contadorfan

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jun 9, 2010

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Another fun article about Great Cameras of the Past. I love Throwback Thursday!

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2017 at 13:22 UTC as 62nd comment
In reply to:

caravan: Good for them…The slender Sony A9 however is the future.

Well, this gal has no interest in a bulky full frame no matter what the rating. I'm perfectly happy with my smallish full frame Sony a99ii: less fiddly than the a7 series, yet portable enough to put in a purse, especially with an oldie goldie Minolta 28-105mm (a fine, featherweight lens).

But I don't wish to rain on the D850 parade. Enjoy your fantastic new camera, Nikonians, and happy 100th anniversary!

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2017 at 16:25 UTC
In reply to:

daleeight: Oh yeah, a much better deal than Adobes subscription model that people hate with a passion, yet has netted Above millions in revenue. The whole argument and comparison to others pricing is old news and can stop. people don't want to fork over $10 a month for one, but are happy to find $120 to plop down one time? So they have $120 laying around, but not $10 this month and $10 next? Yeah, the subscription never ends, I get it. But the software is used on every image you edit. If you are switching software apps because of the pricing model, then you need to think better. If you can't afford the $10 a month, then maybe you need to take better out of camera images. Evaluate LR, ON1, Capture1, etc based on your needs and leaving pricing out. Skip this version then. Save the money. Get the next one. In 2 years you could then invest $200 in On1, or $240 in Adobe LR and PS... that $40 important? Or is any improvement any time more important than waiting 2 years to upgrade?

What do you care how other people choose to spend their money?

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2017 at 12:41 UTC

Clever idea & cool results! Thanks for sharing.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2017 at 17:23 UTC as 27th comment
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1581 comments in total)
In reply to:

photog4u: Joy-stick is unusable which in my opinion renders the camera useless. Focus point is impossible to see in the EVF. Lenses are tired especially when compared with their e-mount brethren and Sony doesn't appear to be too keen on refreshing them any time soon. I wanted to like this camera as it ticked all the boxes for me, at least on paper. Once I got it in my hands however, the joy-stick and focus point issues were an immediate buzz-kill. A9 it is.

The joystick was awkward at first, but now it works much, much better. I don't have to be careful about thumb placement anymore.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 00:41 UTC
In reply to:

mick232: Pathetic attempt of being funny.

Tempting meat, apathetic critic.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2017 at 21:56 UTC
On article Nikon D850 Review (1835 comments in total)
In reply to:

aioravecz: Seems like a great camera, but nothing really special compared to my a99II...probably a bit more rugged and the AF is probably on par. The video seems great on paper but will probably be dissapointing in real life. they should have incorporated a oversampled 1.5x crop mode....

"The A99II loses ca. 30% of light due to the semitransparent mirror." Oh no, not this again. The Sony SLTs lose 1/3 to 1/2 OF A STOP, which is not the same as losing 30% of light. One third of a stop is one little tick on the meter scale that you see in the viewfinder.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 22:58 UTC
In reply to:

panchorancho: This is a great camera at an awesome price. Total Sony A9 and Canon 5DR killer!

"...A-mount is dead..."

I've been hearing that for 7 years.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 12:55 UTC
On article Don't buy another lens, buy a flash instead (336 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dante Birchen: Just never ever under no circumstances point your flash directly at your subject. No need to buy new flash. I got mine as a side catch when buying an old film slr for it's lens (and a nice compact camera bag as a bonus :p)..

Re flash pointed directly at subject, my favorite shots last year were taken using the camera's pop-up flash. You can learn to use it discretely or to make a subject pop against a dark background.

I moved to full frame this year, & I really miss having a pop-up flash.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2017 at 16:27 UTC
On article Don't buy another lens, buy a flash instead (336 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kaso: "Forget Lenses, Buy a Flash"
"Don't buy another lens, buy a flash instead"

Cheap tabloid title that pitches A against B.

To everything -- turn, turn, turn
There is a season -- turn, turn, turn
And a time to every purpose under heaven

A time to use fast lens, a time to use flash
A time to stay wide, a time to come close
A time for motion blur, a time for action freeze
A time for soft background, a time for everything sharp
A time for crop, a time for larger format
. . .

"There are times when a flash is appropriate"
There, isn't that a much better title?

Yeah, I thought that fisheye album cover shot was so cool. Come to think of it, those fabulous album covers (& the emerging world of rock photography) were my introduction to fine photography.

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 19:31 UTC
On article Don't buy another lens, buy a flash instead (336 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sezano: Who was that NY street photographer who used only film a flash connected by wire on the other hand to scare the shize out of random people? My hero!

Arbus used flash beautifully. She had little understanding or patience for the technical mastery of a camera, but she really nailed the mastery of flash photography.

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 19:25 UTC
In reply to:

Father Bouvier: Leftist extortionists got money from another victim. Remember, the despicable guy who said, "If You've Got A Business, You Didn't Build That."

I suspect La Raza, which profited handsomely from many a DOJ shakedown, is involved. La Raza is now UnidosUS, a name change which occurred after complaints of DOJ settlement billions going to Dem-supporting grass roots groups (La Raza one of the most prominent) instead of going into the US Treasury. It's all politics.

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2017 at 14:10 UTC
On photo West Quoddy Head Light in the Lighthouses challenge (15 comments in total)

What a beautiful photo!

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2017 at 16:23 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Deutsch: Good article. I grew up and went to school in Pittsburgh. When I was at the University of Pittsburgh in Engineering back in the early 70s, there was the Carnegie Library there on campus, next to the Carnegie museum. While I was in the library, I discovered a huge folder collection of W. Eugene Smith's original prints in a glass counter case, not on display.

Had to be at least a hundred prints around 11x14 in size, all loosely thrown in a folder, each one in a plastic sleeve, not bound, just stuck individually in the folder. I asked the librarian if I could look at them. They gave them to me and I'd sit for an hour or two at the table there going through them. They slid all over the table in those plastic sleeves. I used to go back every month.

Moved away from Pittsburgh after graduation. Now, years later, I went back to Pittsburgh to visit, and they're no where around and no one knows what I'm talking about. I suppose they're in some photo collection somewhere?

Fascinating. Thanks for posting your story. I hope the photos are safely ensconced in the library archives, awaiting digital cataloging. Having worked in a library as a cataloger, I know there are sometimes old items that need to be cataloged "by hand" (as opposed to downloading a prefab record), and if the library is short of trained staff, it can take awhile to get to those items.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2017 at 17:57 UTC
In reply to:

contadorfan: I've waited for the publication of Sam Stephenson's book for what seems like forever. I was beginning to think it was his own Pittsburgh Project, one that ran on and on and on in pursuit of perfectionism at great personal cost to the author's sanity & personal life, but never completed, such as what happened to Gene Smith when he undertook his Pittsburgh Project. Now the book will soon be in my mailbox, and I can hardly wait to get lost in the absorbing details.

Last night I rented the documentary "The Jazz Loft According to W. Eugene Smith" from Amazon. Fabulous and fascinating. Great photography, great music!

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2017 at 17:53 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: I'll never be as good as the greats, but that doesn't bother me because I'm happy to admire the work of the greats and have something to aspire to. I'll never be satisfied with what I produce because I'm a perfectionist, but I sure as hell have NEVER considered giving up photography - it's frustrating when things don't go according to plan, but extremely rewarding when it all comes together. Photography takes me around the world and opens my eyes to the beauty around me.

Well said, entoman. Plus, at least in my case, I can say, "I'm sure a heck of a lot better than when I first started." Hope is a great motivator.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2017 at 17:32 UTC
In reply to:

Brueghel: Is this art?
🤔

No. I think it's Cindy Sherman's tendency to poke fun using her own image. I like that she doesn't take herself too seriously.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 20:47 UTC
In reply to:

contadorfan: I've waited for the publication of Sam Stephenson's book for what seems like forever. I was beginning to think it was his own Pittsburgh Project, one that ran on and on and on in pursuit of perfectionism at great personal cost to the author's sanity & personal life, but never completed, such as what happened to Gene Smith when he undertook his Pittsburgh Project. Now the book will soon be in my mailbox, and I can hardly wait to get lost in the absorbing details.

Also,
Four years ago I first encountered Smith's work at an exhibit of his jazz loft photographs at the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona. The prints were stunning: a fabulous range of grays, velvety blacks, and varying highlights to lead one's eye around the scene. I was admiring a rainy street picture, wishing I could run my hands over the rich texture of gray wet pavement, when I realized, "Holy moly, he can make even asphalt look sensuous!" I broke out in a cold sweat & had to leave the room to compose myself. It made me realize the impossibly deep & wide chasm between my own amateur efforts and Smith's genius, and it completely blew me away. I didn't know that photo prints could have such depth, richness, and an almost tactile quality to them. Never in my life have I had such an overwhelming response to photography or to any other art form like I did to W. Eugene Smith's prints.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 22:31 UTC

I've waited for the publication of Sam Stephenson's book for what seems like forever. I was beginning to think it was his own Pittsburgh Project, one that ran on and on and on in pursuit of perfectionism at great personal cost to the author's sanity & personal life, but never completed, such as what happened to Gene Smith when he undertook his Pittsburgh Project. Now the book will soon be in my mailbox, and I can hardly wait to get lost in the absorbing details.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 22:23 UTC as 4th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

munro harrap: What is wrong here? First the picture shows someone unable to see anything through anything with the camera in the grass too close to work in focus. 2. Then whoever it is endangers this machine with a coffee in his hand. 3. Then there is an article about the share price of a company, when this is allegedly a photography site, not lloyds of London, The Financial Times or an appropriate area...

While I laud many efforts here, reporting ANY companies finances is not one of them.

That's Sony's latest camera -- 42mp uncompressed raw files AND it will mow your grass for you too. Kind of like a Roomba for the lawn with a great sensor for photos.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2017 at 00:11 UTC
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