iso rivolta

Lives in Neutral Zone Neutral Zone
Joined on Jan 20, 2007

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Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

iso rivolta: So what's the big difference between a mirrorless camera and a DSLR? Both can have the same sensor and can function similarly in live view. A DSLR can become a mirrorless-like camera by pressing a button. Maybe future models will support add-on EVFs. But mirrorless cannot get add-on TTL OVFs. DSLRs will still get new AF lenses with nice mechanical focus rings, while new AF lenses for mirrorless will get only focus by wire.
I've read several times the analogy comparing a car with a horse-drawn cart, which is totally incorrect. If the sensor is the engine of a camera, then both vehicles can have the same engine. Pentax can have the same sensor inside the latest Sony or Nikon mirrorless cameras. Or opt for another sensor if they don't like that sensor's PDAF striping.
The right analogy would compare a car with a normal windshield to a car having a large OLED screen displaying what's in front of the car and the dashboard information overlaid on this screen. Which car would you drive?

@trungtran What's so magic about mirrorless? Why do you think that the technical gains cannot be replicated in DSLR when the same electronics can be inside both cameras? The OVF/EVF is only a viewing system with some contribution to AF, and this when live view is not used in the DSLR. I'm sure that, if needed, the AF in OVF mode will be in future taken over by the main sensor (as the mirror is already semi-transparent). Both are electric cars. Gasoline cars were film cameras.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2020 at 06:37 UTC
In reply to:

jean pierre AKA pete: Mirrorless without an EVF - no, thank you. With - possibly - but then it becomes a cack-handed solution to a problem that didn't exist before mirrorless, because we all had a pentaprism & TTL viewfinder system.

I agree with the comments that won't join this debate. It raged forever, over rangefinder vs SLR. And the rangefinders are still in production. I used them for half a century - no probs.

Some of them combined rangefinder with the pentaprism, some were "pure". Which, come to think of it, is a bit like mirrorless with or without an EVF

I will add one, too. It's a bit like the debate that continues to rage in the background over cellphones (as "cameras") vs "real" cameras. It's utterly pointless to argue over it. It's like saying "this bicycle is better than that vacuum cleaner". They simply serve a different purpose and a different market. End of argument.

I'm not totally convinced with the parallels on rangefinder vs SLR, when the pentaprism first appeared. If we think further into the future, maybe VR glasses or brain implants will replace EVFs and then it will not matter if the camera has or not an EVF. But a TTL OVF will remain a gold standard. All high-end research microscopes still have optical eyepieces even if they're connected to the latest cameras with ultra high quantum efficiency and, believe me, the optical eyepiece image still has some advantages. As it has the mechanical focusing ring.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2020 at 05:55 UTC

So what's the big difference between a mirrorless camera and a DSLR? Both can have the same sensor and can function similarly in live view. A DSLR can become a mirrorless-like camera by pressing a button. Maybe future models will support add-on EVFs. But mirrorless cannot get add-on TTL OVFs. DSLRs will still get new AF lenses with nice mechanical focus rings, while new AF lenses for mirrorless will get only focus by wire.
I've read several times the analogy comparing a car with a horse-drawn cart, which is totally incorrect. If the sensor is the engine of a camera, then both vehicles can have the same engine. Pentax can have the same sensor inside the latest Sony or Nikon mirrorless cameras. Or opt for another sensor if they don't like that sensor's PDAF striping.
The right analogy would compare a car with a normal windshield to a car having a large OLED screen displaying what's in front of the car and the dashboard information overlaid on this screen. Which car would you drive?

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2020 at 05:33 UTC as 100th comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Let me paraphrase:

Pentax is committed to the production of good old fashioned SLRs -- just like your parents used to use. After all, what's more important than having photons directly go from the scene to your viewfinder? Pentax. Because we couldn't trademark the name "Pentaprism."

In other words, Pentax has decided to be the "last player to leave the field" in the hope they'll get an increasing share of a declining market without incurring major new development costs. Good luck on that.

What's not innovative in Pentax DSLR cameras? The first IBIS using magnets (now the only type on the market), first IBIS to compensate for rotational movement, of course IBIS before Canon and Nikon and now the only DSLR with IBIS, Composition and horizon adjustment using the sensor movement, AstroTracer, Pixel Shift (the only DSLR with), AA filter simulator, all weather sealing at lower price points. They always extracted more dynamic range from the Sony sensors and this could be because reading noise is lower at lower reading rates. They don't have the best PDAF module and the highest fps but for sure they did an excellent job for autofocusing old lenses fast in live view. And now they prepare the first APS-C OVF with magnification larger than 1x. I would say that they were more innovative than Canon and Nikon in their DSLR cameras.
http://www.ricoh-imaging.co.jp/english/explore/astro/

Link | Posted on Jul 17, 2020 at 17:50 UTC
In reply to:

Jones Indiana: An interview after they have announced to retreat from the market. Why? This is salt in an open wound.

How ironic. Thanking your customers for their loyalty and support while Olympus now leads their customers into a cold dark future and with an unknown future for MFT as a whole.

These same loyal customers are being forced by Olympus to rethink over what system to choose from next. All while resale value has dramatically dropped after the announcement of Olympus that they are leaving.

Olympus always had this obsession with smaller cameras, and this was the main reason behind their bad choice of the sensor size. This was historically predetermined to happen. The decision was probably taken by nostalgic management looking back at their success and specialization in small but high quality film cameras. Then one followed the other, m4/3 kept the sensor size of 4/3 and phones got larger instead of smaller as it was thought 20 years ago.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2020 at 14:00 UTC

It's not clear if Mr. Kataoka will remain with Olympus or be part of the "NewCo" and if he's talking on behalf of Olympus or of the future company. It is also not clear if Olympus will still make some (compact) cameras after selling the current Imaging Division.
When saying (quote) "We will continue to develop the Micro Four Thirds system [and focus on] areas where we can leverage the uniqueness of our products" he is probably referring to the rest of 2020 when new products will be released. After the takeover nothing seems guaranteed regarding new products.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2020 at 13:44 UTC as 165th comment
On article Ricoh video details the next flagship Pentax APS-C DSLR (656 comments in total)
In reply to:

panther fan: At this point why bother with a DSLR AF system? Just remove the second mirror and let the light which passes the SLT directly fall onto the sensor. That way you got micro adjust free, 1 bazillion points, perfectly accurate AF with 100% AF coverage.

Mirrorless AF goes down to -4/-6Ev so cutting the light the system receives by half is not really a problem. And you can also save yourself the hassle of having a metering sensor in the viewfinder.

@panther fan (continued)
Anyway, I am on the opinion that there are two interesting approaches here: a purist one, in which the DSLR would be optimized for OVF and image quality without PDAF on the main sensor. This will become a rare breed so maybe it will find a niche to allow it to survive.
And the modern approach, this new DSLR type we are talking about, possibly compromising the OVF more, maybe even coupled with a hybrid OVF/EVF with on demand switch. Probably also cheaper after the exit of these ancillaries such as sub-mirror, AF and metering modules.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2020 at 15:56 UTC
On article Ricoh video details the next flagship Pentax APS-C DSLR (656 comments in total)
In reply to:

panther fan: At this point why bother with a DSLR AF system? Just remove the second mirror and let the light which passes the SLT directly fall onto the sensor. That way you got micro adjust free, 1 bazillion points, perfectly accurate AF with 100% AF coverage.

Mirrorless AF goes down to -4/-6Ev so cutting the light the system receives by half is not really a problem. And you can also save yourself the hassle of having a metering sensor in the viewfinder.

@panther fan
"even 30-40% is fine for on sensor AF"- but will be poorer than mirrorless cameras which have 100%, and even with all the light have sometimes lower performance compared to dedicated PDAF on pro DSLRs.
The size of the pentaprism is designed to accommodate the viewfinder eyepiece size. Normally the space on the back face of the prism that remains on top or sides of the eyepiece can be used for light metering without losing more light (it would be lost anyway). It's possible that with modern metering sensors, larger than traditional CdS cells or silicone diodes, the prism is slightly oversized to make room for these larger sensors, but the extra light loss is small compared with loss at the main mirror.
I don't agree regarding PDAF-induced artifacts, Sony A7III and Nikon Z6/Z7 are current cameras that suffer from striping and banding, respectively.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2020 at 15:55 UTC
On article Ricoh video details the next flagship Pentax APS-C DSLR (656 comments in total)
In reply to:

panther fan: At this point why bother with a DSLR AF system? Just remove the second mirror and let the light which passes the SLT directly fall onto the sensor. That way you got micro adjust free, 1 bazillion points, perfectly accurate AF with 100% AF coverage.

Mirrorless AF goes down to -4/-6Ev so cutting the light the system receives by half is not really a problem. And you can also save yourself the hassle of having a metering sensor in the viewfinder.

I was thinking the same, why not remove the secondary mirror and use the sensor like in a mirroless for AF and metering. Regarding your EV calculations, in a normal DSLR 30-40% of the light is transmitted by the main mirror, so not quite 50%. Now Pentax wants to emphasize the OVF, make it a record large (for APS-C) and preferably not lose viewfinder brightness in the process, or even make it brighter. I suppose they could build a custom AF module that needs less light and use a higher reflectance mirror for a better OVF.
And they should keep the DSLR advantage and not have PDAF on the main sensor, to avoid banding, striping and heating issues when not in live view.
I also believe that the bulky articulated screen was sacrificed for a more comfortable viewfinder experience (the talk about the extra 3 mm protrusion). Alternatively, the extra 3 mm and the IR proximity sensor under the OVF were introduced to avoid activating the touch screen with your nose.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2020 at 14:05 UTC

Many early cameras with the Copal Square S vertical shutter had the shutter speed dial on the front panel. Look at Konica Auto-Reflex, Topcon RE-2, the first Cosina Hi-Lite, Chinonflex TTL, Ricoh Singlex TLS and TLS 401. The design of the shutter made top mounting difficult. Probably the most ergonomic and simple solution was to have the shutter speed dial around the lens mount.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2020 at 11:21 UTC as 25th comment
On article DPReview TV: Nikon P950 hands-on review (183 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jon555: I have the (I assume) predecessor, the Nikon CP950. Good to see the sensor has increased from 1/2" to 2/3"...
https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikoncp950/2
Long upgrade cycle tho...
:-)

No, the sensor is 1/2.3" as in the predecessors, P900 and P1000.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2020 at 15:59 UTC

These days it seems it's a shame for a new camera to be called a DSLR. Leica S3 camera, camera, no "DSLR" or "reflex" word anywhere in this page. And then we have this gem: "In addition to a Live View mode with a refresh rate up to 60 fps, the S3 also features an optical viewfinder with 0.87x magnification and approximately 98-percent coverage."

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2020 at 21:21 UTC as 101st comment | 3 replies

So D780 uses a banding-prone sensor (due to AF on the sensor), losing one advantage of DSLR design. We'll see what testing reveals.
The author doesn't genuinely seem excited by the D780 as the title implies. He seems more excited about the prospect of D780 being replaced by a mirrorless version in a few years time. This seems wrong when a new product is just announced.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2020 at 12:04 UTC as 77th comment | 7 replies
On article What the Z50 tells us about Nikon's APS-C strategy (682 comments in total)

"which has seen only one dedicated DX prime (the Micro Nikkor 40mm 2.8) released in the past ten years." Almost, the Micro Nikkor 85mm F3.5 was released on 14 October 2009.
If we're discussing APS-C and many give Fuji as a positive example, Pentax should also be mentioned. They have a very complete APS-C lens line up and don't give up on serving those lenses with a new high end APS-C DSLR. Maybe sometime they'll add a hybrid viewfinder.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2019 at 10:33 UTC as 96th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

avicenanw: Pentax build ergonomically rugged weather sealed cameras with IBIS and pixel shift. Hope they improve on the auto focus system and update their antiquated video. Looks like the rear LCD screen is fixed. Would be nice to have a flip out or an articulated one like the K1.

It seems that the screen is tilting but is very flush against the camera back. Probably it comes out when pushing a button. There are higher resolution images available on other websites.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2019 at 14:47 UTC

So why is the lineage in the clip starting with F2 instead of F1 (twelve years earlier)? Are they're starting to forget their own SLR history, history buffer full?

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2018 at 12:53 UTC as 58th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Mr R Adams: I agree and still consider the DSLR the ultimate photography tool if you need speed, toughness and longevity. If size and weight doesn't matter, why have mirrorless at all.

I get a sense nikon tried this with Nikon 1 but ended up building a coolpix upgrade instead of a system that appealed to enthusiasts. I'd still buy a one if they produced a nice retro body or even one like the Canon g5x

Regarding "solid state". Current mirrorless cameras are not solid state at all and no camera is after all. They need a mechanical shutter, mechanical stabilization, mechanical aperture blades, zoom and focus. They need the mechanical shutter in the same way DSLRs do. If a great new sensor will allow global shuttering, DSLRs will benefit too. The mirror mechanism is fail-proof, never seen a DSLR have a mirror fail but I've seen EVFs damaged due to sunburn like in the original Olympus EM-1 or have stuck/dead pixels. I also believe that mechanically-driven manual focus is more ergonomic and reliable than focus-by-wire, such as is the case with most mirrorless lenses. I guess time will tell...

Link | Posted on May 22, 2018 at 23:05 UTC
In reply to:

iso rivolta: Please give me examples of cameras NOT behaving like this when flash is enabled. As far as I know all current DSLRs do this in live view and almost all mirrorlesss cameras too. Canon cameras behave like this since at least 10 years ago. Nothing special about this Sony. Just another Sony article... strange.

"but I would be happy for the Canon and Nikon shooters that they get some technical advice." I'm happy too for Sony users getting technical advices, but I would also like to see a more balanced ratio of these articles, meaning more about other brands features too. Olympus, Panasonic, Fuji and Pentax cameras have many interesting, original and too little discussed features, while this Sony flash preview thing is a really minor matter.

Link | Posted on May 16, 2018 at 18:15 UTC
In reply to:

Ruekon: Another annoyance worth an article for Sony, whereas just working as expected with other cameras. On my Nikon D500, I can press the OK button to switch live view mode, no matter if a flash is attached. An exposure scale on the side of the live view indicates the mode and the amount of over-/underexposure.

My point is that OVFs are really very well suited to flash photography and for my applications are still better than EVFs. Also, for flash shooting with an EVF camera I would prefer the non-simulated preview, similar with an OVF view.

Link | Posted on May 16, 2018 at 09:18 UTC
In reply to:

Ruekon: Another annoyance worth an article for Sony, whereas just working as expected with other cameras. On my Nikon D500, I can press the OK button to switch live view mode, no matter if a flash is attached. An exposure scale on the side of the live view indicates the mode and the amount of over-/underexposure.

@ Magnar W: Well, I find an OVF often better than an EVF in low light situations sensitive to lag and added noise (e.g. handheld flash macro in low light). I would say better than both simulated or boosted EVF preview but probably also depends on eyesight. And DSLRs also have live view. I hope will soon see hybrid viewfinders for DSLRs, to have best of both worlds.

Link | Posted on May 16, 2018 at 08:26 UTC
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