shigzeo

shigzeo

Lives in Japan Chiba, Japan
Works as a Writer, Audio Critic
Has a website at http://ohm-image.net
Joined on Sep 14, 2010
About me:

utterly impressionable

Comments

Total: 700, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Charles2: A suggestion about terms: no photography enthusiast nor professional buys an X-Pro for snapshots. The connotation of "snapshot" is so casual that it is not really a photograph. Reportage, street shooting, yes; snapshot no (and few people use a term like "snap-shooting").
--From a happy enthusiast owner of the X-Pro cameras.

@SmilerGrogan: I have a few questions:

1. Why is it the _West_ has to apologise for the use of ridiculous _English_, a language native to only one European country in the world? (In other words, is the responsibility for the learning of a language not the learner's?)

2. How in the blazes should a website be held responsible for the poor use of a common language? Let me guess, it isn't important for Japanese camera makers, whose primary customer base is the world, to use proper English (if English is a specific market's language)?

3. This has nothing to do with the rest of the world. Your 'evil am I' masochism berates the party representative of the target market on the one hand, while giving a pass to the lazy marketing and translation skills of a global company.

But, if progressives know one thing, it is this: West is bad in all things. Things not Western are automatically good, and deserve unfettered forgiveness for things for which the West deserves endless blame and ridicule.

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2016 at 04:56 UTC
In reply to:

Charles2: A suggestion about terms: no photography enthusiast nor professional buys an X-Pro for snapshots. The connotation of "snapshot" is so casual that it is not really a photograph. Reportage, street shooting, yes; snapshot no (and few people use a term like "snap-shooting").
--From a happy enthusiast owner of the X-Pro cameras.

@SmilerGrogan: but it's not a nuance of another language. It is literally snapshot from English phoneticised for Japanese. The word is スナップショット, or 'snapshot'. It was taken from English, used in a different connotation, and is now the subject of this misunderstanding.

Japanese has a long and effective history of removing words it likes from other languages, and using them exactly as it sees fit, which often make no sense to speakers of the original languages.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 06:46 UTC
In reply to:

bluevellet: Our goal is to make money.

In the long-game, focusing on customers's needs _is_ a focus on the bottom line. But you have to know _who_ your customer is and should focus narrowly on their needs rathe than on pleasing everyone.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 23:46 UTC
In reply to:

BeaverTerror: Not interested in any move toward larger sensor sizes by Fuji. APS-C is the right balance between image quality, size, weight, and cost. I entered the Fuji system with the XT-1 when it was first released. At the time it was either the Fuji or a Sony A7.

I'm mostly a prime shooter. Let's look at the three most important prime focal lengths from both manufacturers.

35mm:
Fuji has the 23mm F1.4 (around F1.87 equivalent) at $900
Sony has the 35mm F1.4 at $1600, or the 35mm F2.8 at $800.
Comment: The fast Sony lens is difficult to justify and the slow Sony lens is absurdly overpriced. Fuji wins.

50mm:
Fuji has the 35mm F1.4 (around F1.87 equivalent) at $600
Sony has the 50mm F1.4 at $1500; the 50mm F1.8 at $250; and the 55mm F1.8 at $1000
Comment: Sony has this focal length well covered and wins.

85mm:
Fuji has the 56mm F1.2 (F1.6 equivalent) at $1000
Sony has the 85mm F1.4 at $1800
Comment: Almost double the price to go from F1.6 to F1.4? I don't think so.
Fuji wins

And, when in doubt, double down.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 23:42 UTC
In reply to:

stevenbrantley: Fuji execs differentiate the two camera bodies by saying the $1,699 "Pro" branded X-Pro2 is for "snapshooting" and mainly for use with prime lens, which is the majority of the Fujinon X series lens options. So how is the new X-T2, priced at $100 less, and with far fewer zoom lens options to accompany (according the the Fuji execs comments), a general wal;k around snapshooter camera, whereas the X-T2 for "professional" photographers? Just judging by the lens line-up comprised mainly of primes, Fuji is doing some doublespeak. With the X-Pro2's upcoing firmware upgrade in October 2016, the X-T2's superior focusing will transfer over the the X-Pro2 (except for the Custom setting feature). snapshooter verses a professional body. Fuji describing the X-Pro2 as a snapshooting camera sounds like a smart phone camera, but at $1,699 (with no phone).

