fmian

fmian

Lives in Australia Sydney, Australia
Works as a Photographer/Re-toucher/Consultant
Joined on Mar 28, 2010
About me:

If you're reading this it's probably because I wrote something that confounded or intrigued you. You should know that much of what I say is uncomfortable truth laced with straight faced sarcasm. Don't take it to heart.

Comments

Total: 994, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

dash2k8: The transition may be clunky, but with technology advancing so quickly, is it hard to believe that one year from now we'll see a solution that perfectly marries DSLR lenses with mirrorless bodies? Every year we see new tech that blows our minds, and so nothing seems impossible at this point. Let's wait and see.

I was talking about the Bayer filter.
Most camera based tech from the last 30 years has been a crutch for the photographers lack of ability. Meanwhile the look of base ISO output has barely changed, if at all.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 11:51 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: The transition may be clunky, but with technology advancing so quickly, is it hard to believe that one year from now we'll see a solution that perfectly marries DSLR lenses with mirrorless bodies? Every year we see new tech that blows our minds, and so nothing seems impossible at this point. Let's wait and see.

Camera technology is not advancing quickly. We're still using the same design from 30+ years ago, just pushing out more interpolated pixels through it and striving to make it automated.
The mirrorless/DSLR/pixyphone debate is irrelevant. It's just mindless mush to keep you preoccupied with what you should be spending your money on next.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 05:13 UTC
On article Nikon reshuffles management structure (244 comments in total)
In reply to:

P Hartung: I came here for my daily article on the Sony A9 and got nothing. Damn...

Don't lose hope P Hartung, you might be seeing the inklings of Sony buying their new toy company.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 02:25 UTC
On article Nikon reshuffles management structure (244 comments in total)

If this is a sign of their demise then good riddance I say.

Their poor reaction to QA issues was to their own and their customers detriment.
Their reps I dealt with where pompous a-holes with an 'us vs them' mentality.
They flogged their gear on TV with a guy who didn't even know how to use their cameras.
They showed no interested in supporting our government photographic educational institutes.

Obviously all that spells out the popular notion that cr*p rolls downhill through a companies hierarchy structure.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2017 at 23:52 UTC as 6th comment
On article FilmLab is a film negative scanning app for smartphones (109 comments in total)
In reply to:

David Mantripp: The comments here are just remarkable. The fundamental point, and value in a workflow of immediate visualisation of negatives on a light table seems to have flown straight over all the know-it-alls heads. The assumption that the FilmLab developer is a complete idiot, or some kind of charlatan, who has no idea of the app market or of what is already out there is arrogant beyond belief.

Well, whatever. He's got my contribution. If he can make the app work then the amount of time it will save me is easily worth the tiny amount of money he's asking for.

The rampant, enthusiastic negativity in the DPReview community is really sad.

David, there are cheaper apps that will get you immediate visualization.
Paying more for the overkill of RAW output and the sloppy method he uses in the video is what makes this a joke.

Consumer products typically fall into two categories.

Does the job properly and costs a lot more.
or
Doesn't do the job properly but is dirt cheap.

This one falls into the extra special category of:

Pretends to do the job properly and charges you more.

Link | Posted on May 16, 2017 at 02:59 UTC
On article FilmLab is a film negative scanning app for smartphones (109 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alwina H: Here is a cheap alternative -if you have a macro lens.
http://friedmanarchives.blogspot.be/2017/02/turn-your-ipad-into-high-resolution.html
(= Use a tablet as a lighttable and put the negative on a piece of glass above it.)

In my experience using just a scanners negative carrier doesn't give you enough distance to ensure the screen pixels are out of focus. I suspect even if it was out of focus you may see signs of the RGB array pattern of the monitor embedded into your copy shot.

Hence why the article suggests using spacers to separate the screen from the film by a few inches.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2017 at 00:38 UTC
On article FilmLab is a film negative scanning app for smartphones (109 comments in total)
In reply to:

newe: What stupidity....get a scanner. I'm laughing my fingers off.

