contadorfan

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jun 9, 2010

Comments

Total: 141, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Buying a second lens: what lens should I buy next? (303 comments in total)
In reply to:

contadorfan: Having recently graduated from newbie status, I second Teila Day's recommendation to invest in a quality zoom over a fast prime. In the beginning, just learning the basic operations of the camera is overwhelming. Once you get comfortable with getting the exposure right, nailing the shutter speed, learning a few camera bells & whistles & basic post processing, then you can move on to the lens. The versatility of a zoom lets you play with wide angle, normal, & short telephoto compositions. You can quickly get a feel for the effects of different focal lengths. It's a great way to discover what kind of photography you enjoy doing. A fast prime, on the other hand, can have such a thin depth of field that it's not all that useable for a majority of situations. It works in low light, sure, but when your DOF is only a few inches, it's useless for taking pictures of your active dog or kids. And then there's the limit of a single focal length for various situations -- that gets stale.

But switching to a quality zoom can also give better sharpness & clarity, along with a variety of useful focal lengths, without having to pay for the tricky fast apertures (f1.4, f1.7).

My first post-kit lens purchases were to switch out the kit zoom for a SonyZeiss 18-80mm f3.5 and a Minolta 50mm f1.7. The Sony Zeiss brought immediate punch to all my shots, and the focal range could handle vacation shots, family snaps, & camera club walkabouts equally well. I liked the results so much that it was encouraging to shoot more. The 50mm -- well, I got some nice butterfly shots on the potted flowers, but no point stopping down to use it when I could use the zoom and get both variable f stops *and* variable focal lengths. I'm getting back to the 50mm f1.7 after 5 years, now that I have a better idea how to use it.

Last point: learning the nuances of camera's AF systems is complex enough. 399 af points, "Super Fast" af vs. "Fast Super" af, etc. The permutations are confusing.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 22:33 UTC
On article Buying a second lens: what lens should I buy next? (303 comments in total)

Having recently graduated from newbie status, I second Teila Day's recommendation to invest in a quality zoom over a fast prime. In the beginning, just learning the basic operations of the camera is overwhelming. Once you get comfortable with getting the exposure right, nailing the shutter speed, learning a few camera bells & whistles & basic post processing, then you can move on to the lens. The versatility of a zoom lets you play with wide angle, normal, & short telephoto compositions. You can quickly get a feel for the effects of different focal lengths. It's a great way to discover what kind of photography you enjoy doing. A fast prime, on the other hand, can have such a thin depth of field that it's not all that useable for a majority of situations. It works in low light, sure, but when your DOF is only a few inches, it's useless for taking pictures of your active dog or kids. And then there's the limit of a single focal length for various situations -- that gets stale.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2017 at 15:06 UTC as 30th comment | 2 replies

Happy Centennial, Nikon! You've brought much happiness & satisfaction to many, many photographers over the years. Here's to another 100 years.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 21:21 UTC as 126th comment
In reply to:

TwoMetreBill: Pollute the environment, use film.

Davinator, you forgot to mention spare camera batteries, chargers, lenses with built-in electronics, usb drives, sd cards, computers, tablets, phones, monitors, mice or Wacom tablets, printers, printer inks, & flashes & wireless flash devices, & the electricity needed to operate the devices. In comparison, a small contingent of film fans pouring 500ml of very dilute chemicals down a drain doesn't seem as bad.

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2017 at 22:46 UTC
In reply to:

FBoneOne: Nothing wrong with bringing this slide film back but as others have mentioned, development is not easy to find and is expensive. And ektachrome was not that unique of a look for me to really enjoy the hassle; in the end you have to scan them anyway to do anything as cibachrome printing is not available anymore. At least with B&W you can develop your own and print your own if you are brave enough...

Hmmm...large images, high quality. My camera club buddy has a Jobo developer. And I'll bet i could find an old carousel projector for cheap to show pictures on my white wall. This could be fun. I've never shot slide film before.

I love Fomapan 100 b&w film & developing it myself. I take a weekly darkroom class at an arts center too. It's relaxing.

