StevenE

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Feb 24, 2009

Comments

Total: 261, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »

I still have my Olympus stylus Epic !

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2016 at 03:45 UTC as 52nd comment

1-4 TB is fine for now, I'm more interested in bringing the cost of SSD's down

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2016 at 22:43 UTC as 36th comment
On article Brevite launches two new Incognito camera backpacks (23 comments in total)
In reply to:

G Sciorio: So take the bag hiking or street shooting. Then to access gear take the bag off, put the back side of the bag on a surface (which will pick up dirt) then put that dirty side of the bag back on your back?

I don't understand why backpacks don't open on the side of the bag that rests on your back or at min on the side.

I have two Lowepro bags that open from the strap side of the backpack

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2016 at 21:27 UTC
In reply to:

StevenE: I have a trick that prevents most thefts: whenever I set my backpack down I step one foot through a shoulder strap. If anyone grabs the bag, the strap is hooked around my leg. Thieves in these environments are only interested in fast grab and go. They will let go as soon as they see what's happened.
If I sit at a table, I snap the waist belt or sternum strap of the backpack through an opening on an adjacent chair (back or leg) or table. Nobody notices that this is done but any thief would have to drag a chair or table through the coffee shop to make off with my bag.

Seriously ... you really think a thief is going to drag a bag attached to a table out of a coffee shop? Fine ... do nothing, let your gear be vulnerable. Some people are too stupid to help

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2016 at 19:37 UTC
In reply to:

StevenE: I have a trick that prevents most thefts: whenever I set my backpack down I step one foot through a shoulder strap. If anyone grabs the bag, the strap is hooked around my leg. Thieves in these environments are only interested in fast grab and go. They will let go as soon as they see what's happened.
If I sit at a table, I snap the waist belt or sternum strap of the backpack through an opening on an adjacent chair (back or leg) or table. Nobody notices that this is done but any thief would have to drag a chair or table through the coffee shop to make off with my bag.

If you're in a coffee shop where you can expect someone to pull out a machete and chop off your hand, you're either crazy, stupid, or paranoid

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2016 at 19:35 UTC

I have a trick that prevents most thefts: whenever I set my backpack down I step one foot through a shoulder strap. If anyone grabs the bag, the strap is hooked around my leg. Thieves in these environments are only interested in fast grab and go. They will let go as soon as they see what's happened.
If I sit at a table, I snap the waist belt or sternum strap of the backpack through an opening on an adjacent chair (back or leg) or table. Nobody notices that this is done but any thief would have to drag a chair or table through the coffee shop to make off with my bag.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2016 at 18:29 UTC as 170th comment | 7 replies

TV's are getting bigger, you'll soon have an entire wall made of lcd (like in the novel Fahrenheit 451), and 8K or more will be necessary for clarity

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 05:46 UTC as 36th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

StevenE: Smaller battery? That is wrong on every level

Smaller than the S7. I was hoping greater than 4000

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2016 at 15:11 UTC

Smaller battery? That is wrong on every level

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2016 at 04:06 UTC as 22nd comment | 2 replies
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Philly: I want to video an interview inside a fairly noisy restaurant, and be able to capture the audio from both the interviewer and the interviewee. I have an Olympus E-M1 with a microphone jack input and some (inexpensive) lav mics. How can I set up the audio wiring to accomplish this? Do I need to purchase an external microphone like one of the higher end Zoom models with multiple microphone channel input? Is there a cheaper solution? Thanks to anyone who can help.

The cheapest high quality and spontaneous setup that I use is the Sennheiser MKE600 plugged directly into the XLR 1 jack on the camera using a 10 foot cord if standing and moving, or 25 foot cable if using tripod and sitting. The mic is in this shock mount (which I hold to prevent hand noises): http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/885660-REG/auray_dusm_1_universal_shock_mount.html/pageID/accessory

Hold the mic low and point upwards at the speaker (about 2 feet away from mouth. Three feet is ok too). The mic will pick up almost no sound other than the speaker. (cable avoids the expense and other issues associated with wireless transmitters).
You can use the battery powered option on the MKE-600 and XLR to 3.5mm adapter if using DSLR.
Boom pole use is good if you have someone to use it, and the do it properly. Some boompoles are noisy themselves.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 15:58 UTC
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Philly: I want to video an interview inside a fairly noisy restaurant, and be able to capture the audio from both the interviewer and the interviewee. I have an Olympus E-M1 with a microphone jack input and some (inexpensive) lav mics. How can I set up the audio wiring to accomplish this? Do I need to purchase an external microphone like one of the higher end Zoom models with multiple microphone channel input? Is there a cheaper solution? Thanks to anyone who can help.

