leecamera

leecamera

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Works as a Photographer
Joined on Aug 2, 2009
About me:

Commercial, Portrait, Headshot, Events, Editorial photographer - based in London but shooting all over the world.

Comments

Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I hope people commenting here understand that, at least in Europe, you're already required to obtain a license and/or pay fees if you want to shoot in most cities/villages for commercial purposes.

The fact that many productions get away with not paying those when they can pass mostly unnoticed by being less than disruptive does not mean those provisions do not exist.

Positano is just following lead and justifiably so because of the interest-to-size ratio and the explosion of "production" outfits that cater for the exponational growth of media content.

Let's just hope that the authorities there are photography-educated enough to realize that not every DSLR-with-a-tripod user is a professional photographer gathering commercial-oriented content.

I remember when I was shooting in Thailand, customs said our paperwork was not in order for the 10 cases of kit we had. (It was). But our paperwork "could" be legal for a mere £500 - which I'm guessing was the considered limit before crews might put up a fight. It needed to be cash of course, and we were "legal."

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2017 at 12:51 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I hope people commenting here understand that, at least in Europe, you're already required to obtain a license and/or pay fees if you want to shoot in most cities/villages for commercial purposes.

The fact that many productions get away with not paying those when they can pass mostly unnoticed by being less than disruptive does not mean those provisions do not exist.

Positano is just following lead and justifiably so because of the interest-to-size ratio and the explosion of "production" outfits that cater for the exponational growth of media content.

Let's just hope that the authorities there are photography-educated enough to realize that not every DSLR-with-a-tripod user is a professional photographer gathering commercial-oriented content.

It's amazing. A European crew turns up in the centre of Nairobi and it's like a cash register has rung in the eyes of the local police.

We were warned by our experienced broadcast Kenyan fixer, (himself a TV journalist), and of course with 10 mins of shooting were were stopped by two police claiming we'd broken some fictitious law.

Our fixer explained to them that we were with him and as part of his local station we needed no permits, but strangely enough there was a fine to pay - in cash and on the spot, or a quick trip to the station was next.

The cash fine was £80 but we said we only had £40 (which we'd already prepared in advance). Amazingly, the fine was reduced to exactly £40 but we had to make the payment out of public sight.

After which we were now "legal" and free to film anything we wanted. mmm...

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2017 at 12:50 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I hope people commenting here understand that, at least in Europe, you're already required to obtain a license and/or pay fees if you want to shoot in most cities/villages for commercial purposes.

The fact that many productions get away with not paying those when they can pass mostly unnoticed by being less than disruptive does not mean those provisions do not exist.

Positano is just following lead and justifiably so because of the interest-to-size ratio and the explosion of "production" outfits that cater for the exponational growth of media content.

Let's just hope that the authorities there are photography-educated enough to realize that not every DSLR-with-a-tripod user is a professional photographer gathering commercial-oriented content.

No not true. I work as a commercial photographer and TV lighting cameraman and although there are some select areas in some European cities, (London has its Royal Parks for example and a few council designated green bits), pros are free to shoot almost anywhere as long as they're not a big team.

For example, the last two days I've been shooting live TV for a major broadcaster in Paris with light / tripod / IFB links / camera / LiveU unit and even though we were only 500m from a heavily armed government building and could see major landmarks in shot, we were undisturbed by officials and police.

In London's central Square Mile area the police have powers to stop us filming if a tripod goes down, but even then it is often just a polite request as to what we are doing.

Permits and licences come into play when you're looking at larger crews / teams, where interference with public comes into play.

I've been shooting for 20 years and been OK all over the world, (except Nairobi)

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2017 at 12:27 UTC

Did I read correctly that Bowens was actually in profit. It seems that sometimes being in profit isn't enough for some investors and they want more and quicker.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 09:08 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

Scottelly: I don't know much about Bowens, but they seem to be more expensive than Alien Bees, which are probably responsible for a number of strobe manufacturers going out of business. Too bad, because it looks like Bowens makes some good stuff. It's hard to believe they can't keep running, with all that they have in place (over 300 products listed at B&H - a few dozen in stock). It seems like the hard, up-hill work has already been done. I can't find Alien Bees at B&H at all.

Of course there is the cheaper competition, like Impact and Interfit, and a lot of buyers choose those, rather than the more expensive stuff. It could be that those companies are offering good enough equipment now that there's no need for most photographers to pay twice as much to upgrade later. When I started with a set of Impact 160 WS lights, they recharged to full power in 5 seconds. I thought I needed more speed, and I didn't take very good care of them, so when one stopped working, I bought a set of Alien Bees.

