Lee Jay

Lives in United States CO, United States
Works as a Electrical Engineer / Wind Energy Research
Joined on Oct 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 916, showing: 41 – 60
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On article iPhone X: What you need to know (411 comments in total)

Slow sync is new? LEDs are really only capable of slow sync. What would be new is motion-freeze, i.e. a Xenon flash.

The article doesn't appear to say, but is the "telephoto" camera still limited to 56mm equivalent? That's just not nearly enough. I'd still have to carry a dedicated camera.

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2017 at 13:46 UTC as 74th comment | 2 replies

I'll never understand how thieves can live with themselves.

Link | Posted on Sep 6, 2017 at 19:25 UTC as 34th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

MediaArchivist: The problem with migrating to a new cloud is similar to the problem with getting started with cloud based storage: the initial seed. This varies per person and per need, of course, but it is not unusual for a DP user to have many TB of storage they want to back up (I have about 5TB and I doubt I am extreme).

Most (consumer) internet providers still have asymmetrical speeds: the ingress (download) speed is higher than the egress speed. Since most (consumer) use is downloading, this makes sense. I have a run-of-the-mill 25Mb/s service, but that is ingress. Egress is only 5Mb/s. Thus seeding a cloud based storage will take over three months for me, assuming I am using my internet connection for other things at the same time.

That's why I got 40/20 DSL, then got BackBlaze, then started my backup (with high performance settings set), and then went on a trip. When I got back, all 2.2TB were done uploading.

I didn't get a cloud backup service before that because of the upload speed problem.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 22:52 UTC
In reply to:

huremics: Amazon Prime. By far the best option for backing up RAW TIFF and JPG file types. No other option even comes close in terms of value and ease of use.

Yes...perhaps I should have stated that they have a "limited versioning system". But it's not zero, and I did use it once to get back a file I inadvertently clobbered.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 18:41 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: i told a young computer science student 5 years ago i will never trust a basically unknowable and unaccountable corporate cloud with my data

it is this kind of inevitable betrayal to consumers over security promises that should be a wake-up call to trusting consumers making the mistake of using corporations to store or protect or influence anything you consider valuable or important from you property to your mind cheers

No.

The idea is you keep a local backup and this is the off-site backup. In the event of a problem, the off-site is the third (now second) copy.

Plus, you can (and I do) verify that the data is there periodically. I do this by occasionally going to the site and downloading a file I worked on the night before to verify that the backups are working. Since the likelihood of the site getting clobbered by a natural disaster (or whatever) at the same time as both of your local backups get destroyed is practically zero, this is not a real concern except in the case that the same event (i.e. planetary-level disaster) causing the loss. In that case, you'll have other things to deal with.

I did this verification this morning by downloading the eclipse photo I worked on last night.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 18:39 UTC
In reply to:

huremics: Amazon Prime. By far the best option for backing up RAW TIFF and JPG file types. No other option even comes close in terms of value and ease of use.

BackBlaze does do versioning.

https://help.backblaze.com/hc/en-us/articles/217665868-Restoring-Deleted-or-Previous-Versions-of-Files

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 18:11 UTC
In reply to:

SantaFeBill: My backups are all to local media. I really do not comprehend why anyone entrusts irreplaceable data to a place that can be compromised or taken down at any time.
Yes, local storage can be attacked also. But at least I can decide on, and am responsible for, the measures taken to protect my information.

For many people, having off-site storage backups is a requirement. The problem with doing that yourself is, it's a pain. I know since I did it for many, many years.

This is just a backup, not a primary storage, so this off-site backup approach is really nice. I still have two local copies (one primary and one backup) so I consider this the off-site version only. Way easier than hauling externals back and forth to work and backing up to them, which makes it more reliable. When I did backups externally, I did them every couple of weeks or so. This is done in minutes.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 18:00 UTC
In reply to:

huremics: Amazon Prime. By far the best option for backing up RAW TIFF and JPG file types. No other option even comes close in terms of value and ease of use.

$59.99 per TB per year? Or are you only talking about Prime photos which is "free" if you pay $99 a year for Prime and only backup your images.

