoga I7-11657 Gen 6 32GB. The X1 is what iPad Pro should have been.
The X1 Extreme with I9-11950h 64 GB is £2399 - after discount; a very capable laptop possibly very comparable to X1 Max 64 GB.

The main advantage is that Apple has brought competition to the PCs so that we can get better computers. At least the P1's and X1's price is nearly half the money of its original price; closer to Apple's prices.

@VaggielisPhoto – You can run Linux in a virtual machine on an Apple-Silicon-based Mac. There are ARM distributions of Linux. Most software in the Linux world is either Free Software or Open Source, which allows just about anyone to download source code and build ARM binaries even if there are not ready-made ARM binaries on the distribution site.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2022 at 11:11 UTC
In reply to:

VaggelisPhoto: I bought a MacBook Pro M1 with 16GB memory and and 1 TB hard drive. This is a was a compromise because the M1 Max with 64 GB was not available. I returned it becasue, I could not run Virtual Machines and many many of the windows programs that I use on my 2016 Intel MBPro. Also, I could not use dual monitors. From photographers prospective, M1 Line up might be a very good computers. But for my line of work I think Apple created a vacuum; it will be a while before I can get a usefull Mac.

I ended up purchasing Thinkpads a P1 Gen 2 I9-11950h 64 GB,
and an X1 Yoga I7-11657 Gen 6 32GB. The X1 is what iPad Pro should have been.
The X1 Extreme with I9-11950h 64 GB is £2399 - after discount; a very capable laptop possibly very comparable to X1 Max 64 GB.

The main advantage is that Apple has brought competition to the PCs so that we can get better computers. At least the P1's and X1's price is nearly half the money of its original price; closer to Apple's prices.

@VaggelisPhoto - Apple's record with CPU family transitions is much better than Microsoft's. Apple provided transition aids for 68K -> PowerPC, for PowerPC -> Intel, and now is providing them for Intel -> Apple Silicon.

Microsoft didn't provide the ability to run Win32 binaries on NT/RISC PCs. Years later, they didn't provide the ability to run off-the-shelf Wintel applications on the ARM-based Surface RT Windows tablet. Only recently have they started to build support for Wintel emulation into ARM-based versions of Windows.

BTW, Mac users have followed Apple through every CPU architecture transition, including the in-progress Intel -> Apple Silicon one. Windows users did not adopt NT/(MIPS, PowerPC, Alpha) in large enough numbers to make those RISC-based versions of Windows mainstream. Once people realized that the Surface RT could not run Wintel binaries, it sank like a stone. (As for Windows 11 for ARM, the jury is still out.)

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2022 at 03:42 UTC
In reply to:

dhollender: MAJOR INCOMPATIBILITIES. I bought a 16" M1 MacBook Pro and discovered that my other hardware is rendered obsolete.

1) My Promise Pegasus2 R6 RAID drive will not mount. The drive shows in System Report but not in Disk Utility and it cannot be mounted. I spent hours talking with Apple Care and they had no solution. It would require Promise to offer an update to the software but they no longer support the drive at all.

2) I cannot link to my 2014 iMac. I can establish a Thunderbolt bridge but because the newest OS the iMac can only run is Big Sur, and the M1 is running Monterey I cannot transfer files to the Documents, Desktop or Downloads folders on the M1 from the iMac. Apple Care only told me my iMac is obsolete.

When you say that you cannot transfer files from the 2014 iMac to the 16" MacBook Pro, over a Thunderbolt bridge,

1. How are you trying to transfer files? By putting one of the Macs into Target Disk Mode (using it as an external Thunderbolt hard drive), or by setting up one of the Macs to do File Sharing (using System Preferences / Sharing)? I'm guessing the latter, given your reference to establishing a Thunderbolt bridge (i.e., configuring the Macs to use IP over Thunderbolt).

2. Are you trying to copy files from the Finder, or using Setup / Migration Assistant?

Link | Posted on Jan 1, 2022 at 19:59 UTC
In reply to:

VaggelisPhoto: I bought a MacBook Pro M1 with 16GB memory and and 1 TB hard drive. This is a was a compromise because the M1 Max with 64 GB was not available. I returned it becasue, I could not run Virtual Machines and many many of the windows programs that I use on my 2016 Intel MBPro. Also, I could not use dual monitors. From photographers prospective, M1 Line up might be a very good computers. But for my line of work I think Apple created a vacuum; it will be a while before I can get a usefull Mac.