Alien Bees are I'm sure quite fine, but you'll not see them here in the UK, or I'm guessing, much of Europe.

There is always cheaper and always more expensive. Bowens were solid products with great customer service and the new Generation X were great quality.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 08:54 UTC
In reply to:

LiangMing: I use LED light to carry around easily, plus my new camera can handle high ISO in most situation without any lighting at all.

I do think that Bowens didn't innovate. Of course it's easy to say this without regard to the retooling and RnD costs associated with this. A company needs the revenue to expand and expansion can generate revenue. It can be a catch 22 situation. I had suggested a few developments that required almost minimal retooling which opened up a whole new product line, but they didn't even want to talk about it. Perhaps they were blinkered towards just developing what they knew. Easy for us all to stand back and be wise after the event of course.

They had just brought out the new Generation X lights which had some impressive specs. Alas, the photographic community often just wants to know how many watts, how many radio channels, is it LED...? And the improvements (which potentially put them in a new class) were probably glossed over and the Bowens mid-range reputation never elevated their new range to where it should have been.

Very sad. Hopefully some wise investor will take them on.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 08:38 UTC
In reply to:

LiangMing: I use LED light to carry around easily, plus my new camera can handle high ISO in most situation without any lighting at all.

I used Bowens for the first 7-8 years of my photographic career. Great mid-priced strobes and customer service second to none. Godox are pushing out some great products, but their customer service is zero (at least for us in the UK), so I would never have spent £££ on their more expensive stuff.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 08:38 UTC
In reply to:

LiangMing: I use LED light to carry around easily, plus my new camera can handle high ISO in most situation without any lighting at all.

Lighting is rarely used to just increase the amount of light. It is used to control the light. For this we need a variety of things and one of those is often power.

To those that say they shoot in daylight so no need for flashes, good luck controlling powerful the balance of daylight / ambient without resorting to a subject-blinding, flap-around reflector which has limited positional options.

Speedlights are lovely little things - I have 6 in my bag and a host of radio triggers for them. But there are many many times when only a larger strobe will do - for power, consistency and ability to keep flashing at full power all day long.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2017 at 08:37 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Canon EOS 5D (236 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jonathan Brady: I hope people who refer to it as "5DC" or "5D Classic" get out of bed in the morning, walk toward the bathroom, and stub their toes on the door frame as they're going to pee. Every morning. Forever.

I loved my 5D Classic. Friends often referred to it as the Classic 5D, but we agreed to shorten it to 5DC when we talked about it on forums. Certainly a classic in its time, that good old 5D. You could say, it was a 5D Classic...

Strangely, I've never stubbed my toe and the door frame remains my friend.

Ah, good times - me and my 5D Classic...

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 06:29 UTC
In reply to:

Flowchart: What's CRI and TLCI?

CRI is the old and sometimes inaccurate way of measuring colourimetry for lights. Alas it is possible to have high CRI and still not achieve good skin rendition.

There is a new standard, fast being adopted. Developed by Alan Roberts, the TLCI measurements offer a more accurate way of measuring light quality.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2016 at 18:53 UTC

Just because something is expensive doesn't mean it's overpriced. T those that say they are I feel they've never actually shot seriously with a Hass.

These things are beautiful optics, with a smaller market than DSLR. Both of these things have an effect on the price.

If I am more expensive than the next photographer, does that make me necessarily overpriced...? Not if I do it better.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2016 at 07:39 UTC as 15th comment | 17 replies
In reply to:

leecamera: I went to see the exhibition a few days ago. I visit every year (and enter a few times...)

Oh dear... Overall this was a disappointment. If this is the pinacle of portrait photography then we may have to rethink our craft.

There were certainly some images which were stunning - alas these were not the finalists.

I was amazed to find a couple of portraits with studio lighting that was sooo bad. if you like two very obvious nose shadows then fine - but to my eye these were amateur at best.

Some of the images pushed the definition of "portrait" and I feel the inclusion of sets of images reduced the number of photographers who could be seen.

Interestingly nearly every image displayed was by a photographer who had won some previous award. It was almost as if the judges recognised certain names - maybe I'm being cynical.

The finest image was of a male dancer. Effortless in it's presentaion and pose, with beautiful lighting and processing. Should have won by a mile.