I don't need Amazon Prime (no value to me) so this looks like a really expensive and limited option unless I don't understand your point.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 17:56 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: i told a young computer science student 5 years ago i will never trust a basically unknowable and unaccountable corporate cloud with my data

it is this kind of inevitable betrayal to consumers over security promises that should be a wake-up call to trusting consumers making the mistake of using corporations to store or protect or influence anything you consider valuable or important from you property to your mind cheers

This is a backup, not primary storage.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 17:53 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I've been pleased with my BackBlaze subscription. It has worked as-advertised without exception during the one year I've had it. I've got about 2.5TB on there.

That's actually the beauty of it. You don't have to deselect anything, just back up the entire thing. It's unlimited so there's no disadvantage to doing that. It even backs up externals.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 17:17 UTC

I've been pleased with my BackBlaze subscription. It has worked as-advertised without exception during the one year I've had it. I've got about 2.5TB on there.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 16:45 UTC as 40th comment | 4 replies
On article Intro to drones part 2: How to choose your first drone (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: For the video I do every year, I need this:

24-85 equivalent zoom range.
1.5 km range line-of-sight.
90 knot maximum speed.
1 hour flight time.

I've been using a Bell 407 and a Canon 80D with 15-85 or 18-135.

I have multiple R/C aircraft that exceed 100mph. The actual limit is 200mph, but currently only for jets:

Sec 336: ... "the aircraft is operated in accordance with a community-based set of safety guidelines and within the programming of a nationwide community-based organization;"

CBO rules:
https://www.modelaircraft.org/files/510-a.pdf

"For RC fixed wing aircraft: The maximum velocity will be 200 mph."

505mph R/C glider: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFPJ6DUAY10

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 02:35 UTC
On article Intro to drones part 2: How to choose your first drone (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: For the video I do every year, I need this:

24-85 equivalent zoom range.
1.5 km range line-of-sight.
90 knot maximum speed.
1 hour flight time.

I've been using a Bell 407 and a Canon 80D with 15-85 or 18-135.

Undoubtedly, but it also can't do the job I need done. And it may not be cheaper overall, since I only do the flight once a year.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2017 at 19:28 UTC
On article Intro to drones part 2: How to choose your first drone (48 comments in total)

For the video I do every year, I need this:

24-85 equivalent zoom range.
1.5 km range line-of-sight.
90 knot maximum speed.
1 hour flight time.

I've been using a Bell 407 and a Canon 80D with 15-85 or 18-135.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2017 at 15:34 UTC as 13th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Lee Jay: f/352 (I think) is the tightest I used. It was a 17:1 macro. And, yes, now I know better.

The exposure time was 1/250th, because the subject was illuminated by a 580EX from close range (like a foot).

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 15:42 UTC

f/352 (I think) is the tightest I used. It was a 17:1 macro. And, yes, now I know better.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 15:34 UTC as 50th comment | 2 replies

SSDs are still costing 6-12 times as much per GB as spinning drives. I was hoping this would have come down by now but it seems to have leveled off.

Still using an SSD as an OS/app/catalog drive and a 4TB spinning as a data drive.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 16:54 UTC as 27th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Lee Jay: To me, the whole point of an ILC is FOCAL LENGTH RANGE. Wake me when a decent cell phone has something even resembling decent focal length range (i.e. 24-100). And even that would be insufficient for travel. For that, 16-400 is nice, but 180° horizontal to 640mm equivalent is what I usually use.

Had them for at least 11 years. Still waiting for any sign in a phone.

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonictz1

"...this was also the world's first use of a retractable lens system with folded optics..."

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 22:48 UTC

To me, the whole point of an ILC is FOCAL LENGTH RANGE. Wake me when a decent cell phone has something even resembling decent focal length range (i.e. 24-100). And even that would be insufficient for travel. For that, 16-400 is nice, but 180° horizontal to 640mm equivalent is what I usually use.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 13:23 UTC as 327th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

ojos azules: If you like liveview go all in for Mirrorless.
Applies to dpaf also.
Mirror down = sucks.

What if I don't like "liveview" (i.e. not-quite-liveview)?

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2017 at 13:25 UTC
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