I ended up purchasing Thinkpads a P1 Gen 2 I9-11950h 64 GB,
and an X1 Yoga I7-11657 Gen 6 32GB. The X1 is what iPad Pro should have been.
The X1 Extreme with I9-11950h 64 GB is £2399 - after discount; a very capable laptop possibly very comparable to X1 Max 64 GB.

The main advantage is that Apple has brought competition to the PCs so that we can get better computers. At least the P1's and X1's price is nearly half the money of its original price; closer to Apple's prices.

Veggie – Sorry, my mistake. I was reading too quickly, and thought that you had bought one of the 14" or 16" MacBook Pros that had the M1 Pro processor, because models with a M1 Max processor weren't available.

The M1 in the 13" MBP is a lower-end SoC than either the M1 Pro or the M1 Max. That MBP supports only a single external display. There are third-party products that you can use to drive multiple external displays – probably at a performance cost. But support for more monitors is one of the differences between the M1 processor used in the 13" notebooks, and the M1 Pro / Max processors used in the more recent 14" and 16" ones.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2021 at 05:35 UTC
In reply to:

VaggelisPhoto: I bought a MacBook Pro M1 with 16GB memory and and 1 TB hard drive. This is a was a compromise because the M1 Max with 64 GB was not available. I returned it becasue, I could not run Virtual Machines and many many of the windows programs that I use on my 2016 Intel MBPro. Also, I could not use dual monitors. From photographers prospective, M1 Line up might be a very good computers. But for my line of work I think Apple created a vacuum; it will be a while before I can get a usefull Mac.

I ended up purchasing Thinkpads a P1 Gen 2 I9-11950h 64 GB,
and an X1 Yoga I7-11657 Gen 6 32GB. The X1 is what iPad Pro should have been.
The X1 Extreme with I9-11950h 64 GB is £2399 - after discount; a very capable laptop possibly very comparable to X1 Max 64 GB.

The main advantage is that Apple has brought competition to the PCs so that we can get better computers. At least the P1's and X1's price is nearly half the money of its original price; closer to Apple's prices.

If your definition of "a useful Mac" is a machine on which you can create an Intel VM, you'll be waiting a while. VMs have the same basic architecture as the host CPU.

As for dual monitor support, M1-Pro-based MBPs support using "up to two external displays with up to 6K resolution at 60 Hz at over a billion colors" at the same time as the built-in display.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2021 at 22:17 UTC
In reply to:

mr.izo: 5um tech embargo. thnx, apple..

I'm guessing that an "embargo" is more likely to be a U.S. Government export embargo than something of Apple's doing. The Government bans exporting certain technologies to certain countries, at least without special approval.

For instance, a good way to get into a lot of hot water would be to export advanced cryptography tools or nuclear technology to North Korea.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2021 at 08:11 UTC
In reply to:

DARKR00M: I love that they brought back MagSafe, and provided that the SD Card slot did not contribute to the increased thickness, I am okay with that too, and obviously the performance upgrades.

But the HDMI, I am not so sure about. I have a nice sleek Thunderbolt/USB-C adapter/dongle that provides two HDMI, not to mention all the other necessary ports and such. I don’t know that having an HDMI plugged directly into the MacBook is any more of an advantage. I would have much rather have an extra Thunderbolt port instead.

Plus I really enjoy using the TouchBar…
.
.

The 16" MBP can only fast-charge over MagSafe. Some reviews say that this is because the current required for fast-charge exceeds USB-C design limits.

The 14" MBP can fast-charge either over MagSafe or over USB-C.

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT212755

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2021 at 07:57 UTC
In reply to:

ChuckRAW: Can you make any assessment how well these M1 Pro/Max run with Parallels and Fusion VM’s? In particular for applications where the Windows systems use the GPU for compute-intensive tasks.
Thx

VM technology creates VMs with the same general architecture as the host computer. These chips have ARM-based architecture, so you cannot create Intel VMs on Apple-Silicon-based Macs, and therefore cannot install off-the-shelf ("off-the-server"?) copies of Windows.

Microsoft has versions of Windows that are built for ARM chips and that have emulation for running some Wintel applications. They use these on their own ARM-based laptop, and, I believe, provide them to some other manufacturers; but have not committed to supporting them on Apple-Silicon-based Macs.

https://www.imore.com/windows-11-apple-silicon-not-supported-scenario-says-microsoft

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2021 at 07:39 UTC
In reply to:

Aberaeron: While nice in theory, such legislation is likely to stifle innovation. Already the number of cables needed for small mobile devices has reduced mainly to Lightening, one of the small flat USB types and USB C. Older devices have far USB variations and those pesky connectors that were brand exclusive, which have largely disappeared from current devices.
Not that I'm against USB-C, but neither am I against lightening. Three short cables and a single charger cover all of my device charging and data transfer needs at a push.

Camera battery chargers for for rapid charging are by far the biggest issue. Every brand has different size batteries that require their own charger and every brand is different. I've just counted seven distinct battery chargers, eight if I count the AA/AAA charger, all permanently plugged in at a corner of my kitchen.

Camcorders used to be - and for all I know, still are - the same way.

Link | Posted on Oct 2, 2021 at 02:23 UTC
In reply to:

Logas69: USB-C and make it a standard USB4 speed while you are at it.

If I am not mistaken, 'A standard USB4 speed" could be anything from USB 1.0 speed (12 megabits per second) up through USB4 40 Gbps / Thunderbolt 3 40 Gbps speed.

So 'a standard USB4 speed' wouldn't fix the situation where some USB-C charging cables only support USB 2.0 data transfer rates while others support USB 3.0 transfer rates. Or the potential confusion between data transfer cables not clearly and explicitly marked with their maximum speeds.

Link | Posted on Oct 2, 2021 at 02:04 UTC
In reply to:

mais51: Talking about e-waste: every year they bring out a new camera, new car, or new phone model to entice people into buying it - the improvement is incremental yet we are told this is the greatest since sliced bread to make us part with our money and discard the just superseded model. This is the real E-WASTE. Responsible companies don't just bring out a new model just for marketing purpose I am looking at you Sony. Take Nikon they don't bring out a new model every year - model life is normally 3 to 5 years, for instance my D850 has been out since 2017 and nothing in the pipeline to replace it, there was a space of 3 years between D5 and D6 and similarly between D810 to D850.

In the old days, computers and TV sets had modular vacuum tubes that took up a lot of space, burned out frequently, took up a lot of people's time on troubleshooting and repairs, and generated a lot of electronic waste.

Now we have monolithic microprocessors, RAM chips, flash memory chips, and other ICs that can't be repaired, but that are much more functional and reliable, and much more energy-efficient.

And we have digital cameras where the equivalent of a "motodrive" is built into the software and electronics without the mechanical pieces that might require one to change out a modular "motodrive" in the first place.

Link | Posted on Oct 2, 2021 at 00:16 UTC
In reply to:

mais51: Talking about e-waste: every year they bring out a new camera, new car, or new phone model to entice people into buying it - the improvement is incremental yet we are told this is the greatest since sliced bread to make us part with our money and discard the just superseded model. This is the real E-WASTE. Responsible companies don't just bring out a new model just for marketing purpose I am looking at you Sony. Take Nikon they don't bring out a new model every year - model life is normally 3 to 5 years, for instance my D850 has been out since 2017 and nothing in the pipeline to replace it, there was a space of 3 years between D5 and D6 and similarly between D810 to D850.

For things that are computerized, it makes a lot of sense for new models to come out frequently. That way the hardware and software evolve a lot more rapidly than if the designers had to try to make 5 years' worth of advances – with no real-world feedback – all at once.

You don't have to buy a new computer or phone each and every year in order to benefit from that. If you go several years between upgrades, you'll find that when you do upgrade, you get major improvements.

With cameras, a lot of functionality has to do with optics, and even with all of the computer aided design and computer distortion correction stuff, lenses are pretty mature. They aren't improving at anywhere near the same rate as processors, memory, or software. So taking several years to release models isn't always as much of a disadvantage in the camera world as it would be in the computer and smartphone worlds.

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2021 at 22:03 UTC
In reply to:

ALEXADNDROS: Fist of all imagine that since is only one cable, would be everywhere available, in hotel in the airport in the bus in the cafeteria, and any friend around you will have it available.
All accessories also will need the same one cable

And worrying about apple development
I think all companies should work together for next standard and apple should have their own input as a big player.
In the other hand i believe Wireless might take the cable away.

Note : the cd standard came after companies working together.
Other good standards are Bluetooth and WIFI .
Standards are to help consumers.

What would have happened if there were laws mandating that the CD-Audio and CD-ROM formats were the only allowed optical disc formats? Would we have DVD-Video, Blu-Ray video, and Blu-Ray 4K video?

Replacing Lightning with USB-C seems like a logical thing to do – and Apple is already in the middle of doing that on the iPad line. But what happens if the EU mandates USB-C and then, 5-10 years later, the USB Forum decides they want to replace USB-C with USB-D? Would USB-D be outlawed in Europe?

