Scottelly

Scottelly

Lives in United States United States
Works as a Photographer, videographer, photo/video editor
Joined on Aug 26, 2011
About me:

Shooting photos for about 30 years (with a little hiatus in my twenties), I am an "aspiring" art photographer with a little experience shooting products, portraits, fashion, weddings, glamor, landscapes and various other stuff.

Comments

Total: 1088, showing: 1 – 20
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On article 2017 Roundups: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (344 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ben O Connor: All those cameras are lacking pocketability or sharper lens (1.4 0r higher!) Why limiting... and not for cheap though
(Fuji X70 is a true alternative for a while... but not forever. Even LX7 lumix has sharper lens... stop talking about sensor size l, will you?)

Do you think sensor size has nothing to do with the image quality? The high-ISO performance is normally significantly better when the camera has a full-frame sensor vs. APS-C. Do lenses matter? Of course they do. That is one of the reasons the Sigma cameras are such a good value at under $1,000. Their lenses are equivalent to the typical $1,000 prime lens you'll find for just about any DSLR, and those lenses come with a camera capable of capturing true 39 MP quality images . . . though they are slow and not very good at high-ISO photography.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 13:55 UTC
On article 2017 Roundups: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (344 comments in total)
In reply to:

adegroot: Sigma has announced a firmware upgrade for all DP Quattro cameras, with the inclusion of DNG format shooting, as well as high res shooting (2 images melted into one) for still objects. With DNG we can bypass Sigma's own very good, but very sluggish software.

I don't believe the Sony R1 output 14 bit raw files, but I may be mistaken. Either way those files are noisy as hell. The R1 is not a good camera to compare against any modern camera. It didn't hold a candle to my 5D, and the raw files from that were definitely 12 bit . . . and much smaller (in megabytes) than the files from my R1. The R1raw files were uncompressed. It's weird that Sony couldn't figure out how to use some sort of lossless compression for their raw files . . . and still has problems with that.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 13:35 UTC
On article 2017 Roundups: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras (344 comments in total)
In reply to:

bzanchet: Too bad most of them does not have built in flash, when you attach one the whole point of being compact is wasted.
I love the colors on my RX1 (with a great built in flash) and my RX100, much better than my Fuji X70 (hoped for so much more, selling it, dull colors and soft jpegs).
I wish Sony could make a 28mm fixed lens full frame, myself and everybody who used my camera (no professionals here) complained that 35mm is too close for selfies. That may not be important to most here, but it is a big market share.

I know of no Sigma camera that has a built-in flash. How about you?

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 13:11 UTC
In reply to:

rfsIII: Soccer fields are quite a bit wider and can be a lot longer than American football fields, does anyone know if photographers covering soccer use the same lenses as their American football counterparts? Or do they go for even longer telephotos since the players are comparatively farther away. Or do soccer audiences just settle for wider angles on the shots they see?

There are other games, such as golf, which require even longer lenses. Yes, people use all sorts of lenses to photograph all sorts of sports and other things too (such as distant animals). So what? It's meaningless. We're talking about comparing full-frame cameras. Sony's new full-frame camera can be used with Nikon or Canon lenses, just as it can be used with Sony lenses, Sigma lenses, and Tamron lenses. There are more lenses that are compatible with this new Sony than there are for any Nikon or Canon. That's one of the Sony advantages.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 15:03 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: There's nothing about Sony's a9 that would make me want to switch to their still largely experimental camera system. I totally "trust" and love my OVF equipped, 100% reliable, ergonomically brilliant, Canon DSLRs, their EF lenses, their 600RT speedlights, and their "best in the camera industry" customer service, far too much to gamble on a "FrankenSony" spec sheet experiment.

Still, it'll be fun to see how many early adopters actually buy into Sony's new marketing creation. Go get em, Sony! 😎

Do you realize how silly you sound? One of the reasons Nikon has done so well over the years is that they didn't abandon their old lenses. Sony has worked out a way to not only do that, but they have figured out a way to give their users the ability to use ALL lenses, even the lenses from their competition - Canon and Nikon. This is a HUGE advantage, but you seem to think it's a bad thing, and you talk about commitment. The advantage of Sony's mirrorless system is that we, as photographers, don't have to make a big commitment to get the advantages that Sony is offering us. THAT shows Sony's commitment to photographers. I'd say Sony has put Canon and Nikon is a pretty risky position, and so far it seems that neither Canon or Nikon have figured out what to do about it.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 14:57 UTC
In reply to:

Georgeee: Competition is great. Sony's progress hopefully presses Canon and Nikon to innovate faster to come out with even better cameras (Lenses already top notch ), so none needs to switch! Hold on to your gears for a year or two, things will change.
Also, I do not like Sony's body form factor, way too small to hold, unbalanced with long lens.

This new Sony is a bit larger - better form factor. It has the bigger battery, which many have been asking for. It has other advantages over the A7 bodies too. I think you might want to take a closer look at this A9, before you continue thinking what you have stated here.