Snap shooting is pose shooting. It's a Japanese mangling of English which doesn't make sense out side of Japan.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 23:03 UTC
In reply to:

Charles2: A suggestion about terms: no photography enthusiast nor professional buys an X-Pro for snapshots. The connotation of "snapshot" is so casual that it is not really a photograph. Reportage, street shooting, yes; snapshot no (and few people use a term like "snap-shooting").
--From a happy enthusiast owner of the X-Pro cameras.

'Snap' shooting in Japan is defined as the official poses you do at events with flashes. I used to work at a studio here, and at first, was confused by the importance placed on 'snap' sessions for school, event, and wedding photography.

It's a semantic thing that's more than lost in translation.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 22:48 UTC

Wow.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2016 at 00:54 UTC as 5th comment
On article Under pressure: Canon vs. Nikon in a hydraulic press (295 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: Back in the 70's it was Nikon vs Minolta vs Pentax vs Canon with Canon being last.

I'm sure it's a waste of dosh, but I'd love to see old 60's pro cameras: F2, SL2, etc., crushed using the same press.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2016 at 15:42 UTC
On article Under pressure: Canon vs. Nikon in a hydraulic press (295 comments in total)

That was great.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2016 at 15:40 UTC as 163rd comment
On article Retro through-and-through: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review (2478 comments in total)
In reply to:

JacquesBalthazar: A couple of months down the road now with my X-Pro2 and still agree with most of the facts and opinions of this review.

I just want to add my subjective bit: I am now certain that the X-Pro2 is the most enjoyable digital camera I have ever owned, FF included, and I just love the output it generates.

The JPEG OOC are almost always stunning, and the right raw processing tools produce equally brilliant results, if one decides to rebake pics in PP.

In summary, for me personally, the XPro2 easily beats any digital M (or any mirrorless I ever tried) from both the shooting experience (build, design, operation) and the IQ standpoints.

Really looking forward to the X-T2 now, hoping to leave DSLRs behind for good. Will depend mainly on the haptics: the design of additional grip and balance with the bigger zooms need improvement compared to X-T1. A slightly larger/heavier body would be nice. Assuming IQ will be on par with X-Pro2, and hoping speed of operation further improved... :-)

The X-Pro 2 is certainly faster than any digital M, but that goes without saying. The original X-Pro 1 debuted roughly at the same time as the M240 and was even slower to write, and so slow sometimes that 100% magnification, etc., took several tries.

As for build: are you sure you've handled an M240? It could be thrown through the X-Pro 2. I understand that the X-Pro 2 is monumentally more accurate (sensor-based AF is a nicety one doesn't forget), but the experience of shooting it will be idiosyncratic to the person shooting.

Personally, I prefer much simpler interfaces, and find the X-Pro 2 too button-friendly. It is a great camera, and, apart from a few extraneous buttons, the most true-to-form X camera out there. But let's not kid ourselves.

As to IQ: sure. The M240 at high ISO isn't great. But its DNGs are faster to process, compatible out of the box with most any software, and industry accepted.

I'm still debating: SL or X-Pro 2.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2016 at 07:35 UTC
In reply to:

D200_4me: Lesson learned. You have to strip the EXIF info before putting the image online ;-)

A simple glance would have told you that it wasn't an image from a phone.

Link | Posted on Jul 6, 2016 at 07:22 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (802 comments in total)
In reply to:

LFPCPH: I have been thinking. The Hasselblad Xpan camera had 45mm 4.0 and a 90mm 4.0 lenses. Could the new 45mm 3.5 and 90mm 3.2 be the same lens designs ?

That is called motivated reasoning. By all means apply it to your hopes. But it means nothing beyond a wish to believe something.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 00:47 UTC
In reply to:

djanrd01: My question is who is the target audience for this camera and what real innovation have they done? It seems to me that they've developed a camera for deep pocketed enthusiasts who want to claim that they have a small mirrorless camera with the biggest sensor in the industry. They tried to sell rebranded Sony cameras with with the only innovation being a new body and their name for thousands of dollars above what the cameras originally cost and were rightly crucified in the market place.

@tkbslc: I think you mean hype.

Contrariwise, I think the hype is warranted. Just months ago, Hasselblad debuted the H6, which is as capable a MF dSLR as exists, trading punches with Phase One, some landing harder, some landing softer.

Enthusiasts didn't care.

