Lee Jay

Lives in United States CO, United States
Works as a Electrical Engineer / Wind Energy Research
Joined on Oct 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 829, showing: 201 – 220
« First‹ Previous910111213Next ›Last »
In reply to:

Lee Jay: There are many root problems with this approach:

- File sizes and the resulting processing time
- Video compression and likely no raw mode
- Videos are often shot with slow shutter speeds to make for smooth video
- Slow video shutter speed often results in motion blur as seen in the first image
- Little or no ability to use fill-light
- What little fill a video light can provide pales compared to what a flash can do
- Can't use a flash to freeze motion
- Even 30fps is often too slow to catch the moment. Anticipating a single shot can be more reliable.
- Stuck using an EVF

I've taken stills from video before, but the situations in which it is a useful thing to do are extremely rare.

I'm not saying it wasn't intentional, I'm saying you usually can't make a good still from a good video (because the shutter speed will be too slow for the still) or a good video from good stills settings (because the shutter speed will be too fast for smooth video).

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2015 at 19:25 UTC

There are many root problems with this approach:

- File sizes and the resulting processing time
- Video compression and likely no raw mode
- Videos are often shot with slow shutter speeds to make for smooth video
- Slow video shutter speed often results in motion blur as seen in the first image
- Little or no ability to use fill-light
- What little fill a video light can provide pales compared to what a flash can do
- Can't use a flash to freeze motion
- Even 30fps is often too slow to catch the moment. Anticipating a single shot can be more reliable.
- Stuck using an EVF

I've taken stills from video before, but the situations in which it is a useful thing to do are extremely rare.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2015 at 19:11 UTC as 22nd comment | 7 replies
On article DPReview recommends: Best smartphone cameras (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Frankly, they're all essentially useless because they all have fixed focal length fixed lenses. Without a range of focal lengths available in a cell phone camera, I'll be carrying a real camera anyway, and so I'll use that instead, in all cases.

I could maybe live with two built-in primes and cropping (say, 24mm equivalent croppable to 60 and 80mm croppable to 200), but not one. I have to have some telephoto capabilities in my pocket camera. I often crop my current pocket camera (24-105) all the way in to around 300mm equivalent or so.

How about my kids in the park or on stage? I've used a 70-200 for both, sometimes on crop cameras.

How about family events in the house? Too dark for cell phones, most of the time (my living room is typically about EV 5).

Just basic family shots are almost never within a cell phone's capabilities, either because of low-light or because of focal length limitations.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 20:42 UTC
On article DPReview recommends: Best smartphone cameras (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Frankly, they're all essentially useless because they all have fixed focal length fixed lenses. Without a range of focal lengths available in a cell phone camera, I'll be carrying a real camera anyway, and so I'll use that instead, in all cases.

I could maybe live with two built-in primes and cropping (say, 24mm equivalent croppable to 60 and 80mm croppable to 200), but not one. I have to have some telephoto capabilities in my pocket camera. I often crop my current pocket camera (24-105) all the way in to around 300mm equivalent or so.

Sounds good, until your subject is in the air, in space, far away and you're already at the cliff's edge, or on stage while you're in your seat. In other words, it sounds good until you're in the real world.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 18:51 UTC
On article DPReview recommends: Best smartphone cameras (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Frankly, they're all essentially useless because they all have fixed focal length fixed lenses. Without a range of focal lengths available in a cell phone camera, I'll be carrying a real camera anyway, and so I'll use that instead, in all cases.

I could maybe live with two built-in primes and cropping (say, 24mm equivalent croppable to 60 and 80mm croppable to 200), but not one. I have to have some telephoto capabilities in my pocket camera. I often crop my current pocket camera (24-105) all the way in to around 300mm equivalent or so.

Yeah, fixed-lens single-focal-length cameras are pretty much useless. I discovered this simple fact when I bought my first camera in 1979, which was a Canon AE-1 and 50 1.8. Since I had no other lenses, it was essentially that. And it was annoying, to say the least.

I quickly saved my pennies and bought a 28/2.8 and a 70-210 zoom.

People that look for subjects that can fit their equipment baffle me. I shouldn't have to serve my equipment, my equipment should serve me.

I get a lot of really odd looking portraits taken on cell phones sent to me. While it's possible to shoot portraits with wide-angle lenses, you have to know what you're doing and most cell phone users do not. I often get images of people with big heads or big feet that I have to distort or tilt heavily to make look reasonable.

I still think the first company that makes a main-stream cell phone with good smartphone features and a zoom or dual-focal-length camera will cause a major shift in the market.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 18:24 UTC
On article DPReview recommends: Best smartphone cameras (369 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: Frankly, they're all essentially useless because they all have fixed focal length fixed lenses. Without a range of focal lengths available in a cell phone camera, I'll be carrying a real camera anyway, and so I'll use that instead, in all cases.

I could maybe live with two built-in primes and cropping (say, 24mm equivalent croppable to 60 and 80mm croppable to 200), but not one. I have to have some telephoto capabilities in my pocket camera. I often crop my current pocket camera (24-105) all the way in to around 300mm equivalent or so.

I think they're useless to more than me since the vast majority of cell phone images that are sent to me from others are also useless.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 17:54 UTC
On article DPReview recommends: Best smartphone cameras (369 comments in total)

Frankly, they're all essentially useless because they all have fixed focal length fixed lenses. Without a range of focal lengths available in a cell phone camera, I'll be carrying a real camera anyway, and so I'll use that instead, in all cases.

I could maybe live with two built-in primes and cropping (say, 24mm equivalent croppable to 60 and 80mm croppable to 200), but not one. I have to have some telephoto capabilities in my pocket camera. I often crop my current pocket camera (24-105) all the way in to around 300mm equivalent or so.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 17:49 UTC as 44th comment | 9 replies
On article Canon EF 50mm F1.8 STM real-world samples gallery (140 comments in total)
In reply to:

noflashplease: Does the world really need a "new" 50mm F/1.8 prime that isn't as sharp at F2.8 as the 40mm F/2.8 pancake? What's the point Canon? Upselling consumers to the 50mm F1.4? As it is, a brand new prime lens that isn't acceptably sharp until F4 isn't of much use to anyone.

It will be interesting to see what the street price of the Yongnuo YN EF 50mm f/1.4 settles down to? There are plenty of reviews of the F1.8 and now a few of the Yongnuo 35mm F2.

The point is that's it's a stop and a third faster and 25% longer than the 40, at a lower price.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2015 at 13:33 UTC

This is what happens when you put marketing people together with legalized pot.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2015 at 19:15 UTC as 141st comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

larryis1: I need to get a boxed version so I get the backup disc as well for the upgrade pricing of $79. Anyone know where to purchase a boxed version of the software?

Regards, Larry

Yes, the download is the entire application.

Well, you need your serial number too, of course. Just save it in a text file or document.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 23:57 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "What's more, the output is a 16-bit DNG file"

Richard. I think it's quite important that you mention that this is a 16 bit *floating point* DNG file. A 16 bit linear file can hold around 16 stops of DR. A 16 bit floating point file can hold about 30 stops of DR due to the inherent logarithmic encoding of floating point format.

FYI, I'm not actually sure the pano tool creates a 16 bit float. I know the HDR tool does. Could be, I'm just not sure.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 22:02 UTC
In reply to:

deep7: Decent enough article but why rant on about some random feature that isn't part of Lightroom and which no-one expected to be part of Lightroom? Strange!

Averaging - not relevant. And this is only the first version of merge.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 20:02 UTC
In reply to:

KingOfAtlantis: Had a little play around in LR CC since I own the subscription. I usually use Capture One Pro. I must admit, I am very novice at LR but first impressions compared to C1 is that I have far less control and all my options are crammed into a side bar that I have to scroll or close and open tabs. The Ui feels unnecessary. More like a Smart TV start screen instead of an editing workplace. I want to be able to use LR CC well though so I will give it the benefit of the doubt for now. I just hope I can learn these weird shortcuts easily. I really thought, being Adobe, the shortcuts would reflect off Photoshop. Why doesn't C crop, why doesn't cmd 1 zoom 100% etc.

Use solo mode on the panels (right click a panel header). Way better. Just click to zoom to 100% and there's a pref for zoom to center or zoom to click location. Very efficient.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 20:01 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "What's more, the output is a 16-bit DNG file"

Richard. I think it's quite important that you mention that this is a 16 bit *floating point* DNG file. A 16 bit linear file can hold around 16 stops of DR. A 16 bit floating point file can hold about 30 stops of DR due to the inherent logarithmic encoding of floating point format.

Well, 16 bit float is half the size and "good enough" for the job, so it was chosen. Makes sense to me, since these files are already huge. Why store data you don't need?

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 19:55 UTC
In reply to:

larryis1: I need to get a boxed version so I get the backup disc as well for the upgrade pricing of $79. Anyone know where to purchase a boxed version of the software?

Regards, Larry

Why?

Just download the downloadable version, and back it up yourself (i.e. make your own disk, use a USB drive, save it to your backup drive, Backblaze, etc.).

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2015 at 18:43 UTC
Total: 829, showing: 201 – 220
« First‹ Previous910111213Next ›Last »