Ty Audronis

Ty Audronis

DPReview Contributor
Lives in United States Katy, TX, United States
Works as a Post Production, VFX, and Drones
Has a website at http://www.audronis.com
Joined on Nov 21, 2016
About me:

Since Ty was very young he had two passions: Aircraft and media...

From sitting in a room plastered with posters of military aircraft to making home movies with his Super 8 film camera; Ty has always dreamed of combining his two loves. Ty enlisted in the Navy in 2001, serving in a helicopter squadron aboard the USS Independence in Yokosuka Japan. There, he also fell in love with animation.

After majoring in visual effects in college, Ty got involved in the dot-com boom in the early 2000s. His innate knowledge of programming and computer technology took hold, and Ty envisioned a media world converging on the internet with amazing computer graphics supporting free-floating robotic aerial cameras. Ty began crafting radio-controlled helicopters with cameras mounted on them.

Ty continued his media career, and has managed to fuse his love for all media and aircraft into many successful ventures. Ty currently writes books on his many areas of expertise and acts as a consultant to others venturing into the media and drone worlds. He also still performs shoots with drones, provides post-production services, and educates others.

Comments

Total: 89, showing: 1 – 20
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On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (133 comments in total)
In reply to:

BelePhotography: how good are these consumer drones in cold weatherm does anyone know? the working temperatures advertised leave a lot to be desired if you live in colder winter climates.

The drones do function better in cold (heavier) air, and the motors stay much cooler, which improves their efficiency. However, the batteries may have issues with cold weather, and should be kept warm (in a jacket pocket, etc.)

Link | Posted on Nov 18, 2017 at 14:43 UTC
On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (133 comments in total)

Thank you (all) for your comments. I think it's important to recognize that the Spark was intended as a direct competitor to the Yuneec Breeze and other "selfie" drones. In that respect, it is definitely the top of this market. However, for this price point, there may be better options available for photography. It really depends on the points of design that you value.

Link | Posted on Nov 18, 2017 at 14:42 UTC as 8th comment
On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (133 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: The darkened-out bit about the remote is also WRONG. You CAN connect it to your phone/tablet should you so wish, with the appropriate OTG cable.

Notwithstanding which, the DJI Spark is an AMAZING tiny drone, which takes incredibly good photos and videos.

Brian

True that you can connect that way. However, it is not the "standard" method of connection."

Link | Posted on Nov 18, 2017 at 14:37 UTC
On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (133 comments in total)
In reply to:

Coliban: In my opinion, a much better starting point for the "wonderful world of drones" is : go out, buy the parts and build a drone by yourself. Get the APM/Ardupilot Controller, get a GPS device, buy some frames, maybe from Tarot get a radio system and put it all together. That is the real thing for a real man (and, of course, woman), not threwing money out of the window for another plaything. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHXHB2SSM48 (quality of this 4 year old video is much better than shown, this was only a technical demonstration for me).

Ok, if you only want good photos, then this drone would also be a good starting point, very nice.

Although I agree with the OP on this thread, I certainly understand that some people would rather just buy and fly. I have found though that people who have experience building and tuning their own drones have far more respect for how dangerous and volatile they are, and are therefore better pilots.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 08:00 UTC
On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (133 comments in total)
In reply to:

raztec: I can't understand why the Drone manufacturers, instead of including their own camera, which too often has a very small sensor, don't just make a drone that has the ability to carry any small, compact point & shoot or action cam in a cargo bay. That way we can use our own cameras and get much better quality photos and they can reduce the costs and complexity of the drone.

Higher end drones can carry any camera you like (when you start getting up int the Matrice range with DJI for example). Just count on a large drone, a truck or trailer to carry all of the gear in, and spending at least $12,000 for one that is worth a darn. If you're talking GoPro range, just about every drone carried that about 4 years ago. But the GoPro is not very aerodynamic, and caused burnouts on gimbal motors. Plus, the lens distortion of a GoPro is pretty much intolerable.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 07:47 UTC
On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (133 comments in total)
In reply to:

chadley_chad: Sorry, but how can you call the concluding list of cons ‘cons’ when they’re simply features it doesn’t have! lack of 4K might deliver lower resolution than the Mavic, but that’s why the Mavic exists. The Spark was designed without 4K, so how can not having it be a con ... likewise for most others on the list. If you’re going to adopt that attitude, why not start with ‘unable to fly for 4 hour’ and Finish with ‘too small to be carried in both hands’ and ‘you don’t get guards or a lifetime supply of beer with it’.

This feature (or lack thereof) is listed as a con as every other drone in this class does shoot 4K (Yuneec Breeze, etc).

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 07:44 UTC
On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (133 comments in total)
In reply to:

Andrew: Anyone know if the Mavic controller would work with the Spark?

A

It does not. The Spark controller looks similar, but works in a completely different way.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 07:42 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)

Look people. I think we may have gone off the rails here. Let's bring it back. This article doesn't apply to the "idiots" out there breaking the law. It doesn't apply to hobbyists nor racers. It applies to FAA certified professionals that also have insurance and have demonstrated their ability and desire to follow the law. For a manufacturer (not even based in the country who's laws it is "enforcing") to impose restrictions above and beyond the law on those professionals is uncalled for. There are (quite literally) a plethora of stories out there of DJI drones failing on an FAA authorized set as the result of this. From the set of "American NInja Warrior" to feature film sets, to real estate shoots. This is costing serious money and reputation points to registered professionals. Is a system like this good for hobbyists? Nobody is against that. For professionals? That's the question.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2017 at 02:44 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

Greenalux: Adding a layer of collision prevention, If drones this days are so sensor smart and software smart, why do not develop a sensor that reads the transponder of any near by airplanes, in order to set a safety distance between the drone and the plane automatically, if the drone is in a dangerous collision course. Basically drones will move away from the planes path. Just a thought.

There are a few companies working on this exact idea. The difficulty they're having is the speed of the airplane, and the range of the reciever matched with enough processing power to plot the vectors in real time.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 20:03 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

W16GYM: I have a question - The DJI Spark is "an entry-level product aimed at casual users" and "has been designed to be the perfect lifestyle accessory you can take anywhere" - in relation to the above article would this firmware now mean it will not be able to fly in most Urban parks (Central Park - NYC, Hyde Park - LDN)?

If they're in DJI restricted zones... you are correct. You would not be able to fly.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 20:00 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

CurlyBen: My previous comment has been buried (it took a while to get moderated) but I'd be very interested to hear the author explain why, as a part 107 licensed professional with 14 years of drone experience, he still can't identify airspace correctly. If he can't, how likely is it other drone operators can?

Controlled by faa. Restricted by DJI. I can understand your confusion...

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 19:59 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alan WF: Why did you publish this without contacting DJI for their opinion?

I reached out to DJI. They gave no response.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 19:58 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

shuttertothink: This is not true for Part 107 pilots: "...one way to get around these restrictions is to call the tower responsible for the airspace and give them an advisement of when you’ll be flying, and for how long. They’ll come back and let you know if you’re cleared or not." Part 107 pilots must apply for a waiver (online form) and wait up to 90 days for an answer. Ironically, hobbyists can indeed call the tower to get clearance in minutes. That is so wrong at so many levels. That's "back-asswards". It should be the other way around. Why is the FAA punishing pilots that presumably have a better understanding of airspace??

Shutter: also from the study guide: The most comprehensive information on a given airport is provided by
A. the Chart Supplements U.S. (formerly Airport Facility Directory). [This will tell you all sorts of things. Ever wonder how you get the phone number of the airport manager to make phone calls if you are flying within 5nm of an airport?]

The [] part of answer a is the explaination of why... so although the test never says to call... The chart supplements are how you do it.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 07:30 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

davemac00: I think Brendan from DJI has addressed the concerns pretty well below.

Unfortunately Ty has moved on from specific issues and to a general whinge about "who gave DJI the right..." - well quite simply DJI has the right to build its drones how it likes and if you don't like it plenty of other companies will be happy to take your money.

I don't think Brendan realizes what Dave just did to DJI. By thanking him... Brendan basically endorsed the idea of "screw what existing customers want... don't like it... go somewhere else" Thank you Brendan and Dave for illustrating my points in the article. Honestly... I was hoping I was wrong.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 04:45 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

davemac00: I think Brendan from DJI has addressed the concerns pretty well below.

Unfortunately Ty has moved on from specific issues and to a general whinge about "who gave DJI the right..." - well quite simply DJI has the right to build its drones how it likes and if you don't like it plenty of other companies will be happy to take your money.

Dave... don't you find it funny that DJI's vp of legal affairs is on this forum? Not PR (traditionally in charge of the press and public)? It just so happens that this head of legal affairs also is the man behind GEO?

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 04:39 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: DJI should've stuck to FAA zones for consumer products and either not applied the same firmware to higher end pro grade drones or simply applied a one time Part 107 verification, that email runaround is ludicrous.

And... who said it's your duty to verify that someone is the actual FAA registered pilot who has FAA authorization? Are you saying that requesting a token verifies that you're cleared with FAA. Because we both know it does not. Distractions. You do not have the authority to enforce the law... bottom line. That is the FAA. You are not a government authority. As far as I know... the citizens of the US have not relinquished law enforcement to private companies. But hey... you're the lawyer.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 04:37 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: DJI should've stuck to FAA zones for consumer products and either not applied the same firmware to higher end pro grade drones or simply applied a one time Part 107 verification, that email runaround is ludicrous.

amen captain chaos...

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 04:32 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aroart: DJI should and can do what ever they like.. Stop complaining , if you want to be a pro, build one on your own and do what you like...

Agreed on the last part... but that first sentence... huh? Wonder if you'd feel the same if you couldn't pick up your kids from school in your car because it's not safe to drive around kids, so XXX motor company decided to disable your car in school zones... AFTER you bought it.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 01:38 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

fedway: No one is forced to buy a DJI. Buy some other brand if you don't like their policies.

Dash and fedway... these are not existing rules... these are NEW rules perpetrated (sometimes years) after buying the equipment.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 01:20 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (404 comments in total)
In reply to:

shuttertothink: This is not true for Part 107 pilots: "...one way to get around these restrictions is to call the tower responsible for the airspace and give them an advisement of when you’ll be flying, and for how long. They’ll come back and let you know if you’re cleared or not." Part 107 pilots must apply for a waiver (online form) and wait up to 90 days for an answer. Ironically, hobbyists can indeed call the tower to get clearance in minutes. That is so wrong at so many levels. That's "back-asswards". It should be the other way around. Why is the FAA punishing pilots that presumably have a better understanding of airspace??

THAT is greatly dependent on the airspace classification, shutter. The 107 exam itself states to contact the tower. Brendan... for shame perpetrating a myth for your own gain. It's true with major airports... NOT for all.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 01:19 UTC
Total: 89, showing: 1 – 20
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