tomjar

Lives in Slovenia Ljubljana, Slovenia
Joined on Aug 5, 2004

Comments

Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony announces Cyber-shot RX100 VI with 24-200mm zoom (742 comments in total)
In reply to:

Grumpyrocker: Impressive specs, but the price for a compact is mad.

I also wonder about the quality of the lens. The one on the Panasonic TZ100 is awful. I wonder how much of a compromise this Sony lens will be.

Agreed! How much can the initial price be expected to drop? Not by much I guess, with nearly no competition in this segment.

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2018 at 14:45 UTC
On article Review: Peak Design Capture Clip V3 (242 comments in total)
In reply to:

JRM PT: I like a lot most of Peak design products but this one I can't get it. Unless one have a small camera attached I don't think it's practical to walk around with it clipped on the shoulder or chest. I can't imagine doing that with my D5300 even with the small 35mm lens attached. And it's not a very big camera. It will be bulky and unbalanced enough to be uncomfortable.

@JRM PT:
That's because you have never tried it, seriously! I've got the V3 since half a year ago. I regret not getting the previous version years ago. And I am getting another one before the next trip so that I don't have to move it between my two rucksacks, it is so convenient. I cannot vouch for heavier gear, but my Panasonic G80 (about the same size/weight as your D5300) sits comfortably on my left shoulder strap of any backpack, even the lighter ones.

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2018 at 05:17 UTC
On article DPReview TV: Waterproof camera shootout 2018 (177 comments in total)
In reply to:

dmanthree: Add me to those that really prefer written reviews.

Agreed as well.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2018 at 05:12 UTC
In reply to:

tomjar: While I have no doubts about the compact camera segment shrinking, I have to wonder how much this downward trend is contributed to by the lack of new compact camera models. The release rate of new advanced compact cameras by all manufacturers combined is down to zero (almost). The chicken-egg dilemma...

@badi: "Exactly, i can count at least a dozen examples from my close friends and family who used to have compacts (the casual user type, who bought 1 mid-price compact camera every 3-4 years) that now rely only on their smart-phone. And no they have absolutely zero interest into moving to something "more advanced"

Yeah, I know plenty of folks like that too. And they tend to buy a new phone every 1-2 years for the price twice as high as their compact cameras used to cost...

I totally understand the free-fall decline of low-end (even mid-level) compacts for casual users, but what about the advanced high-end compacts for advanced users? Phones are absolutely no match for such cameras in terms of functionality, versatility, capabilities - except the IQ maybe. But still, these compacts are gone too (almost).

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2018 at 07:19 UTC
In reply to:

tomjar: While I have no doubts about the compact camera segment shrinking, I have to wonder how much this downward trend is contributed to by the lack of new compact camera models. The release rate of new advanced compact cameras by all manufacturers combined is down to zero (almost). The chicken-egg dilemma...

@LDunn1: My bad; dino or egg dilemma then :D

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2018 at 06:58 UTC
In reply to:

tomjar: While I have no doubts about the compact camera segment shrinking, I have to wonder how much this downward trend is contributed to by the lack of new compact camera models. The release rate of new advanced compact cameras by all manufacturers combined is down to zero (almost). The chicken-egg dilemma...

@Magnar W: You are putting all compact cameras (and their users) in the same basket. I agree with you for the lower end compact cameras and I realize that these used to constitute the vast majority (quantity-wise) of the compact segment. But the advanced (higher-end) cameras to which I explicitly referred are almost extinct as well and phone cameras of today are and will probably always be far away from offering the same level of capabilities, versatility and functionality. For that very reason I am still sticking to my Nikon P7700 as my compact goes-everywhere-with-me camera (and hoping it doesn't die on me anytime soon) because there is simply nothing on the market to replace it with. That said, I also use the camera on my Xperia Z5 phone, but it is light years away from being a replacement for the 4 years older Nikon. Oh, and I have absolutely no use for the capability to post to social media...

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2018 at 06:54 UTC

While I have no doubts about the compact camera segment shrinking, I have to wonder how much this downward trend is contributed to by the lack of new compact camera models. The release rate of new advanced compact cameras by all manufacturers combined is down to zero (almost). The chicken-egg dilemma...

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 05:55 UTC as 52nd comment | 8 replies
In reply to:

miksto: Well, the test totally misses the main point and advantage of Eneloop Pros which is low idle discharge. Otherwise outside of this it is just a battery. This to me just shows the guy who did the testing demonstrated total misunderstanding of what such batteries are for and tested something unrelated to Eneloop Pro advantage.

You do not need Eneloop Pros for flashes. You need it for where you know your batteries need to last long - like in clocks or remote controls or anywhere else where fast idle discharge means charging more often and you cannot be bothered (still better buy cheap non-rechargables). Or if you need spares and do not want to check and charge them up too often and still want to be confident they did not self-discharge too much if you did not use them for months because they were lying in your bag all this time as spares just in case.

@miksto: I am not disagreeing with you, I just oppose your view that the test is meaningless. Yes, you have to use your brain. If certain set of batteries costs only 1/3 of what a differently branded set of batteries costs (at the same or even better performance - recycle time in this case), then the brain suggests to use the cheaper alternative, does it not? Provided of course that there is not some other significant disadvantage associated with using the cheaper variant, like much poorer charge retention (and we don't know anything about how well the LADDAs perform in this regard).
The major flaw with the test is that only a single set of each batteries was used.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 16:01 UTC
In reply to:

dougjgreen1: It would be nice if the article actually mentioned the specific attribute of Eneloop batteries that makes them desirable: They are extremely low discharge. Meaning that they hold their charge for years, not days, the way cheaper batteries do. If you don't use a cheap recyclable NiMH battery for months or years, they not only won't be charged when you need them, they may have discharged so much that they can't be fully charged anymore. Not so with Eneloops. This comparison here is what is known as an extremely incomplete test gamed to the strength of one product being tested without testing the attributes that the other product was optimized to perform on, an without explaining why that attribute matters.

I really don't see a problem here. All tests are always incomplete.
The guy was testing the performance of the Eneloops against the Laddas for two parameters only: recycle time and price. Clear advantage of the Laddas in these two parameters does not negate the hypothetical (since this was not tested...) but of course likely advantage of the Eneloops in charge retention. But even if the Laddas did not perform as good as the Eneloops in charge retention (and we don't actually know if this would be the case!), the price performance and faster recycling could still be more important than charge retention for some users.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 09:27 UTC
In reply to:

miksto: Well, the test totally misses the main point and advantage of Eneloop Pros which is low idle discharge. Otherwise outside of this it is just a battery. This to me just shows the guy who did the testing demonstrated total misunderstanding of what such batteries are for and tested something unrelated to Eneloop Pro advantage.

You do not need Eneloop Pros for flashes. You need it for where you know your batteries need to last long - like in clocks or remote controls or anywhere else where fast idle discharge means charging more often and you cannot be bothered (still better buy cheap non-rechargables). Or if you need spares and do not want to check and charge them up too often and still want to be confident they did not self-discharge too much if you did not use them for months because they were lying in your bag all this time as spares just in case.

Well, all photo stores I have been to are pushing Eneloops big time. Therefore it is safe to assume that Eneloop AA batteries end up being used in many flashes (including mine). Then this information becomes relevant. But of course it is good to know that you can rely of fully charged Eneloops to retain most of their charge after a couple of months of idle time.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 09:04 UTC
In reply to:

vesa1tahti: Drones ought to be illegal. Too dangerous toys. Only for professional use and users.

Lee Jay: What do you use them for then? Did you make them yourself?

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2018 at 06:10 UTC
On article Buying Guide: The best cameras for video (142 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nukunukoo: where thou Lumix G80/G85?

Not to mention the fully articulated LCD that G80/G85 has and GX80/GX85 lacks...
It seems that the G80/G85 is not liked all that much among DPR staff except by Dan Bracaglia who reviewed the camera. This camera doesn't get recommended in any buying guide (not even in the "below $1000" one). Excellent review results (better than direct competition) and its popularity in the Micro four thirds forum obviously don't play a role in these recommendations.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2017 at 09:52 UTC
On article Buying Guide: The best cameras under $1000 (177 comments in total)

Just curious: are these recommendations (in each category) based on the opinion of a single DPR staff member or are they based on a consensus? And if the later, do the results of the reviews of individual cameras play any role in these recommendations? Obviously I am biased since I own a Panasonic G80, but if I stayed with Nikon the D5600 would most probably be my latest camera. According to the reviews G80 came out substantially ahead of D5600 and Olympus OM-D M10 III so it is kind of strange to see the Nikon and the Olympus as the "winners" in this recommendation (I am sure they are both fine cameras, no doubt).

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2017 at 14:59 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1633 comments in total)
In reply to:

Naveed Akhtar: I adopted lightroom from its earlier versions and then every new version they were releasing I was upgrading it; for all those new features. so if you are like me .. subscription model simply makes more sense; and you are also getting photoshop

True, but if you don't upgrade to every new version and if you also don't use/need Photoshop (and mobile applications), then it doesn't make sense at all. Previously we had a choice (perpetual vs subscription), now we don't any more.
Well, we do, drop Lightroom and Adobe and find something else to replace it.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 11:12 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1633 comments in total)
In reply to:

afm: There is plenty of other software out there which provides similar tools both free or inexpensive and sometimes better. For some reason it is believed that Adobe has a monopoly. It has'nt. Move on to something else.

absquatulate:
Thanks, I will check it out. Luckily I have no immediate need to change anything, I bought LR 6 perpetual in August and it covers my newest camera, so I am good for the time being.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 08:54 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1633 comments in total)
In reply to:

tomjar: I fully agree with you Richard.
I used to upgrade my software every 4-5 years. I started with PS Elements 4, followed by PS Elements/Premiere 6, Lightroom 4 (in 2012) and finally Lightroom 6 this year. I have exactly zero need for "real" Photoshop or mobile applications and have never had a need for constant upgrading. I liked Lightroom and for my use and purpose I am happy to pay 150 EUR for a new version every couple of years or so. But asking 150 EUR per year from me for the same use as before is a rip-off. Adobe obviously doesn't care for users like me anymore. So be it.
Is there any serious alternative, a combination of DAM and image processing software?

Thanks Marucha, I will.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 08:34 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1633 comments in total)
In reply to:

afm: There is plenty of other software out there which provides similar tools both free or inexpensive and sometimes better. For some reason it is believed that Adobe has a monopoly. It has'nt. Move on to something else.

Which software combines DAM and image processing functionality comparable to Lightroom?

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 08:08 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1633 comments in total)

I fully agree with you Richard.
I used to upgrade my software every 4-5 years. I started with PS Elements 4, followed by PS Elements/Premiere 6, Lightroom 4 (in 2012) and finally Lightroom 6 this year. I have exactly zero need for "real" Photoshop or mobile applications and have never had a need for constant upgrading. I liked Lightroom and for my use and purpose I am happy to pay 150 EUR for a new version every couple of years or so. But asking 150 EUR per year from me for the same use as before is a rip-off. Adobe obviously doesn't care for users like me anymore. So be it.
Is there any serious alternative, a combination of DAM and image processing software?

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 07:49 UTC as 384th comment | 4 replies
On article Nikon reshuffles management structure (244 comments in total)
In reply to:

tomjar: I know zero about corporate management and I know Nikon is involved in different areas of industry. I can only comment as a consumer of let's say cheaper "prosumer" cameras. I have been on a lookout for new cameras to replace my two Nikons, D5000 and P7700 (an exchangeable lens camera and one highly capable and versatile compact camera), since more than a year now. I don't have money to throw around and for trying out this and that. I would love to stay with Nikon since I don't like changing platforms if not necessary, but I don't think I will be buying another Nikon anytime soon. It will be a Panasonic mirrorless camera and a Canon compact instead, most likely and soon.

To me Nikon's decisions in the "prosumer" segment (except for the DSLRs) over the last years look like those of a headless chicken. South Park episode Margaritaville comes to mind...

I know, but I am looking for something smaller now. If I wanted to stay with a DSLR I would pick a D7500. The m43 format looks very appealing to me right now...

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 11:12 UTC
On article Nikon reshuffles management structure (244 comments in total)
In reply to:

tomjar: I know zero about corporate management and I know Nikon is involved in different areas of industry. I can only comment as a consumer of let's say cheaper "prosumer" cameras. I have been on a lookout for new cameras to replace my two Nikons, D5000 and P7700 (an exchangeable lens camera and one highly capable and versatile compact camera), since more than a year now. I don't have money to throw around and for trying out this and that. I would love to stay with Nikon since I don't like changing platforms if not necessary, but I don't think I will be buying another Nikon anytime soon. It will be a Panasonic mirrorless camera and a Canon compact instead, most likely and soon.

To me Nikon's decisions in the "prosumer" segment (except for the DSLRs) over the last years look like those of a headless chicken. South Park episode Margaritaville comes to mind...

What I meant was that I was looking at cheaper prosumers to replace my present cameras. I am looking at cameras such as Oly EM5 II, Panasonic G85 or Canon M5 to replace the D5000. If I was looking for a DSLR camera it would be on the level of Nikon D7500 or Canon 80D. And in the compact segment it was the never realized DL line that I was looking forward to to replace the P7700. I think all these new cameras can be safely categorized into the lower and of "prosumers". And the P7700 was Nikon's "prosumer" compact camera of the day. The only thing that Nikon has to offer now are competent DSLR cameras - no mirrorless and no prosumer compact cameras over several years.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 11:03 UTC
Total: 34, showing: 1 – 20
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