BTW, there is NO camera that is "balanced" with a long lens mounted on it. A slightly larger and heavier Canon or Nikon body is not "balanced" with a 300mm f2.8 lens on it, and with a 600mm f4 lens . . .

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 14:37 UTC
In reply to:

abi170845: Peaked my interest this A9. But still keeping my Canon because no other system offers 85mm 1.2, 11mmZoom, 50mm 1.2. And just bought(finally) Phottix Indra which is compatible with my existing 430 RT 600RT and ST commander.

It's funny, but Sony could probably make a 50mm f1.2 and even an 85mm f1.2, but they haven't. I'm not sure why. You'd think they would, just so they could say they have such lenses. I think that would mean a lot to some people. I think they need to make a 600mm f4 and an 800mm f5.6 first though. Some Tilt-shift lenses would be a good idea too, but now people can use adapters to use both the Nikon and Canon Tilt-shift lenses on the Sony bodies, and that's the big advantage of the Sony bodies.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 14:34 UTC
In reply to:

Robert Zanatta: I have more than three batteries.

I have more than three batteries too.

;)

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 14:30 UTC
In reply to:

JhvaElohimMeth: Sony must offer long lenses, full stop.
Only a spec sheet fanboy would buy an a9 to put canikon glass on because of "wow, I have 20fps"... come on!

...and, however, I hope (for the customers, not me) that the finder does its best in very bad light conditions. OVF are very hard to beat in fast moving photography+dim light.

How can you tell if the lens got the focus right? With my Sony cameras I can set them at ISO 6400 or higher and I can actually see if the scene is in focus. I can't do that with the optical viewfinder in my Sigma. The Sigma is no good at high ISO for shooting color anyway though, so I don't use it to shoot in the dark, unless I'm shooting long exposures. Still, in such situations I have a hard time telling if the scene is in focus until I review the first shot. Then I can tell. With my Sony cameras I have been able to tell if the scene is in focus BEFORE I shoot a photo.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 14:29 UTC
In reply to:

minzaw: Why change why switch ???DPR article ?? Sony was/is an primarily audio company venturing all popular fields......such as computers/cameras/phones/minidisc/games bought Minolta for DSLR tech....

I know someone who decided not to get a Sony, even though he was not even a pro, because he liked the way his Canon worked, and he wanted to get an upgrade that he could use more easily . . . so he upgraded to a Canon 7 D Mk II instead of a full-frame Sony. He didn't even have a good collection of lenses yet. Still, Sony is offering more and better cameras, and that's what they need to do, even if all they want to attract is amateur photographers. A certain percent of amateurs will eventually be professionals, and it takes a following to develop a market share. THAT is how it works. Even Sigma cameras have a following of dedicated amateurs . . . some of whom have become professionals, and some of whom have been professionals in the past.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 14:18 UTC
In reply to:

Raist3d: Any working pro sports photographer reads this article and most likely sees it as solid proof to *NOT* switch. You have equipment that does what you want and to get some non-battle trench tested equipment you have to pay thousands of dollars for the switch? Why?

Sorry but 12 fps to 20fps isn't it.

And the idea of say getting a Sony body, and use your Canon lenses with an adapter trading off a little performance again is absurd. Why would any working pro trade a bit of performance *and still have to spend extra cash*? That doesn't even begin to make sense. Where's the advantage in that scenario exactly again?

The "promise" of a better tomorrow is what Sony offers. Will it be a promise that is fulfilled? I hope so. If not, then things will just be back to the status quo. I don't think Sony made this new camera for no reason though. For Sony shooters it is a nice upgrade option. For Canon and Nikon shooters it is another reason to switch. Whether many really will or not is of no consequence. More new photographers will choose Sony now, because of this greater upgrade path. That's the way it works, and if Sony remains committed to creating better and better cameras, Sony will gain more and more of a following, until just as many professional photographers shoot with Sony equipment as Canon or Nikon equipment. What Sony really needs now, if they want people to buy this camera, is a set of high-end, long lenses. (i.e. a 600mm f4 and an 800mm f5.6 - both with image stabilization)

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 14:10 UTC

Pros don't switch . . . ever.

The fact is, some Canon and Nixon photographers will try this new Sony with a lens like a 70-200 or 300mm f2.8, and if they really like it and like their results, they're going to buy the new 500mm Stigma to go with it, and then they just might sell their big Canon or Nixon lens and one of their bodies from that kit. Then they just might get a second Sony body. Eventually they will spend money upgrading to new Canon or Nixon gear, or They'll try an A9. Either way it's going to cost thousands of dollars, so this article is pointless.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2017 at 15:42 UTC as 149th comment | 5 replies
On article Sony a9 first look videos (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tequila MockingjayBird: callsign is now SonyCan. Goodbye CaNikon

I thought it was Canony, but actually it should probably be Nikanony or Sonikanon.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 14:53 UTC
On article Sony a9 first look videos (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

tonywong: Given that there is no VF black out, implying that simultaneous sensor readout can be done while shooting photos, could there be a possibility that a future firmware update/model revision could shoot 20fps RAW *during* 4k video recording, all the while with zero viewfinder blackout and zero dropout in video (of course with no shutter noise and shutter vibration)?

That would be a killer combo with the Sony FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS.

Yes, they're planning to put that into the A9 II.

;)

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 14:51 UTC
On article Sony a9 first look videos (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kiril Karaatanasov: In case anyone has missed it no more apps menu on a9

No more video profiles either

I feel sorry about the apps. They were cumbersome but some of them were very useful and I am not sure if Sony has good alternatives. So overal it is an important loss. The touchless shutter, multiple exposure, smooth reflection were very useful. Time lapse is now built in so that is a good think.

I also find it ridiculous that self timer and bracketing are still under the same knob making it impossible to select both and making it impossible to take night time bracketed shot without remote......

Other than the above I am awed by the technical advancement a9 brings and am looking forward to some more in depth reviews. I hope a more enthusiast oriented sub 2500 euro camera is in the pipeline for the next 36 months

You are correct. I see comments from people about it being a different market and such . . . but that is a bunch of malarkey. These people have no idea what they're talking about. I'll give you the tilt screen as an example. The tilt screens are finally being accepted as a useful feature by "professional" level photographers. The problem was that they have a weird nostalgic feeling about cameras, and for some reason can't get their heads around new technology . . . until they actually use it and find how useful it is. What it comes down to is that if a camera company makes it, the photographers will use it, and then the new features become "necessary" after a short time, and photographers want those "new" features in every camera they get after that. The fact is that fold-out screens are not a new feature at all. They've been on video cameras for decades, but for some reason many old photographers have been very against them for many years. They're finally figuring out they were wrong.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 13:53 UTC
On article Sony a9 first look videos (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

dale matson: I'll stay with my A7R2. I don't shoot sports, love the 42mp and the price. Maybe I can get a good deal on another one when people switch to the A9.

I don't think anyone is going to switch to the A9 from the A7r II. It's more likely that Sony will make an A9r, and then you can switch to that, because it will have that bigger battery, shoot at 10 fps, capture slightly more dynamic range, and have a bigger buffer, two really fast memory card slots, and the ability to shoot 4Kp60.

;)

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 13:47 UTC
On article Sony a9 first look videos (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

leewardism: When you look at the depth of facilities and ability to crank out new models, it must be daunting for the likes of Canon and Nikon just offering comparable models.
Sony is big enough to force your hand to produce new models at every price point. Sony is and electronics company in a photographic field, thus used to turning out new models far more regularly. Canikon are not used to such erosion of the marketplace

Huh? Did you look at how many cameras Nikon has on the market right now? Sony doesn't compare. Canon is no slouch either . . . being the bigger of the two companies, producing printers and scanners as well as cameras, lenses, flashes, and all sorts of accessories (including filters, tripods, carry bags, etc.). Sony makes televisions, video games, and computers (or did they stop making computers?) too. Oh, and they offer memory cards too. But does Sony really make that much more stuff than Canon? They both make consumer and professional level video cameras.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 13:35 UTC
On article Sony a9 first look videos (300 comments in total)

24 megapixels? Really? I don't know what they're thinking, but there is no way in hell I am going to pay that kind of money for a 24 megapixel camera. Maybe they think this thing will compete against the Canon 1Dx Mk II or the Nikon D5. Those are all about lenses and weather seals though, so unless Sony is about to launch a bad-ass new 800mm f5.6 withs optical stabilization and selling it for $5,000, I don't see this camera selling many copies. I guess I'll just have to wait for the A9r (if it ever comes).

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 13:30 UTC as 15th comment | 2 replies
On article Western Digital launches its first portable SSD (143 comments in total)
In reply to:

RadGuy: Why someone would want to spend $400 on a 1TB BACKUP drive is beyond me, when you can purchase a 4TB drive with USB 3.0 for $100. I totally support SSD for your main drive on your laptop/desktop, but for a backup drive, it doesn't make sense at these capacities. So you save an extra 2-4 minutes during backup. Big deal. It's a backup drive and can work independently from your main computer. Can someone tell me what I'm missing?

Only a rich person would consider this for backup. It would be great to use for a portable external file holder though. One example would be for use on the road. I could keep a massive 200 GB Aperture library in one of these, and I could use that with two or three different computers, such as a home computer, my notebook, and my powerful computer at the office or studio. This drive is about speed - not backup. That's why it's a USB-C drive. (Well, and a lot of people with new MacBook Pro computers are going to want these.)

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2017 at 14:16 UTC
On article Western Digital launches its first portable SSD (143 comments in total)
In reply to:

FLruckas: SanDisk technology?

No thank you!!!!

Almost as bad as Crutial.

We've had a much higher percentage of SanDisk media fail than Samsung.

We only buy Samsung now.

Yeah, my 32 GB Samsung Micro-SD card hasn't been as reliable as my Lexar 32 GB Micro-SD cards. I think having a backup is the best way to go. Thinking of that, I better get one of those 4 TB drives ASAP.

;)

I'll wait to get one of these fast drives. They cost too much right now.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2017 at 13:56 UTC
Total: 1088, showing: 1 – 20
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