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2017 at 22:22 UTC
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2016 (271 comments in total)
In reply to:

TN Args: Part 2
2. It's a sexist, 'boys-own' choice, and for that I strongly criticize DPR. Its forte is BIF and sports action, for which a minimum lens to reap the AF reward is something like the Nik 200-500 making a 3.2 kg / 7 lb package. That is not acceptable IMO and I discount macho stories of hand-holding such a combo for any length of time (and it is a minimum practical zoom for the job, many weigh much more). The occasional dedicated female staffer's willingness to tote such a weight is not an effective counter to the core seriousness of this problem. Far too many female photographers would be unable to consider this camera practical for hand-held use, and adding a tripod of the substance needed for this type of combo is actually an exacerbation, not a solution. The effective exclusion, or discounting, of the needs of female photographers (and by extension many male photographers too -- like I say, I discount macho/hero tales of strength and endurance) is sexist. It's as simple as that.

There is nothing more sexist than an old fart posting a condescending comment that can only be interpreted as, "There, there, little lady, we know you're not up to the handling the equipment."

Margaret Bourke-White must be rolling over in her grave:
http://joemazzaphotography.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/TLF730270.jpg

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2016 at 01:38 UTC

The flower symbol is for taking pictures of things that are close. It is not for taking extra colorful pictures of flowers or gardens, which is what I thought it meant for many years.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2016 at 04:09 UTC as 17th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

steelhead3: The US has a long history of treating people of non-northern European as less than human (left over from the tribes of Europe) and even adopted English attitudes towards the Celtic immigrants. The beginning of Concentration Camps were called Reservations for the native American inhabitants where we starved them into submission. If we recognize our shortcomings we can make sure it never happens again.

"The beginning of Concentration Camps were called Reservations..."

It didn't start in the U.S. with mistreatment of the Native Americans (Who weren't very tolerant of other tribes either.) Humans have a long sad history of enslavement and ethnic cleansing:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ethnic_cleansing_campaigns

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/07/18/books/books-of-the-times-even-in-eden-it-seems-war-was-hell.html

Decent people recognize their shortcomings to make sure such mistreatment never happens again. But there always seems to be plenty of indecent people who think using violence & subjugation to advance their agenda is very useful. It's the nature of the human beast. There's a famous quotation attributed (apocryphally) to Trotsky: "You may not be interested in war, but war is very interested in you."

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2016 at 17:00 UTC
In reply to:

StevenE: Sad as it is, it was war. And not just any war, but a world war and an attack on American soil. The Japanese, the Germans, and the Italians were all treated this way. Espionage was a big concern.
BTW ... most people express heightened "empathy" for the woman mostly because she's young and pretty. I think the photos are important and moving, but the virtue-signalling in the comments here is not compelling.

"ALL Japanese Americans were rouned up and put into camps. "

No, not correct.
"More than 110,000 Japanese Americans, who mostly lived on the West Coast, were forced into interior camps, but in Hawaii, where the 150,000-plus Japanese Americans composed over one-third of the population, 1,200 to 1,800 were interned.[8] "

Wikipedia article "Internment of Japanese Americans," citation from Ogawa, Dennis M. and Fox, Jr., Evarts C. Japanese Americans, from Relocation to Redress. 1991, page 135.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2016 at 16:16 UTC
On article TIME releases 100 most influential images of all time (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

KKJohn: Where is Eugene Smith's photo of mother bathing her son in the Japanese Minamata mercury poisoning? That had an amazing impression on me at the time, and besides being a great photo, it helped start community and government action against the dangers of industrial pollution.

Aileen Mioko Smith gave the photo rights to the Uemura family, who have retired the photo. I assume Life couldn't get permission to republish it.

Link | Posted on Nov 18, 2016 at 17:36 UTC
On article TIME releases 100 most influential images of all time (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

nikonf2as: What TIME, and America, has perhaps forgotten is that there is another world out there; people who don't share North America's insular world view, and it's recording of. We're quite scared of your ignorance - this "100 most influential" is truthful (in a cliched way) about the brutality and banality of US stupidity, yes; but - my point - there's a black hole where life could have been celebrated from others - no Diane Arbus, no Robert Frank, no Minor White, no Ed Ruscha, no Berenice Abbott - and that's just some of the alternative US options. Of course TIME haven't been able to show these photographers as they are not part of their canon - so, why say "all time"? When what they actually mean is "some pics, some of a flippant nature, from our archive. Buy our book and feel good about Stephen Bannon - maybe we'll get some more pics of world chaos under his leadership".

11 likes so far for nikonf2as' post, but I can't even decipher what he/she is saying because it's written so poorly.

"but - my point - there's a black hole where life could have been celebrated from others" A black hole is an abyss from which there is no return. No celebrating going on there. Did you mean to say Life's selection of photos represents too narrow a perspective, in your oppinion?

Link | Posted on Nov 18, 2016 at 17:22 UTC
In reply to:

contadorfan: "You've got this thing sticking halfway out."

Quelle horreur!

And if you have to buy a SD to USB reader, then you've REALLY got a thing sticking out.

"Hmmmm, but yet it dosen't seem to stick halfway out of any of my cameras?"

Of course it doesn't. But my SD doesn't stick out of my laptop, either.

If I buy a mac lap, now I'd have to buy a USB/SD card reader, which means another device that I'd better not lose or I'm screwed AND one that would jut out of my "elegant" mac lap. The illogic is baffling.

Apple just wanted to slash their costs by eliminating the SD slot.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2016 at 21:02 UTC

"You've got this thing sticking halfway out."

Quelle horreur!

And if you have to buy a SD to USB reader, then you've REALLY got a thing sticking out.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2016 at 18:19 UTC as 411th comment | 12 replies
On photo Full Moon aver the old City in the Your City - Moon over the City challenge (9 comments in total)

Magnificent photo.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2016 at 00:31 UTC as 9th comment

This puts a new spin on things.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 18:36 UTC as 203rd comment
In reply to:

FLruckas: We'll see what the BM, RED, and Arri people have to say about these.

Not all IR ND filters are equal, for sure.

Hoping they're good.

Thank you. I appreciate your having taken time for details.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 23:48 UTC
In reply to:

FLruckas: We'll see what the BM, RED, and Arri people have to say about these.

Not all IR ND filters are equal, for sure.

Hoping they're good.

What do BM & RED mean? Apologies for my ignorance.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 14:36 UTC
In reply to:

dbo: I am using a B&W ND110 and I also have the big stopper for my LEE system. So far I encountered issues if at all on uwa lenses. In order to prevent unnecessary vignetting I use slim filter versions or the wa adapters for my LEE system.
This HOYA series looks like quite high framed filters I would probably not use for uwa lenses.

Agree to many that a comparison of high quality NDs would be appreciated.

What's a LEE system?

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2016 at 14:35 UTC
On article Aura is a next generation digital picture frame (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

contadorfan: I still love a digital photo frame for displaying my work and family pictures. But I want a bigger frame than this, and 4K too.

PatsyK, thanks for pointing out Anders' post! Now, that's more like it :) I don't really need the wi fi connectedness, because good ol' sd cards are fine. I need to use those small slow sd cards I bought 10 years ago somehow! One thing I like a digital frame for is to fill an sd card with pictures of Christmases past or scanned Christmas cards, and run the display during the winter holidays.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2016 at 20:39 UTC
On article Aura is a next generation digital picture frame (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

contadorfan: I still love a digital photo frame for displaying my work and family pictures. But I want a bigger frame than this, and 4K too.

TV is for tv. I want a digital frame to hang on my wall or to put on a table to enjoy my pictures without having the thing blazing in my face or my guests'. TV displays are great for *me* to view photos, but for guests, it's too much. I've yet to have an audience that was super eager to see all 700 of my latest vacation photos :/ But with a digital frame, it's more discrete. People can view it or tune it out as they wish, and I can put it where it doesn't dominate the room like a tv.

I just love my current digital frame for the above reasons. It's wonderful to randomly walk by, pause a few seconds, & enjoy the show.

Link | Posted on Oct 4, 2016 at 18:03 UTC
Total: 141, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »