Timmbits

Timmbits

Lives in Canada Montreal, Canada
Works as a inventor
Joined on Oct 8, 2011
About me:

Deutscher, living in Montreal Canada.
Cycling, chess, design, inventions, nature, photography, are some of the things I like.

Comments

Total: 1639, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Tristan Jones: Strange that "Windows photos" is more fluid "for me" than Lightroom for image review/browsing.

I get about 1/2 a sec browse lag on an image browser that comes free with my OS, which reads my D800|D610|D750 Raw files as well as my 3.9GB TIFF files.

Yet my paid-for "specialist" program judders through image previews in a way that would have you believe I'm working on a 20-year PC, not one of the best "single-core-performance" quad-core cpu's ever made (i7-4790k). So even taking single/multithreaded performance into account, this should not happen for me. And doesn't with other applications, just in Lightroom!

The simple fact is, the whole LR interface needs re-coding.
And that is before we take "using 4k screens" into consideration.
On a 4k screen, it judders, just opening or closing a tab in the develop module.
And once working on images, it slows down over time, even when you return to Library.

maybe we ought to revisit the roster of free software that is out there

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 03:56 UTC

That's what you get, when you use high-level languages to speed up development and save on competent programmers: bloatware.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 03:54 UTC as 2nd comment

To be quite frank, I don't want to drain my phone's battery on camera gear.
When I want something modular, I use something called a c.a.m.e.r.a.
Why would I want to hang a bunch of stuff on my phone anyways?
What do I do when I get a call? Tear it all off?
(if the battery isn't drained by then, that is)

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 03:43 UTC as 1st comment

Curved sensors? Big deal! That is the easy part.

But who is willing to redesign all their lenses and put in the marketing dollars to convince everyone to reequip themselves?

That, is is no small matter.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 03:14 UTC as 1st comment

This should be entertaining... more vaporware! lol

(more nice new cameras they won't release)

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 03:10 UTC as 18th comment
In reply to:

RingoMan: Regardless of shutter differences it seems to me that flash photography is still severely punished. I hope that a mirrorless camera in APS-C can help by building an auxiliary leaf shutter in the camera body right behind the lens. The APS-C size would certainly allow for this. This would be like the leaf shutter lenses that were available for focal plane cameras. There is a reason the new Hasselblad still uses leaf shutters!

and these two:

http://www.philcameras.be/collection/images/pubs_annees/pub1957/Konica-III-our-best-pub-1957-Us-850.jpg

http://www.philcameras.be/collection/images/pubs_annees/pub1956/Konica-III-pub--read-what-experts-1956-Us-850.jpg

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 17:53 UTC
In reply to:

Timmbits: In my camera, I can choose between no electronic curtain,
electronic first curtain, or
electronic second curtain.

The argument can me made that when you press the shutter, you create a little movement anyways. therefore removing the advantage of an electronic first curtain to keep the camera stable.

Would this be the reason for having the electronic second curtain option? Or would it be something else? (for example, keeping the camera stable once the curtain is open, and closing behind and following as data is read out)

(in case it makes any difference, it's a Samsung NX20)

I can't find it anymore either... not sure if it was in a previous firmware, or if it was in only one of the modes that I saw that. All I know, is it was cause for confusion for me.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 17:17 UTC
In reply to:

BobT3218: Straight lines, flat surfaces and right-angles are easy. Consistently accurate curves are something else entirely. That's why we pay so much for our lenses. The manufacture of circular lenses I more or less understand but it's mind boggling to me how they make asymmetric lenses. Hey, DPR, how about an article on the manufacture of asymmetric lenses?

That is way over even their heads.
In a case like this, google is your friend.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 17:16 UTC

In my camera, I can choose between no electronic curtain,
electronic first curtain, or
electronic second curtain.

The argument can me made that when you press the shutter, you create a little movement anyways. therefore removing the advantage of an electronic first curtain to keep the camera stable.

Would this be the reason for having the electronic second curtain option? Or would it be something else? (for example, keeping the camera stable once the curtain is open, and closing behind and following as data is read out)

(in case it makes any difference, it's a Samsung NX20)

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 08:09 UTC as 6th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

tmy: Very informative and well written article, especially on a fairly complicated subject.

I was thinking though, should we not use the term "physical" shutter rather than "mechanical" shutter? In pre-digital days, mechanical shutters were ones that didn't need batteries to operate, like that of the FM2, OM-1, OM-3, MX etc as opposed to electronically controlled shutters such as those on the F3, AE-1, OM-4 etc which did need a battery.

bit of pedantry I guess, but it all gets a bit muddled....

BTW for me the silent shutter the most useful feature for me in the A7 series, which I've used professionally now for this feature alone for the last 2 years. I have the A7s and the A7RII with Sony, Leica M and Contax G lenses, but otherwise I use Nikon DSLRs.

The only part you can't touch, that isn't physical, is software.
Whether spring-operated or battery-operated, the piece is still a mechanical shutter. With or without static electrical help.
It's moot.
Electronic shutter refers to the absence of, or non-use of, the physical/mechanical piece, by electronics that are also physically present.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 08:02 UTC
In reply to:

AARonron: Great article. I would like to see a follow-up that summarized when each style of shutter is most beneficial and examples of applications each excels at.
For example, I've read more than one photog gush over how great silent shooting is for their portrait work, keeping subjects more at ease and candid.
Conversely, from the article it sounds like e-shutters might be terrible for sports, but is it really? How fast do things need to be moving to cause noticeable distortion? (not rhetorical, I really would like to know)
E-shutters seem like they'd be great for shooting with a fast lens on a sunny day without having to stop down or use an ND filter to avoid blow-out. But, is it that simple?

I think we too often forget that today's camera is a computer. And we all know how computers vary immensely in speed from one to another, especially a generation to another. And camera models don't always upgrade the processor or processing speed, the bus, etc. And they just don't talk about that because it would create more confusion than answers for most.
So when you describe problems of electronic shutter, you need to keep in mind that what is a challenge for one processor(camera), is easy for another.
BTW, it's not true that "reduced distance" in small sensors is responsible for faster readout. Electrons move at the speed of light - a few millimeters more or less isn't going to change a thing. It's sensor speed, processing speed, the speed of the RAM, and the bus that links them. If some smartphones read the info out faster, it's simply because they're designed with faster electronics - required by Android and managing massive amounts of apps & data - not MP in less space.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 07:49 UTC
On article Polaroid sold to new owner (94 comments in total)

PL RIP Holdings...
not a lucky name.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 06:47 UTC as 2nd comment

...how about free?
I've been using a recycled Samsung NX20 with the 30mm f2 pancake lens.
The overall package is more compact than an X100 and has a larger sensor than MFT, and the lens isn't all that bad either.
IMO the X100 was always overpriced for what it offered, and I never understood the blind following it had.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 06:36 UTC as 5th comment
On article Google will no longer develop Nik Collection (392 comments in total)

Google terminating another app?
noooo, really?
what else is new?
This is why I don't use google for much... 90% of their products don't make it beyond a year or two. You get all invested in them, with your time and data and methodology of doing things, and they pull the plug. That's google!

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 06:13 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply

What use is 4k video, or all those pixels in images, when the image quality sucks?

I wish these guys would come out with better IQ in the underwater category.

No wonder the industry is in shambles. They've been at a stand-still for a decade now.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 06:11 UTC as 2nd comment
On article 2017 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras (507 comments in total)
In reply to:

Timmbits: I guess this comparison would be pointless, if you had included the new Nikon models in the evals.

just disappointed that year after year they leave out some interesting models.
in this case, we now know the reason.
but in past years, perfectly available cameras had been left out.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 06:05 UTC
In reply to:

Preternatural Stuff: Great - but only for fixed-focal length-fixed-sensor cameras like those in phones/telescopes etc. No zoom lens or interchangeable lens.

Unless ...What would be interesting would be a shape memory alloy back plate for the sensor which flexes/curves to varying degrees with the application of an appropriate electrical current. The engineering precision would be quite incredible.Maybe calibrated curvatures for common focal lengths in steps like 24mm, 35mm, 50mm?

you're being a bit myopic:
just as they correct for a flat surface,
it can also correct for a concave surface.
only, it will require less adjustments.
zoom or no zoom.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 06:03 UTC

it is 2017...
and they are only figuring this out now?

the slow pace at which we move is shameful

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 05:58 UTC as 2nd comment | 2 replies
On article 2017 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras (507 comments in total)

Whatever happened to those cameras Nikon had announced?
There was a built-in 20-50mm f2 lens model, I believe, a longer version and a wider version.
I was impatiently awaiting their release, then nothing.
Saw them on amazon and b+h, but they never shipped.
...now, we're stuck looking at old models comprising half of this roundup.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 05:04 UTC as 19th comment
On article Fast Five: Sony Cyber-shot RX100 V Review (432 comments in total)
In reply to:

Timmbits: I've stopped being disappointed at this having no handle/grip.
I just go to the dollar store, buy some rubber anti-skid pads you put under couches, and cut it to size. you can stack them to get the thickness you want. problem solved.
it's just ironic that you have to go to such ends on a $1k camera.

That Sony grip is actually a very bad design.
Maximum leverage is obtained the higher up you are on the object, and it stops halfway up. Pulling on the bottom only makes it tilt in the direction you don't want it to fall.
Many of those grips seem to be more about styling than function.

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 04:09 UTC
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