Yes that's the one. Absolutely perfect.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2015 at 15:53 UTC

I went to see the exhibition a few days ago. I visit every year (and enter a few times...)

Oh dear... Overall this was a disappointment. If this is the pinacle of portrait photography then we may have to rethink our craft.

There were certainly some images which were stunning - alas these were not the finalists.

I was amazed to find a couple of portraits with studio lighting that was sooo bad. if you like two very obvious nose shadows then fine - but to my eye these were amateur at best.

Some of the images pushed the definition of "portrait" and I feel the inclusion of sets of images reduced the number of photographers who could be seen.

Interestingly nearly every image displayed was by a photographer who had won some previous award. It was almost as if the judges recognised certain names - maybe I'm being cynical.

The finest image was of a male dancer. Effortless in it's presentaion and pose, with beautiful lighting and processing. Should have won by a mile.

Link | Posted on Nov 18, 2015 at 21:48 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies
On article Adobe announces final Camera Raw update for CS6 owners (467 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dan Routh: There are several RAW convertors available. And then there is Affinity Photo. Adobe is beginning it's move to drive away it's customer base.

For now... Give them a chance, it's only recently been released.

Certainly, Affinity is developing fast and is a full featured option. I've had a quick play with the beta version and it was quick and capable. Now they've added stuff raised in the beta test from comments (at last, a company that listens...) they have an excellent competitor and we have a proper choice.

Adobe should stop trying to alienate it's users. Forcing people to upgrade will have half of them finding alternatives. They should be rethinking the CC model now they have competition.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2015 at 07:12 UTC

Put a non-capped lens into a bag and you're just asking for problems - even when it meets a cap at the bottom.

Just think of all that dust that accumulates in the bag and the action of squeezing a lens into the compartment. It will act as a dust pump and could attract particles as you put the lens in / out. Next thing you know, it's on your sensor.

Nice idea, and could work in a very clean bag - but at the end of the day, a little extra time taking care of lens changes makes a big difference to a casual approach.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2015 at 11:07 UTC as 17th comment
On article Opinion: Why the Canon XC10 is a big deal (797 comments in total)

But look at the limitations of that lens... F5.6 at the longer end (and I'll bet 5.6 kicks in way before that). Kisses goodbye any advantages that a larger frame camera may offer.

And of course those saying that video and stills will converge forget that video typically shoots at 1/50 or 1/60 sec for decent motion capture and that isn't much good for anything but a very static stills image. Use the same camera for both applications... maybe one day - but I'll bet my granny the stills cameras will always offer something more to keep the disciplines distinct.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2015 at 18:16 UTC as 244th comment

I'm not seeing a colour balance tool like the PS option. The ability to easily and quickly adjust colours in shadow / mid / highlight areas independently is critical for me. I can use curves, but that is slower and the other colour tools don't offer me the same control.

Or have I missed something obvious?

This above all else would be a deal breaker for me as I'm often shooting in unfavourable light and I use PS to bring colours "home" where LR can't quite make the grade.

Link | Posted on Feb 11, 2015 at 23:42 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply
On article Portrait Salon 'rejects' exhibition opens in London (62 comments in total)

I went yesterday and there were quite a few that I thought should have hit the short list for the Wessing competition.

As with any "judged" display, I questioned some of the choices by the panel, (and one particular photographer seemed unrealistically popular with 3 entries of similar subject material).

Overall a good set though, and worth a tube trip to visit.

Link | Posted on Nov 9, 2014 at 12:16 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

leecamera: I saw the exhibition yesterday and it was full of fabulous images.

The scorpion shot was certainly a winner, but there were several images that far surpassed the winning lion shot. To be honest, when I saw the lion shot (before I knew it was the winner) I remarked that it seemed weak compared to many others.

Worth a visit, but book your tickets in advance as viewing numbers are restricted and in timed sessions. (And only about an hour long so don't hang about on each image...)

Thanks for the clarification. I got the last session in the day so assumed each session was a set length. We were glad to get an entry on the day at all - nearly didn't...

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2014 at 22:08 UTC

I saw the exhibition yesterday and it was full of fabulous images.

The scorpion shot was certainly a winner, but there were several images that far surpassed the winning lion shot. To be honest, when I saw the lion shot (before I knew it was the winner) I remarked that it seemed weak compared to many others.

Worth a visit, but book your tickets in advance as viewing numbers are restricted and in timed sessions. (And only about an hour long so don't hang about on each image...)

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2014 at 08:45 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies
Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »