Richard Schumer

Joined on May 30, 2012

Comments

Total: 261, showing: 1 – 20
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I actually had a Carl Zeiss Jena Biotar 58mm f:2.0 lens I bought new circa 1958 mounted on a Pentacon body. The camera was an eye-opener (the first permanent pentaprism SLR) but the lens sucked so bad with low contrast, fuzzy images and a stiff focusing helicoid that I used an Aries fixed-lens rangefinder equipped with a 50mm f:2.0 Nikkor lens instead and relegated the Pentacon to telephoto optics..

That someone is going to spend two kilobucks on a resurrected version strikes me as absurd as southern-states' farmers voting for a Damn Yankee...oh wait, they did. Viva 21st century!

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 21:07 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

Richard Schumer: Is a kickstarter-like funding drive in Roubles involved? Cause when I enhanced the photo above in GiMP, it appears the lens is a 35mm (visible on the rim) of obviously retrofocus design; the camera body has a distinct mirror-box bulge which a mirrorless camera doesn't need (with the exception of the Pentax K01) and do I see a rapid film wind lever stuck behind the shutter release?

To paraphrase Shakespeare, "Something is rotten in the State of Russia" as they didn't even make a wood or plastic mockup, using, instead a modified picture of an old film Zenit.

My $0.02.

@Cameracist What? Is DPR part of the anti-Russia/Trump Fake News conspiracy?

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 23:16 UTC

Is a kickstarter-like funding drive in Roubles involved? Cause when I enhanced the photo above in GiMP, it appears the lens is a 35mm (visible on the rim) of obviously retrofocus design; the camera body has a distinct mirror-box bulge which a mirrorless camera doesn't need (with the exception of the Pentax K01) and do I see a rapid film wind lever stuck behind the shutter release?

To paraphrase Shakespeare, "Something is rotten in the State of Russia" as they didn't even make a wood or plastic mockup, using, instead a modified picture of an old film Zenit.

My $0.02.

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 23:03 UTC as 89th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Richard Schumer: The first rule of compsition I learned was that if a picture of a person hasn't enough "headroom," it makes the person seem too tall. I was about ten years old. Some years later, shooting sports, I "discovered" diagonal lines gave a picture a sense of movement or dynamism.

As I matured, I learned psychology (the biological kind) and that opened the door to the "rule of thirds," or the Golden Ratio, in which the eye and brain explore spaces in particular ways or patterns. In this way I learned to control where the viewer would look into the frame -- simply place the object or detail I wanted to illustrate at a point the eye would naturally want to go to.

Continued...

Part Two:

The missing element in all this is being able to see one's image as others would see it. The photographer knows and remembers his relationship with the subject; the viewer has no such notions. This entails gaining self-knowledge and an objective viewpoint (as opposed to an egoistic one) which is akin to seeing oneself as others see us.

The article's point, as I see it, is for us to understand and manage what the viewer sees first and what he ignores by understanding ourselves and our relationship with others. This has always been the goal of artists, I think.

I have been practicing photographer for more than sixty years now, and I am still improving. But perhaps that's just because I am a slow learner -- at least compared to Henri.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 02:09 UTC

(Posted in Error)

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 02:06 UTC as 64th comment

The first rule of compsition I learned was that if a picture of a person hasn't enough "headroom," it makes the person seem too tall. I was about ten years old. Some years later, shooting sports, I "discovered" diagonal lines gave a picture a sense of movement or dynamism.

As I matured, I learned psychology (the biological kind) and that opened the door to the "rule of thirds," or the Golden Ratio, in which the eye and brain explore spaces in particular ways or patterns. In this way I learned to control where the viewer would look into the frame -- simply place the object or detail I wanted to illustrate at a point the eye would naturally want to go to.

Continued...

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2017 at 02:05 UTC as 65th comment | 5 replies

Those elements are now even more aspherical than before. ;o}

Too bad, though.

Say, does anyone know the refractive index of Super Glue?

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 05:14 UTC as 123rd comment

Bah! This "news" is by and for the legal departments; expect big patent battles or cross-brand patent exchanges in future. Curved sensors are great in theory.

The problem is that, in theory, theory and practice should be the same. In practice, they are not.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2017 at 22:05 UTC as 44th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

tonyC1994: Richard, thanks for the review! In next DPR interview with Canon executives, can your coworker ask what's the logic behind this DR issue?

It's likely Canon's sensor design and fab teams aren't up to the technological challenges presented by Sony's teams; I doubt Canon is so cynical as to try to cheat past and prospective customers.

A parallel would be AMD computer chip design and fab: AMD led Intel in performance until their leader left for Apple, for which he designed great chips, and retook the lead after he returned a year or two ago. BTW, he's gone again, recruited by Tesla.

Canon, IMO, should steal away some Sony hotshot. Otherwise, they're probably SOL.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2017 at 03:44 UTC
In reply to:

Majauskasson: Wise words from Charlie Howse. I know many people who own expensive cameras and their pictures are junk. They can't operate a good camera any more than they can a drive Formula 1. But most people can drive a Chevy. For most people a simple smart phone or basic point and shoot are good enough. Their pictures will still be mediocre and not memorable but at least they'll be viewable.

Well, I think you're over your head with the comment about Formula-1. I have driven a Ralt Formula 1 chassis from circa 1975 (with a hot rotary motor) and it is quite as easy to drive as any Honda or Chevy. Its steering is light and accurate, its brake pedal is easy to push, its clutch is gradual and soft; the sense of speed disappears as the car is only a few cm off the pavement and, finally, the G-forces are barely felt, what with the grippy seat, 5-point harness and little room to be tossed about in the cabin. The only giveaway is the rapid narrowing of one's field of vision as speed increases dramatically. It is quite easy to become competent in one.

One does not operate a Cambo 4x5 without lots of technical expertise, however.

Your main point is quite right, though: it's just as hard to be fast in a F1 car as it is to make great photos with any camera.

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2017 at 22:26 UTC
In reply to:

FuhTeng: Is this the first time Sony's ever made a world-class lens for LESS than CaNikon rivals?

It probably is -- the main benefit of the short flange distance on the mirrorless body is in wide and extra-wide lenses. That short back distance makes for smaller, simpler designs than more retrofocus-based optics of dSLRs.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2017 at 02:03 UTC
In reply to:

Alphaville: What happens if I drop it?

You will almost certainly say two words, one of which is "Oh!"

Link | Posted on May 26, 2017 at 20:16 UTC

"There are only 95 of the ‘Edition 0.95’ lenses worldwide, which have unpainted engravings...."

One wouldn't want to lead the eye away from the fine finish with gaudy, attention-grabbing operating control parameters!

Link | Posted on May 26, 2017 at 20:13 UTC as 9th comment | 1 reply
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (348 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jonathan Mac: Pentax made a manual focus 75mm f/2.8 leaf shutter version of their standard 75/2.8 lens for the film 645, I believe that would allow flash sync up to 1/500s. I think though that it lacked the "A" setting to allow the camera to control the aperture setting, so exposure mode would be manual only.

You're correct about the leaf-shutter 75mm; I just checked mine and there is no A-position on the aperture ring, probably because the lens was designed to be used with a flash meter or other manually-metered method. There is a version w/o the leaf shutter which has the A-position.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2017 at 02:20 UTC
On article Juggling with one hand: Leica M10 shooting experience (487 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ronan_M: Well I guess you're paying for the experience of using a Leica. If that rocks your boat and you've got the cash, why not? It does look lovely if you like the retro look.
However, I will laugh hard at any hint of rationalising the use of this camera as an image-making device.
Why would anyone part with that much cash for something that performs significantly worse than a 700$ entry-level kit is beyond me. That "Leica" name has to really really give you hardons to justify this.

@dlb4 : When I was a kid, I used RF cameras until prismatic SLRs were introduced and I felt the same way, perhaps because a successful image was quite a surprise, given the approximation of the picture the viewfinder gave. It seemed a miracle.

SLRs with pentaprisms showed exactly what the film would capture, and the element of expectation was gone.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 05:45 UTC

I owned an Asahiflex I, which I bought used in 1957, when I was 14 years old. The slow f:3.5 lens wasn't fast enough (this in the days before Tri-X) for available-light shooting, so I traded it for a Pentacon with F:2 Biotar, and found the eye-level prism finder much better than either the waist-level reflex finder or the eye-level optical finder without focus aid of the A'flex. When I visited Japan in 1966, I bought a black Spotmatic with its f:1.4, 8-element "radioactive" lens (wonderful!) and used it until the K-mount was introduced, at which time I traded it for an ME. That kit was stolen, so I tried a Nikon F, but it didn't feel as well-made as Pentaxes nor did it fit my hands as well. After a few years, I traded it for another ME, which I used until the *ist DS was introduced; that was replaced by a K10D, which I still use. About the same time, I acquired a 645 with four lenses for film use.

I guess that makes me a long-time Pentaxian!

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2017 at 23:37 UTC as 33rd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

TonyPM: Is it 35mm?

@CopCaarSS -- It isn't only Rodinal which has a long shelf life: Leicanol (a "compensating" developer marketed by Leica in the sixties) came in glass vials which contained no air, only developer concentrate. The thought was without oxygen there could be no oxidation and shelf life would be improved, I guess. It was a one-shot system, so a vial's contents were used only once and then discarded.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 16:47 UTC
In reply to:

TonyPM: Is it 35mm?

@Samuel wrote: "Rodinal never dies." That may be true -- the information sheet that comes with it says "slight flocculations are of no consequence," and the glass bottle it comes in has a tight rubber stopper. I hope you're right, but Foma makes a clone, and a recipe for it using Tylenol acetominophen and lye is available online.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 03:18 UTC
In reply to:

TonyPM: Is it 35mm?

120! I would try some on my Pentax 645 as soon as it's available! I was never a fan of Ferrania before, but....

I have to check whether my horde of Agfa Rodinal is still any good.

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2017 at 21:36 UTC
On article Hopes of Kodachrome relaunch put on ice (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

Turbguy1: Bring back Tech Pan, or even better, High Contrast Copy Film. High Contrast Copy Film, when processed for full range, could EASY achieve 250 lp/mm, and challenge the BEST technique and lenses. At ISO of about 2...

IIRC Technical Pan had a useful ISO of 20 when processed in Agfa Rodinal diluted to 150:1 and inverted every 30 seconds for ten minutes at 20C. Full tonal range, no visible grain, and resolution beyond any of my lenses. Adox, I believe, still sells a similar film and Foma makes a Rodinal clone, for those who are interested.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2017 at 17:40 UTC
Total: 261, showing: 1 – 20
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