The reason this camera deserves its hype is that it sits within the price range of enthusiasts (many of whom have purchased D3X and similarly priced bodies), comes with a new lens mount, a small body, honours the basic tech tenets of modern mirrorless cameras, while sporting a massive sensor. It doesn't appear to market what it can't achieve.

My problem with it is its lack of FPS shutter, meaning adapting it to tech and architectural cameras may be impossible, if not crazy expensive. Everything else is reasonable, simplified, and focused on shooting.

Brilliant, if flawed.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 01:50 UTC
In reply to:

PanoMax: It will be interesting to compare images created with this Hasselblad vs. those from the yet-to-be released Sigma sd Quattro H, considering both have the about same sized sensor. The Quattro I think might have the edge.

tkbslc: Those lenses tell us nothing. They are unique and exotic offerings for most dSLR mounts. Their existence says nothing of Sigma's sensors.

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2016 at 01:44 UTC
In reply to:

2JoeA7R2: Back to the future: My 4x5 Linhof has been mirrorless since I bought it in 1972.

You really showed 'em, 2JoeA7R2!

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 17:22 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: "The H system has better AF in low light, and a lot of photographers prefer an optical viewfinder." - interview

Non-mirrorless is the present. :-)

@justmeMN

I didn't understand Abaregi's response, either. Perhaps it was levelled at someone else.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 17:20 UTC
In reply to:

tedolf: Hasselblad should merge with Olympus. Then, Olympus could stop its full frame dreaming and stay focused on the 4/3 sensor and lenses. 4/3 users could skip right to medium format if they really need those kinds of DOF characteristics.

tEdolph

@Tommi K1:

What would be the point of Hasselblad making a 'lightweight usage' m4/3? That market is saturated already, and decidedly not the one typically to which Hasselblad users are attracted. In fact, is that market attracting anyone at all?

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 17:15 UTC
In reply to:

PanoMax: It will be interesting to compare images created with this Hasselblad vs. those from the yet-to-be released Sigma sd Quattro H, considering both have the about same sized sensor. The Quattro I think might have the edge.

I may be missing something, but it appears that the Quattro H uses an APS-H sized sensor, which would be less than half the size of the X1D's sensor.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 17:12 UTC
In reply to:

djanrd01: My question is who is the target audience for this camera and what real innovation have they done? It seems to me that they've developed a camera for deep pocketed enthusiasts who want to claim that they have a small mirrorless camera with the biggest sensor in the industry. They tried to sell rebranded Sony cameras with with the only innovation being a new body and their name for thousands of dollars above what the cameras originally cost and were rightly crucified in the market place.

In other words, "I am poisoning the pot against Hasselblad for former mistakes, and pardoning other mirrorless manufacturers" who, by dint of size-matters marketing, do exactly what Hasselblad are doing, but with smaller sensors, and with a completely different shutter/lens system.

I suppose you missed the part where this is a medium format digital camera the size of a large APS-C mirrorless camera, or small dSLR. High speed sync, GPS, most of the bells and whistles of modern cameras, with what appears to be forward-thinking system.

It doesn't matter that it doesn't cater to you, or that you don't get it. If you don't get the X1D, you can equally dismiss any mirrorless camera, while simultaneously throwing out features unique to the X1D.

Had this not been Hasselblad that debuted this camera, and someone else, the question would be: how would _you_ see the X1D vis-a-vis how you see it now.

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 17:11 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (802 comments in total)
In reply to:

ogl: http://www.theverge.com/2016/6/22/12005978/hasselblad-x1d-mirrorless-medium-format-hands-on

After this preview I feel that it's modern, stylish and fashion thing. Fun gear.
But I don't feel that it's photo tool. :)

The point of this is that the world does NOT share your opinion of what [a hipster camera] is. Now, if by the pejorative _hipster_ you meant _expensive_ or unfair, the definition depends upon a person's exchequer, any argument is mooted upon how much you've got in it, and how much you're willing to part with.

But you can't just bandy about a word willy nilly and expect people to 'get' what you mean. This camera is decidedly modern, and expensive, two things that typically don't fit 'hipster' irony or moral superiority.

In fact, if I read the marketing material right, this camera was made in Sweden, very probably by a white person; in other words, by dint of its origin, it neatly (and fantastically) falls under the progressive definition of 'racist'.

It is not a hipster camera. It is a serious tool designed not for tools (progressives or hipsters), but for working pros with the dosh for it, and for serious amateurs.

[edit]

Link | Posted on Jun 27, 2016 at 06:34 UTC
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