Bart B Van Bockstaele

Bart B Van Bockstaele

Lives in Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Works as a Medical translator from/into English and Dutch
Joined on Jul 28, 2012

Comments

Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Hands-on with the Sony RX10 III (306 comments in total)
In reply to:

MaxFury: I can't belive they put everything in this camera and didn't include a fully articulating touch screen!
I mean, come on! Everything has a touchscreen these days even my grandmas buttocs has one.
Pretty cool hybrid camera though. Love the three rings on the lens.

**By MaxFury (2 hours ago)
Having a front facing screen for monitoring your shots when you have the camera on a tripod is much more useful.**
If you want yourself in the picture all the time, perhaps. I prefer to take pictures of things I am looking at, not myself, and I prefer the tilting screen by far. There is just something really awkward about the "fully articulating screens", and I hate touch screens anyway.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2016 at 10:20 UTC
On a photo in the Panasonic GH4 samples sample gallery (1 comment in total)

The picture I always wanted to take, and never was able to. Fantastic.

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2015 at 23:54 UTC as 1st comment
On article 2015 Superzoom Camera Roundup (190 comments in total)
In reply to:

grasscatcher: Here's an example of where a telephoto optical zoom can outperform large-sensor crop: I tested Nikon D5300 w/ 70-300mm lens (400mm efl) vs a Canon SX50 at 1200mm efl. Objective was reading 3mm bird bands at 50m distance in daylight. The SX50 produced superior results compared to cropping the D5300's 450mm efl image.

This is also to show that 1200mm can be quite useful at 50m distance, also. ;)

I also tested an FZ1000. It was similar to the Nikon , not as good as the Canon, but overall more useful in the field due to its fast AF for unpredictable wildlife, wide focal range, and reasonable size/weight for its given performance.

The Nikon P900 seems to be unavailable at the moment in Toronto, so I bought the P610 (like the red colour too ^_^). The pictures are unlikely to win any international prizes, but I bought it for the combination of weight, ease of use and reach, and it performs magnificently.

The only negative I have so far is the time it takes to save a 7pic burst (several seconds). If it were not for my low-light requirements, I would probably not use another camera any more.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2015 at 23:03 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (743 comments in total)
In reply to:

justmeMN: In the USA, what mirrorless is missing is many buyers. :-)

It doesn't matter how many people there are to a business, what "matters is how many people can afford their services."
Perhaps. Some of them, however, think it is also important to want or need those services before buying them. Some people think that having the money is not a sufficient reason to buy something.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 22:28 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (743 comments in total)
In reply to:

NoMirror99: Ming's lack of knowledge about Sonys as demonstrated in this article, brings the veracity of the entire piece into question. In spite of that, I agree with some items in his list. And these are not DSLRs, get over it!

"Uses it but doesn't enjoy it? Funny stuff man funny stuff. "
And why is that? There is plenty of stuff I use because I have to and don't enjoy one bit.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 22:24 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (743 comments in total)
In reply to:

abortabort: I live all this 'what mirrorless needs is' which essentially always ends up at 'to be just like DSLRs'.

Yes! Because what the world needs is more of the same... Over and over. Don't like mirrorless? Cool! There are already plenty of options out there, enjoy.

Indeed. One of of the typical SLR things I am certainly not missing is the awful noise they make when taking pictures, more often than not driving away the animals I am trying to take pictures of, which is why I love my Sony A7s. Totally silent shooting (which I actually had to get used to, because it is ridiculously quiet, even in comparison to my Canon SX40 and Nikon P610).

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 16:59 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (743 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ken Takes Photos: Thanks for this, DPR. The thing I see missing is focus on the EVF. Mirrorless simply offers an unquestionable advantage to DSLRs in this area. It's the main piece but it too often is reduced to another point on a list. WYSIWYG is the game changer. Leica's new SL evf is a step up. But once that resolution is double in 18 months, I can't see myself ever buying another DSLR. All the other issues around autofocus will improve and be fixed. But the WYSIWYG is the main event. That's what I'm interested in. And I think, once the tech is there in some months, that will be the only discussion.

I agree. It is seeing the EVF on a Sony A6000 that helped coax me into buying a Sony A7s and its EVF was a major part in my decision to buy the camera.

Also, the ability to actually see what I'm taking pictures of is great. With an optical viewfinder, it was often a shot in the all-too literal dark.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 16:56 UTC
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (743 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: I whole heartedly agree with one observation here in particular...battery life, it's still truly abysmal! At least with my X-E2 it is. While I like my Fujifilm, I have to carry around with me at least 3 batteries to get a decent days worth of shots out of it! That was definitely not the case with my former Canon DSLR, I could shoot for a few days in a row before having to recharge. It's the only thing...performance wise...that I miss from that camera. I also believe that high speed sports photography would of been a lot better with that camera too, but I was never into that, so I don't miss it.

I also turn off my camera between shots. Seems like a no-brainer to me. Of course, electronic viewfinders do consume more power than optical viewfinders. However, they also offer possibilities an optical viewfinder cannot possibly offer. There are trade-offs in both directions, but I have certainly no desire whatsoever to return to the dismal optical viewfinder of my defunct Canon 60D.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 16:48 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1614 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bart B Van Bockstaele: I always wonder with this type of discussion. Why are people buying ‘gear’? Is it to assemble a gear collection, or is to take pictures? I just bought a Sony A7s with a Tamron 18-200 APS-C lens. I didn't buy the Sony because I want to ‘go full-frame’ one day.

I bought the Sony because there are zero alternatives for its low light capabilities, and I bought the Tamron because it was the smallest and lightest and longest and most generally usable zoom lens I could find to fit the Sony. My goal is to make pictures, not even beautiful pictures, but *possible* pictures, not to build an impressive collection of ‘gear’.

The combination, including the strap, weighs 1050 grams, give or take a gram. To me, that's the upper limit of what a cyclist should wear around her/his neck. Once it is worn out, I'll happily dump the thing, and buy what will be most adequate for me then.

I am not a 'photographer'. I take pictures to document what I see. While I am certainly not allergic to 'beautiful pictures' (whatever that means), that is not the reason I take pictures. I'd rather have a terrible picture of a coyote, hence proving it was actually there, than carrying more photographer-oriented equipment, and not having a picture.

Yes, I need that reach. The one negative about this combination it that it is limited to such a short focal distance. I miss the reach of the Canon I used before, but that camera was not able to take pictures in low light as I can now.

To the best of my knowledge, the Tamron is the most versatile lens I could buy. You don't want to have to change lenses when you are looking at a meadow vole or some such thing at 5:30 a.m.

Link | Posted on Oct 7, 2015 at 13:38 UTC
In reply to:

Debankur Mukherjee: Can anyone make a low cost 6MP APS-C sensor with the same low light capability ??

“Just buy original A7s and use it in crop-mode with crop-lenses if you really want only 6MP images.”
That’s precisely what I am doing, and it works beautifully. I do not *want* only 6 MP images, but they are my only realistic option, and they do fine. FF adds only weight and cost for me, nothing else.
“Price for A7s is not so bad any more as the new model came.”
That would depend on the (part of the) planet you live on. Here in Toronto, price of the A7s has gone up, not down. Also, the new model hasn’t come. It is in pre-order. In my book, a model is available, when I can go to a store and pick it up. All the rest is either inconvenient (mail order) or just nonsense (unavailable).

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2015 at 01:02 UTC
In reply to:

RichRMA: I love how Sony and Nikon are "guiding" people to cameras with FF, a 3:2 format invented in 1909 for motion picture film. Talk about going backward.

“Not everyone wants a format trying to ape the 16:9 of a television. I don't even like or need a widescreen monitor, but there is no longer much choice in that regard.”
The voice of reason. I call it the burqa-slit format and am less than eagerly awaiting the 5 metre wide 2 mm high screen. All these wide screens do for me, is waste space on my desk.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2015 at 01:48 UTC
In reply to:

cmvsm: Sony and Panasonic seems to be the only ones innovating these days. My next purchase will most likely be with them. Maybe Nikon will have another boring release of the D3400 or D7300 where the highlight is a slight movement of the controls. Canon and Nikon are becoming the Blackberry of the camera world.

“so much animosity directed towards me because of my assumed electronics purchasing history”
I don't know your purchasing history, nor would it have influenced my comment if I had. My point is simply that "innovation" is a meaningless term for a consumer. That is why we tend to talk about vapourware instead.

The last time “innovation” got me excited, was with the Skiff e-book reader. It would have been the largest e-reader ever produced until that time. Except it was never produced, and even if it had been, it would still have been 2.5 inch smaller than a genuine letter-format page. The bendable properties of its screen were proudly touted everywhere. It died in 2010, before ever being born.

We are still waiting for the first bendable Letter/A4-sized e-reader to reach the market, now half a decade later. That’s “innovation” for you.

Innovation is nonsense. Actually producing and selling something new that is better than what we had before is what we need.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2015 at 01:42 UTC
In reply to:

photomedium: I actually appreciate very much Sony a7 series vs, for example, the Oly
EM 1 EM 5 EM10 or the fuji XT1 XT10 and all the other docked down model series intended to fill up catalogs and rake in the DPR silver awards. Really an old business model that has no place in the current market IMO.
I think Sony should be the model for all other camera makers to follow: put the best know-how in each camera toward a specific goal and let people pick what they need.

There I was, hoping for a juicy beheading by a knife-free executioner, to be photographed by camera-free photographers whose photos would be published in Rhonda Byrnes’ “If You Really Wish It, It Will Already Have Happened”.

Life stinks sometimes [weeping uncontrollably]

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2015 at 21:14 UTC
In reply to:

cmvsm: Sony and Panasonic seems to be the only ones innovating these days. My next purchase will most likely be with them. Maybe Nikon will have another boring release of the D3400 or D7300 where the highlight is a slight movement of the controls. Canon and Nikon are becoming the Blackberry of the camera world.

“I don't. Neither do I break into R&D labs and steal it. Truth be told, I don't have any future products or vaporware. None of that diminishes the fact that cool-sht is happening all around you.”
Perhaps. But if it doesn't make it to market, it is unusable for me, and therefore something I should not use to base any decisions on. For all I care, Canon may well have a 4 trillion ISO sensor sitting in some lab, but for me, the Sony A7s is as good as it gets, and (as far as I can tell) this new iteration is so incremental that I find it difficult to even be excited enough to have a look at it, if and when it becomes finally available.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2015 at 20:07 UTC
In reply to:

cmvsm: Sony and Panasonic seems to be the only ones innovating these days. My next purchase will most likely be with them. Maybe Nikon will have another boring release of the D3400 or D7300 where the highlight is a slight movement of the controls. Canon and Nikon are becoming the Blackberry of the camera world.

“Not the point. It's innovation.”
Innovation is only useful if it makes it to market. As a case in point: we have been promised flexible/bendable/foldable LCD screens for decades, and what do we get after all this waiting? Some TVs with a slight curve, and for some reason we should now all faint in breathless admiration.

I bought the Sony A7s, because I don't care what vapourware the others announce. I needed a new camera, and the A7s - while far from perfect - fit my needs better than any other camera currently on the market. So I bought it, even if the price was rather steep.

I buy what is available, not what is not. It is that simple. I suspect you don't buy the unavailable stuff either.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 20:21 UTC
In reply to:

Bezbozny: Sony Europe gives a November 2015 availability at €3,400. The a7S II will be available in the US from October for $2,999.

Are the kidding???? Since when 2,999$ = 3,400 euros?????

I had such as thoughts as well when I was still an ignorant European. When I came to Toronto, I started to learn that things weren't always what they seemed and that the seemingly lower North American prices often turned out to be more expensive than the seemingly higher European prices.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 20:02 UTC
In reply to:

photomedium: I actually appreciate very much Sony a7 series vs, for example, the Oly
EM 1 EM 5 EM10 or the fuji XT1 XT10 and all the other docked down model series intended to fill up catalogs and rake in the DPR silver awards. Really an old business model that has no place in the current market IMO.
I think Sony should be the model for all other camera makers to follow: put the best know-how in each camera toward a specific goal and let people pick what they need.

I really went overboard on this one, didn't I stevo23? I am preparing for my execution right now.
If only I had known these things before I bought the A7s. It would have saved me a bundle ^_^

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 19:54 UTC
In reply to:

photomedium: I actually appreciate very much Sony a7 series vs, for example, the Oly
EM 1 EM 5 EM10 or the fuji XT1 XT10 and all the other docked down model series intended to fill up catalogs and rake in the DPR silver awards. Really an old business model that has no place in the current market IMO.
I think Sony should be the model for all other camera makers to follow: put the best know-how in each camera toward a specific goal and let people pick what they need.

“Stupid me, I thought the photographer made the photos.”
I'm sure this revelation will shock you, but the photographer needs a camera to make the photos, and if the camera cannot do something, the photographer can't either.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 00:24 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1614 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Barker: I think this discussion shows two things:

1. People never talk about the viewfinder. Larger formats come with better optical viewfinders. If you care about that sort of thing...

2. There's probably pent-up interest for shootouts between equivalent systems of different formats in the same price range. EOS 7D Mark II with 18-135mm STM Kit vs EOS 6D with 24-105mm f/4L Kit, for example?

‘People never talk about the viewfinder.’

I noticed that too. When I bought the Canon 60D, I didn't think much of it. That was a mistake. I still remember how I then acquired the hoodman with its awkward "crane" in an attempt to correct that oversight. That was a mistake too. The optics were so bad, it hardly reached the level of a toy.

When I bought the Sony A7s a few weeks ago, the viewfinder played a major part in my decision to go for it.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2015 at 01:48 UTC
On article Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path (1614 comments in total)
In reply to:

pcworth: Hmmm, I'm not sure I understand what is wrong with thinking about the future of your equipment. If you are thinking about moving to full frame, and a full frame lens is available that covers your current crop frame needs, I would argue it makes more financial sense to purchase that. I would also argue that if there is no problem with a 24-70 f/2.8 because you can always buy a 10-24 zoom to cover that lower end, if you have a desire for such wide angles.

I purchased a Canon EF 70-200 IS f/2.8 for use on my T4i because I needed the f/2.8 and the zoom range for indoor sport photography.

I did not realize that Nikon full frame cameras can use crop frame lenses! Very cool! Why doesn't Canon allow that?

‘in good light the differences are negligeable’
A common claim. It may be correct. However, not everything happens in ‘good light’. Just try to find bats (the flying mammals, not the sticks used to smash people’s skulls) in good light, for example. Some of us have to accept reality, and that means bad light.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2015 at 01:13 UTC
Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
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