Philly ... I have two of the single mic versions of the Polsen mic and it's ok, but you will have a problem with the mics picking up the other speaker and the delay between mics sounds ugly. Cardioid lavs or a single interview or shotgun mic will give much much better results.
I only use omni lavs for lecturers or one person recording now. If you want an omni lav mic use this one: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1212297-REG/aputure_a_lav_omnidirectional_lavalier_microphone.html ... it works in smart phones, cameras with plugin power AND it has a rechargeable power back that includes a headphone monitoring jack. The audio when using the power pack is very very good. This is a must have lavalier mic.
One other setup I use frequently for lecturers is a Zoom H1N with this lav mic: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/372513-REG/Olympus_145045_ME_15_Tie_Clip_Microphone.html
The H1N can be set on hold and placed in a pocket, so cheap wireless sound!

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 14:49 UTC
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Philly: I want to video an interview inside a fairly noisy restaurant, and be able to capture the audio from both the interviewer and the interviewee. I have an Olympus E-M1 with a microphone jack input and some (inexpensive) lav mics. How can I set up the audio wiring to accomplish this? Do I need to purchase an external microphone like one of the higher end Zoom models with multiple microphone channel input? Is there a cheaper solution? Thanks to anyone who can help.

PS .... The Microphone Madness dual cardioid lav mic records each mic to a separate channel, so speaker A is on the left channel, and speaker B is on the right.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2016 at 20:15 UTC
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

Philly: I want to video an interview inside a fairly noisy restaurant, and be able to capture the audio from both the interviewer and the interviewee. I have an Olympus E-M1 with a microphone jack input and some (inexpensive) lav mics. How can I set up the audio wiring to accomplish this? Do I need to purchase an external microphone like one of the higher end Zoom models with multiple microphone channel input? Is there a cheaper solution? Thanks to anyone who can help.

I've used two solutions effectively:
1. Sennheiser MKE-600, which can operate with an AA battery or phantom power. It's directional and the interviewer points it back and forth between speakers. It operates just fine 2 feet away. The Rode VideoMic pro works well for this too, and has an optional 20db pad so you can turn the camera preamps down low.
2. Microphone madness sells a dual cardioid lav mic with 3.5mm input for small cameras and audio recorders (about $110). This gives you two mics into one input, and the system takes plug-in power from the camera (if your camera offers plugin power) and provides it to both mics. You can't set the levels separately, but it still works well.
Most lavalier mics are omni-directional. The Omni mic on person A will pick up person B with a slight delay due to the extra distance, which introduces an ugly delay sound when you put both tracks together. This is a nightmare to fix in post. The cardioid mic does a good job of eliminating this problem.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2016 at 20:12 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)
In reply to:

StevenE: The sensor is only 22% wider than full frame.
For perspective, full frame is 62% wider than APS-C, and more than 100% as wider than MFT sensors.

manchumuq
.... I use width because a lot of the extra sensor area is in height, which I don't find as useful. FF is already only 3x2. Maybe you much prefer squarish pics.
Anyway ... your arrogant self-satisfied comment is about as old and overused as your rubber doll.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 13:29 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (803 comments in total)

This thing is barely medium format. The sensor is only 22% wider than full frame.
For perspective, full frame is 62% wider than APS-C, and more than 100% as wider than MFT sensors.
Previous Hasselblads were 50% wider than full frame

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 03:58 UTC as 156th comment | 8 replies
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1190 comments in total)

The sensor is only 22% wider than full frame.
For perspective, full frame is 62% wider than APS-C, and more than 100% as wider than MFT sensors.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 03:54 UTC as 31st comment | 15 replies
On article Western Digital announces My Passport Wireless Pro (50 comments in total)
In reply to:

Osa25: Just what I've been looking for, for summer travel. Should have been on the market earlier though - they will not get out out to all markets in time.

The original is junk. Not even reliable as a standard external drive

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2016 at 20:44 UTC

People question m4/3 format for good reason when we see lenses like this at US$1300.
This is equivalent to a FF 24 f/2.8, which can be had for Canon at US$550, less than half the price and it is smaller and lighter. Even more significantly, you can get a FF 24mm f/1.4 from Sigma for US$850, that's a US$450 savings, and there is, and likely never will be, a m4/3 equivalent to that!
So, although it has it's uses, micro 4/3 is a compromised format

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2016 at 04:53 UTC as 136th comment | 36 replies
In reply to:

ogl: It's just 24/2.8 FF lens analogue in terms of DOF.

Not 28 mmm , it's 24mm f/2.8 ... and yes it's a limitation of micro 4/3 with a crop factor of 2

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2016 at 04:15 UTC

This is exciting fundamental research, the kind of thing that can revolutionize imaging in 5 or 10 years

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 14:12 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
Total: 261, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »