Lee Jay

Lives in United States CO, United States
Works as a Electrical Engineer / Wind Energy Research
Joined on Oct 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 770, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Lee Jay: This is for generating captions, not keywords. They are fundamentally different in substantial ways.

Those were for illustrative purposes to indicate how the algorithm learned. It still created an entire caption with verbs and connext in words and which lacked important keywords. For example, keyword in those images would include which beach in which location, the dog's name, and so forth. This algorithm might caption an image "a woman eating a spaghetti dinner" while a human would keyword it "mother, Lisa, restaurant, Chicago, Illinois, vacation". Captions and keywords are fundamentally different.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 11:45 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

I don't take random photos. I take photos of events in our lives. They are thus categorized in folders named after each event. The Eiffel tower shot would have been in vacations\Paris, etc.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 11:40 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

Don't need keywords to find the images.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 03:33 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: This is for generating captions, not keywords. They are fundamentally different in substantial ways.

I didn't know a, of, the and is were keywords.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 03:32 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

Usually a few seconds to a few tens of seconds. My wife can find them too.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2016 at 02:52 UTC

This is for generating captions, not keywords. They are fundamentally different in substantial ways.

Link | Posted on Sep 26, 2016 at 20:38 UTC as 34th comment | 5 replies

"Anyone who manages a large image library knows how important keywording and captioning are for categorizing and keeping things searchable."

I have around 400,000 images, and they aren't keyworded. And I can find them.

Link | Posted on Sep 26, 2016 at 19:58 UTC as 36th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

Lee Jay: This article is about why the apple faithful should care, or about why smartphone photographers should care, not why we should.

The supposed enthusiasts who populate DPReview.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 23:11 UTC

This article is about why the apple faithful should care, or about why smartphone photographers should care, not why we should.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 09:34 UTC as 270th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Lee Jay: It's got two primes, instead of one, and nothing else is new. The three-year-old phone in my pocket has basically everything else.

And the two primes are too close. 24mm and 70mm, if the sensors are, say 1/1.7" 20MP sensors. At 12MP and with smaller sensors, the focal length of the long lens is way too short. Even the 105mm/12MP end of my pocket compact is often quite limiting, even for quick family snapshots.

I thought it came with an adapter to 3.5mm.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 01:38 UTC

It's got two primes, instead of one, and nothing else is new. The three-year-old phone in my pocket has basically everything else.

And the two primes are too close. 24mm and 70mm, if the sensors are, say 1/1.7" 20MP sensors. At 12MP and with smaller sensors, the focal length of the long lens is way too short. Even the 105mm/12MP end of my pocket compact is often quite limiting, even for quick family snapshots.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2016 at 01:11 UTC as 343rd comment | 2 replies

1, 8, 3, 6, 5 in that order, for me.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2016 at 17:41 UTC as 14th comment
On article Photographing fireworks: The basics and then some (66 comments in total)

I've shot many fireworks displays handheld and with shutter speeds as short as 1/80th. It's harder to get good shots, but you can do it. It's easier if you can use IS or modest camera stabilization to get in the 1/10th range. Try to shoot just as several are exploding at once if you have to shoot without a tripod.

Link | Posted on Jul 3, 2016 at 20:30 UTC as 15th comment
In reply to:

Nuno Souto: Only Canikoners might remotely imagine mirrorless is not the future...

Working AF wouldn't be victory as long as EVFs are as terrible as they are now. I tried my friend's A7RII and that EVF is just awful - laggy, slow to respond to light changes, blown brights, crushed blacks.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 14:10 UTC
In reply to:

Nuno Souto: Only Canikoners might remotely imagine mirrorless is not the future...

Fusion power has been the future for the last 60 years.
Flying cars have been the future for the last 50 years.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 03:08 UTC
In reply to:

borisu: Professional equipment for professional use in extreme conditions. And the interview is very focused and informative.

Thanks

Some of these cameras (not the ones shown, but other SLRs) are used on EVAs - total vacuum, and multi-hundred degree temperature swings twice every 90 minutes.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2016 at 02:33 UTC
In reply to:

rugosa: With the lack of gravity who cares if you drop your $8000 camera or $12000 lens.

The 800/5.6 isn't $18,000. It's $44,000 a kilogram.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2016 at 02:31 UTC
In reply to:

lawny13: I don't disagree with that statement at all. I just doubt they are worried about shooting 40 something MP vs 18 MP because of memory storage concerns. i imagine that the ISS has several means to transfer data efficiently and quickly back to earth. The data collected there (you know the important scientific data) needs to be preserved as well as made available to other scientists here.

As for their choice of cameras. I am sure they know what they are getting. These guys are involved with designing tools to observe and explore space after all. But either sponsored or paid, to me is just kind of makes sense that they would go for a top of the line flagship model. it ain't like they would be cheap about their purchase. Having a build in grip is also something that might have been part of the choice (less parts to deal with), slightly more compact than a D810 with grip perhaps? In fact they probably had a proposal for camera and why a particular one should be chosen. At least that is how it is done in the engineering firms I have worked for.

Sometimes the cameras that are sent up have minor changes compared to the stock cameras. Usually, this is because of the outgassing of some lubricant that has to be changed to support the environmental situation on the station.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2016 at 02:29 UTC
In reply to:

carport888: Would this be strong enough for getting decent pics of the surface of the sun?

Well, this is density 4.5. Baader makes solar film for direct observing at density 5 and solar film for photography at density 3.8.

If I were shooting the solar surface in white light, I'd use a Baader film-based solar cell. That's what it's designed for.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2016 at 02:54 UTC

How is this different from the much-cheaper Density 5 Baader solar film?

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2016 at 20:24 UTC as 39th comment | 1 reply
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