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2021 at 21:48 UTC
In reply to:

Spectro: this is basically ARM tech (cellphone small devices) on steroids. ARM is RISC which Apple was using on the PowerPC chip before they converted to x86. Apple history goes in full circle. The issue would be software will need to be coded way differently.

XCode has been the main development environment for macOS, iOS, iPadOS, watchOS, and tvOS for many generations of the Mac, iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, iWatch, and Apple TV products. It's had a lot of time to mature. (Does the "12" in "iPhone 12" suggest anything?)

The M1 chip didn't come out of the blue, either. Apple has been designing high-performance ARM-based chips for the iPhone and iPad for some time now. The M1 is a refinement of those chips. Before there was a M1, XCode already had an Intel-Mac-based ARM code generator that had to work in a reliable way to support the iPhone and iPad. Before there was Metal for M1, as part of Big Sur, there was Metal for similar Axx chips, as part of iOS and iPadOS.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2020 at 16:25 UTC
In reply to:

Joe Phelps: I hope this doesn't throw a wrench into smaller FOSS app developers in being able to support new Apple compatibility. Apps like Rawtherapee, Hugin, Siril can be very useful tools, even in pro environments, (as I speak, I am finishing editing a wedding photo set in Rawtherapee, 10/10 would recommend).

However, they have very small teams of volunteers, and have already been hit hard by things like the new Catalina OS with security restrictions forcing them to pay fees to become "authorised installs".

It's not so much XCode vs. other development environments, as a matter of supported graphics APIs.

GUIs have long differed between platforms. Most Unix- and Linux-based systems with GUIs, that aren't Macs, use some form of MIT's "X Window System" underneath. Macs and Windows systems have their own GUIs with their own APIs.

One Microsoft-specific API is DIrectX. A lot of game developers use it. Apple's counterpart is Metal, which features heavily on the iPad, but also has been part of the last few versions of macOS.

OpenGL and OpenCL are cross-platform APIs so if you write your code to use them, you theoretically can move it between platforms without a lot of rewriting or additional porting frameworks. Theoretically. Apple has deprecated OpenGL across their OSes. This means that OpenGL implementations may go away entirely in future releases of macOS, iPadOS, etc. – and suggests that in the meantime, they may not get as much optimization "love" as Metal.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2020 at 16:07 UTC
In reply to:

Joe Phelps: I hope this doesn't throw a wrench into smaller FOSS app developers in being able to support new Apple compatibility. Apps like Rawtherapee, Hugin, Siril can be very useful tools, even in pro environments, (as I speak, I am finishing editing a wedding photo set in Rawtherapee, 10/10 would recommend).

However, they have very small teams of volunteers, and have already been hit hard by things like the new Catalina OS with security restrictions forcing them to pay fees to become "authorised installs".

Catalina has two default application security settings. If you are a system administrator, you can control whether the system limits applications to those downloaded from the App Store, or to those downloaded from the App Store and from identified developers. Apple gets a cut of sales when you distribute an application through the App Store, but not when you digitally sign it, and distribute it on disc or through your own Web site.

Catalina also provides a way to run applications that are not signed at all (i.e., ones that for all you know, could be malware). You can't give blanket approval to these, but you can approve them on an application-by-application basis.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2020 at 12:19 UTC
In reply to:

thx1138: How pathetic, Adobe won't release Linux versions after 20 years, but Apple gets ARM versions immediately.

Neither Web sites and other servers, embedded systems, or supercomputers generally require much of anything in the way of running commercial desktop applications. Supercomputers have highly-parallel, extremely specialized, and one-off architectures that make the ability to tailor the OS an advantage. With many embedded systems, one thing that manufacturers (aside from the ability to include only part of the OS) like, is not having to pay per-copy royalties on the OS.

Android is a special case of a Linux-derived OS with a large collection of apps – but Android still is not a desktop OS.

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2020 at 23:50 UTC
In reply to:

snapa: All you need to keep from having any issues is to use an Intel chip with Windows 10. Seems like a no brainer to me. ;)

"Once a cobra bit Chuck Norris' leg. After five days of excruciating pain, the cobra died."

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2020 at 13:19 UTC
In reply to:

forest dream: The statement "As of writing, Adobe has not offered a timeline for other Adobe apps built for the M1 chip" show that Adobe may release / not release native version based on Apple's M1 system sell volume.

@IR1234: Apple blocked Flash from iOS, charging "that Flash uses up computing and battery resources too quickly, and that it's unstable"

https://www.lifewire.com/flash-player-for-iphone-1999741

Google also blocks Flash (in Chrome), and Adobe itself will be killing Flash everywhere at the end of 2020.

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2020 at 13:09 UTC
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