Technically, you're not scanning it with a digital camera. You're copying it.
Semantics aside, purpose built scanners will not have any of the limitations of the Bayer Filter found on a digital camera.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2017 at 12:24 UTC
On article FilmLab is a film negative scanning app for smartphones (109 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alwina H: Here is a cheap alternative -if you have a macro lens.
http://friedmanarchives.blogspot.be/2017/02/turn-your-ipad-into-high-resolution.html
(= Use a tablet as a lighttable and put the negative on a piece of glass above it.)

The film is put on top of the glass, not between the glass and the screen.
So instead of Newton rings you have the issue of curled film to deal with.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2017 at 03:27 UTC
On article FilmLab is a film negative scanning app for smartphones (109 comments in total)
In reply to:

ms18: I don't really understand people still like / shoot film. Because an escalator can be used as steps as well. Shoot digital turn off auto preview. Do not see the images in back screen bring them home and see in computer only. If you need just take the camera to super market comeback then view it in your PC to simulate you went to studio to develop it. don't shoot more than 24/34 pictures. Now you get the feeling of shooting film. Fuji cameras are more like mechanical cameras.

If you can't control mind. Go to a meditation club. Do not shoot film to learn calmness.

In this video he says he has problem with negative scanners. No there is no problem with scanners. Problem is applying chemicals to the film before we could scan.

'I don't really understand...'
- It looks different and the characteristics can't be simulated. Compared to the Bayer Filter/Sensor there is a big difference.

'More like mechanical cameras'
- No. A mechanical camera doesn't need a battery and has no circuitry, so it's less complex, more reliable and lasts longer.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2017 at 03:16 UTC
In reply to:

LarryK: Yeah, mine showed up with a big fat thumbprint on the sensor.

Never liked that camera.

There's an idea for a signature watermark.. :)

Link | Posted on May 5, 2017 at 02:09 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Some dinosaurs still had happy moments soon after Earth was hit by a meteor. Today's meteor is the mirrorless revolution.

@fujica
'As you say 'a perfectly perfect camera'.
- I literally did NOT say this.

'I also see many people come into our store and swap their DSLR for a mirrorless system.'
'As a matter of fact many people start to see that their FF camera doesn't make better pictures then their previous APS-C camera did.'

- The two above statements you make are contradicted by this one and it's almost as if you're disagreeing with yourself:
'I see many 5D MKIII users come in and walk out of the store with a Mark 4'

'So I am sorry to say but you are completely wrong.'
- Meanwhile you totally misquote me and your only perspective seems to be from this 'store' of yours with your subjective definition of the term 'many'.
How many is many?

Actually.. don't answer that question unless you're able to compare it to something totally irrelevant like the amount of blueberry muffins sold annually. That might help you make more sense.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2017 at 23:07 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Some dinosaurs still had happy moments soon after Earth was hit by a meteor. Today's meteor is the mirrorless revolution.

@fujica
You're not taking into account two things:

- The SLR/DSLR tech has been close to perfect for users for a long time already. So users are less inclined to buy a new model often. Whereas mirrorless tech has been slowly fixing it's problems with every iteration.

- The increase in people buying and using analog cameras.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2017 at 10:00 UTC
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Some dinosaurs still had happy moments soon after Earth was hit by a meteor. Today's meteor is the mirrorless revolution.

Most meteors break apart in the atmosphere and whither into dust before they can even make an impact.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 03:21 UTC

'Minimum focus distance of just 3 cm'
'Length of lens 56 mm'

Huh?
Typo?

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2017 at 02:48 UTC as 11th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

samfan: Foveon ftw.

I really don't understand what's all the excitement about bayer filtering. Sure it was a nice idea but it should've been replaced with something like Foveon ages ago. It hasn't only because it's the cheapest and simplest hardware solution.

Software solutions are cheap, so all those inherent problems such as low color resolution, aliasing and all that can be done outside of the sensor.

No, bayer filtering is not good. You appreciate it only if you've not seen anything better. Foveon provides better resolution and no aliasing. Native b&w sensors such as in Leica M mono blow bayer out of the water with monochromatic resolution and sensitivity.

Let's call it what it is. Bayer filtering is nothing but a compromise between affordability and acceptable quality. It made it possible to produce color cameras in mass quantity and I guess the idea itself is kind of genius but it's outdated as hell.

(And yes I know Foveon has its own problems. I still prefer that kind of solution.)

@mgrum
'Can you explain how "lighting subjects adequately" would help with the need to shoot the milky way at ISO 3200? '

How about celestial tracking devices to eliminate light trails?

'Or F1 cars racing on a street circuit at night?'

Have you ever heard of motion panning to freeze a fast moving subject?

'The idea that higher ISOs are only necessary because people are too lazy to light things properly is incredibly narrow minded.'

Your comment only serves as an example of how basic first year photographic student techniques are being disregarded because of an expectation that the camera is going to do all work instead of the photographer.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 22:01 UTC
In reply to:

samfan: Foveon ftw.

I really don't understand what's all the excitement about bayer filtering. Sure it was a nice idea but it should've been replaced with something like Foveon ages ago. It hasn't only because it's the cheapest and simplest hardware solution.

Software solutions are cheap, so all those inherent problems such as low color resolution, aliasing and all that can be done outside of the sensor.

No, bayer filtering is not good. You appreciate it only if you've not seen anything better. Foveon provides better resolution and no aliasing. Native b&w sensors such as in Leica M mono blow bayer out of the water with monochromatic resolution and sensitivity.

Let's call it what it is. Bayer filtering is nothing but a compromise between affordability and acceptable quality. It made it possible to produce color cameras in mass quantity and I guess the idea itself is kind of genius but it's outdated as hell.

(And yes I know Foveon has its own problems. I still prefer that kind of solution.)

'So we can all go back to being limited to ISO400 *and lighting our subjects adequately* like the film days?'

I fixed that for you.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 04:06 UTC
In reply to:

Class A: The title should start "Thinking about buying a crop medium format camera?". However, that would be admitting that the current baby-MF format cameras do not have sensors of the size of what traditionally has been referred to as "MF".

Of course, companies like Fuji like the idea of "MF" not referring to a particular size, but there is no denying that film cameras like the Pentax 645 had a much bigger image format and that the current baby-MF sensors that are hardly worth having over a standard FF (135mm format) camera.

@ Leandros 'I believe the only options for "real 645"'

What about all the 645 film cameras that can be purchased for a couple hundred bucks? Are they not 'real' cameras anymore?

@ quietrich 'Medium format has never referred to a particular size - just roll-film rather than 135.'

What 5" roll film? Is that medium format as well?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/KODAK-5in-x-350ft-AEROGRAPHIC-DUPLICATING-B-W-ROLL-FILM-2421-126mmx107m-4x5-7-/140618198291#vi-content?afsrc=1&rmvSB=true

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 22:54 UTC
On article Erez Marom: On causality in landscape photography (108 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): You see "imagined causality" used in street photography a lot.

Interesting choice of words for this write up Erez :)

It was taught to me as 'implied line'.
ie. presenting relationships between visually disconnected elements in order to draw the eye from one to the other, and (hopefully) tell a story.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 15:42 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S Review: Modern MF (901 comments in total)
In reply to:

Shlomo Goldwasser: I am disappointed.

Pentax K-1 is a quarter of the price, but delivers much better results.

Compare the K-1 on pixel shift w/ low ISO to the Sigma Quattro and it starts to look soft and mushy.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 22:14 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S Review: Modern MF (901 comments in total)

So Sigma Quattro is still the benchmark in terms of depth and clarity... nice..

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 22:07 UTC as 189th comment | 3 replies
Total: 994, showing: 1 – 20
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