Lee Jay

Lives in United States CO, United States
Works as a Electrical Engineer / Wind Energy Research
Joined on Oct 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 1025, showing: 1 – 20
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The one and only reason I would upgrade my still-working phone is if the phone camera could replace my pocket compact. And the only way it could do that if its focal length range could approximately match that of my pocket compact (24-105 equivalent).

I don't care a bit if the image quality is better at 28mm - my Galaxy S5 is plenty good there, in good light. But a Pixel 2 is just as useless at 100mm as my S5 is.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2018 at 16:23 UTC as 96th comment | 2 replies

I already have that tool It's an assembly language instruction that goes by "NOP".

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2018 at 20:59 UTC as 9th comment

Finally someone besides ASUS has made a phone with actual modest optical zoom in a decent phone. Hopefully this will lead to a trend that will ultimately allow me to leave my pocket compact out of my pocket some day.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2018 at 14:52 UTC as 65th comment
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

You only lose two things if you let your subscription expire - Develop and Map. In fact, you can download and use everything else in LR for free right now even if you never subscribe.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2018 at 20:07 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

Your catalog is not your photo library. It does not contain your photos.

If they remove LR tomorrow, no problem, I own a perpetual license. If somehow I lose that, I can always export processed versions of my processed images if I want them and either way I still have my originals.

It sounds like you don't understand the cataloging system. It's just a database that stores metadata about your images thus making fast searches across the entire image library possible. It doesn't affect your images at all.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2018 at 07:14 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

A backup on the same machine or, worse, on the same drive isn't a backup.

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2018 at 23:09 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

No one has a 1.5TB catalog file. My catalog is huge and the catalog file is 4.38GB. Backs up to BackBlaze all the time, quite easily and quickly (less than a half hour).

Link | Posted on Mar 26, 2018 at 22:57 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

Just hit "O" for People View.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2018 at 22:00 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

I also use LR's face-detection and tag every face. I did over 200,000 such images when the feature came out. Took about 38 hours. I keep up with that on new imports, where it only takes seconds to minutes.

I use folder names as my primary organizational means, and you can search for those as well. You can even select one or more folders or collections and search within those.

I had a family member die recently and I was asked if I had any decent pictures of the deceased. Took literally 5 seconds to find every face of that person and show just the face, not the whole image. And that's in a catalog with over 300,000 images. How long would that take using a folder-by-folder image-by-image search?

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2018 at 21:40 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

"Lee Jay, Launching Lightroom just to delete or move a file vs just using Explorer, that's easier how?"

Because it's easier to locate files in LR in the first place, it's easier to select them based on almost any criteria you like, and it's easy to just go to the folder panel with them selected and right-click and select the move files to here option or click and drag. In other words, you can have one folder, collection or filter set open and still move them to another folder or location without another instance.

"What if you decide to rename an image file while using another program?"

Example? What other programs do you use to manage your image files? I use exactly one, and one is plenty.

"I have nothing but contempt for LR's system of cataloging and importing."

It has MASSIVE advantages - like being able to bring up every image of one person you've ever taken in 2 seconds, for just one example.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2018 at 13:29 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lee Jay: "On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

It's all very simple - do any of your moving, renaming or deleting of images from inside of LR. That's it - LR keeps track of everything without issue.

If you do management like this outside of LR, then you cause a headache, but why? It's just as easy, if not easier to do it inside of LR.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2018 at 13:46 UTC
On article Alien Skin Exposure X3 review (219 comments in total)

"On the other hand, it means the metadata and edits don’t live with the image files. " (About Lightroom).

This isn't necessarily true. You can save almost all the metadata out to the files in LR, and you can even have it do it automatically (Edit - Catalog settings - Metadata tab - Automatically write changes into XMP).

In this way, your edits and most metadata are written to either the images files or to sidecar files in the case of proprietary raw files.

If you import those files into a new catalog (or someone else imports them to their catalog), they'll have the edits and metadata for those files already in LR's catalog.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2018 at 13:54 UTC as 43rd comment | 24 replies
In reply to:

GHPhotography: :-0

According to the video, the passengers were all tethered into the sinking helicopter by **fall arrest** harnesses, the kind use by high steel workers and that are made to be slow to get in and out of, unlike a seatbelt.

I like the idea of being securely anchored to the helicopter if it has the doors open, and this kind of thing never occurred to me. Instead, I always worried that the seatbelt that is all to easy to open is the only thing keeping me from falling out the open door. Seems like there needs to be a middle ground.

I have used a seat belt. But I also stay well inside the vehicle - no leaning.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 21:34 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I'm interested in how the color awareness will be created. Recording each individual photon is cool, recording when it arrives is cooler yet, but being able to record its precise wavelength would be astounding. How would that happen?

Art Institute of Chicago. We were there on vacation. The photography exhibit was quite terrible in my opinion. There were a whole bunch of pictures of a guy sticking his head out of a manhole. In black and white, of course. That deserves an exhibit in an art museum?

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 23:04 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I'm interested in how the color awareness will be created. Recording each individual photon is cool, recording when it arrives is cooler yet, but being able to record its precise wavelength would be astounding. How would that happen?

I've never found B&W photography interesting. The world is in color to me since I'm not color blind so I want my pictures in color too. To me B&W is an over used cheap trick to make lousy photos look artsy. I spent time recently in Chicago art an art museum looking at the photography floor. Every image was B&W and there wasn't a good one among them. I have seen a small number of B&W images that were pretty good but for the vast majority of images, color is better. Of my own roughly 400,000 images I prefer exactly one of them in B&W versus color. That's what I mean by vast majority.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 22:28 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I'm interested in how the color awareness will be created. Recording each individual photon is cool, recording when it arrives is cooler yet, but being able to record its precise wavelength would be astounding. How would that happen?

Under 30? I started shooting 40 years ago - on B&W film. I have studied photography from the 1800s on. Monochrome images only very rarely hold any interest for me.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 21:11 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I'm interested in how the color awareness will be created. Recording each individual photon is cool, recording when it arrives is cooler yet, but being able to record its precise wavelength would be astounding. How would that happen?

Because monochrome is boring for regular photography. Works okay in astro where you use a filter wheel to take multiple images in different bands though.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 19:55 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I'm interested in how the color awareness will be created. Recording each individual photon is cool, recording when it arrives is cooler yet, but being able to record its precise wavelength would be astounding. How would that happen?

The idea of this is to NOT operate the way all cameras currently operate, but rather to capture all the light with effectively zero read noise. Color filters will eliminate the "all the light" portion.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 19:06 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: I'm interested in how the color awareness will be created. Recording each individual photon is cool, recording when it arrives is cooler yet, but being able to record its precise wavelength would be astounding. How would that happen?

Yeah, if by "work fine" you mean "filters out something like half the light".

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 17:50 UTC

I'm interested in how the color awareness will be created. Recording each individual photon is cool, recording when it arrives is cooler yet, but being able to record its precise wavelength would be astounding. How would that happen?

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2018 at 14:12 UTC as 64th comment | 22 replies
Total: 1025, showing: 1 – 20
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