Luke Kaven

Lives in United States New York, United States
Works as a Researcher/educator, music producer, photographer
Has a website at http://www.lukekaven.com
Joined on Mar 11, 2004
About me:

Researcher/ Educator
President at Smalls Records | www.smallsrecords.com
Featured artist in the HDRI Handbook by Christian Bloch (2nd Ed)

Comments

Total: 214, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF bokeh demystified (349 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrBrightSide: It will be fun to see a shootout between this lens and the new Nikon-two completely different approaches to the same type of lens. DPR should post a bunch of identical portraits shot with the two lenses and let readers vote on their faves.

Nikon 135/2 DC is a special favorite, comes together at about f/3.2.

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2017 at 20:40 UTC

I see it features a "short-fingered" mode with a sycophantic, self-effacing digital assistant. It spends its idle time googling you, and uses state-of-the-art anti-reality filters to deliver only the most glowing praise. It takes blame for things you did. In Conway mode, it thinks up too-long excuses for your worst transgressions.

Now that's value-added.

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2017 at 08:47 UTC as 13th comment
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kaso: "Future advanced features"? I recommend the GIMP developers spend some quality time on the stability, performance and usability qualities of the current implementation. It's exciting to work on new features, but if the baseline is buggy and slow and painful to use, the program will remain a sideline curiosity.

For years, I've tried hard to reach a "critical mass" level of interest in and proficiency with GIMP. No smiles yet.

Alex, thank you for the clarification. You are obviously an authoritative source. Although I seemed to recall that there were serious problems coming up with a 16 bit workflow. Obviously, this was a very late feature to arrive. And I recall other members of your project explaining it in a way very similar to the way I did. I don't mind being set straight, though I don't feel the question is answered.

Nevertheless, I always liked GIMP, believed that many ideas that have gone into it are brilliant, and I feel that plans for the future are strong. I look forward to its next major version very much. Adobe's designers abandoned the idea of innovation a long time ago in Photoshop.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2017 at 11:08 UTC
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kaso: "Future advanced features"? I recommend the GIMP developers spend some quality time on the stability, performance and usability qualities of the current implementation. It's exciting to work on new features, but if the baseline is buggy and slow and painful to use, the program will remain a sideline curiosity.

For years, I've tried hard to reach a "critical mass" level of interest in and proficiency with GIMP. No smiles yet.

Thanks for the correction, TommiK1.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2017 at 10:41 UTC
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kaso: "Future advanced features"? I recommend the GIMP developers spend some quality time on the stability, performance and usability qualities of the current implementation. It's exciting to work on new features, but if the baseline is buggy and slow and painful to use, the program will remain a sideline curiosity.

For years, I've tried hard to reach a "critical mass" level of interest in and proficiency with GIMP. No smiles yet.

A rewrite wasn't optional, as the original GIMP was built on an 8-bit engine, embedded so deep that there was no way to replace it without a complete rewrite. A number of very good updates were proposed to go along with it, most importantly the node-based dataflow language that can be used to specify arbitrarily complex operations that can't be done in any way with Photoshop. But the poor user interface, which I think was originally based in Tk/Tcl was going to be a lead weight on the project. I suspect the present initiative seeks to fix that.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 12:34 UTC
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: If you talk to camera people in Hollywood, it's still the Arri Alexa by far, even though it's only 3.5K. The reason they say is the color grading and the "look", much preferred. The Canon comes in second. And RED has been a fairly distant third. We'll see if this has something new to offer.

Though several big names use Red, the Arri is by far the most popular, followed by the Canon. I don't dislike Red, and hope they are able to be in the game for the long haul.

Link | Posted on Jan 12, 2017 at 07:02 UTC

If you talk to camera people in Hollywood, it's still the Arri Alexa by far, even though it's only 3.5K. The reason they say is the color grading and the "look", much preferred. The Canon comes in second. And RED has been a fairly distant third. We'll see if this has something new to offer.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2017 at 21:28 UTC as 32nd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: There can't be that many places that can make a plausible counterfeit of this lens. All the actors must be known to everyone, which makes it quite a brazen theft. I admit, I never though it was worthwhile economically to counterfeit an SLR lens, until now.

It's not the first product one would think of counterfeiting. It's not like a pair of blue jeans. A lot of tooling, diverse parts, reverse engineering. Surely there aren't that many people who actually supply a range of parts like this. I know much is said about China's manufacturing capacity, but I don't think there are thousands of factories that could make this lens /as readily as that/. You don't invest in this line of manufacturing on a lark, unless you're already engaged in it.

I still think the players are well known to Canon, and perhaps are tied with the people who make the genuine Canon product.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 07:15 UTC

There can't be that many places that can make a plausible counterfeit of this lens. All the actors must be known to everyone, which makes it quite a brazen theft. I admit, I never though it was worthwhile economically to counterfeit an SLR lens, until now.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 22:54 UTC as 60th comment | 4 replies

This is the covering used for the cheapest ping-pong paddles. Real players use foam paddles, which wouldn't make a bad covering for a camera. But it doesn't cost them a cent more to make this gimmicky trash. Show me someone who buys one at twice the price, so I can point and laugh. It's like a Trump camera.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2016 at 10:24 UTC as 82nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Chev Chelios: The rubber surface of pretty much every table tennis bat I've used eventually Starts to peel off. Just sayin'

Price aside, as a piece of art work though I quite like it.

Some copies of this camera will only be seen by X-ray machines through the sealed packaging.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2016 at 10:21 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (147 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wild Light: Hasselblad would certainly win the beauty contest. But it just seems the Fuji is better developed, better priced, has better lenses and IMO, some better features. If it weren't for the fact Fuji was about to release their own system, they would most likely be making lenses for this Blad. The Blad lenses are slower, and the systems leaf shutters mean their lenses will remain slower. I prefer the way the Hasselblad looks, but the Fuji is the camera I will buy.

It is "slower" in the sense that it limits the size of the optical path to only as big as the leaf shutter will allow. But you don't need f/1.4 or even f/2 on a MF camera. An f/2.8 lens is sufficient on the fast end.

You're right about the advantages for fast sync speed. If you have fine control over the strobe timing, you can sync at 1/1000th sec.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 11:07 UTC
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: There is a big difference between increasing dynamic range by increasing the headroom versus lowering the noise floor. One increases DR at the top, the other at the bottom. For cinema cameras advertising 16 stops, the added stops are at the top in the form of overexposure protection. In cinema, you don't want to blow out the sky. But this is not the same as lowering the noise floor, which is where Sony sensors have made the most progress.

AshMills: You didn't understand anything I said. These are two very different ways of solving the problem with very different implications. [Before you pretend to be embarrassed for someone else, you should double-check that you understood them.]

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2016 at 21:06 UTC

There is a big difference between increasing dynamic range by increasing the headroom versus lowering the noise floor. One increases DR at the top, the other at the bottom. For cinema cameras advertising 16 stops, the added stops are at the top in the form of overexposure protection. In cinema, you don't want to blow out the sky. But this is not the same as lowering the noise floor, which is where Sony sensors have made the most progress.

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2016 at 14:35 UTC as 9th comment | 6 replies
On article SmugMug Films: Point, Click, ShootTokyo (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: What a remarkable self-promotion for a photographer whose work seems only average at best. I'm not sure why it ended up here.

If one cares, my site will be back in a couple of weeks. I think you have a different aesthetic sensibility, and some of it is quite nice. I don't think you understood me, but that's ok. I don't feel I need to be embarrassed about my own work, or disqualified from critiquing a feature on DPR. I understood the artists I worked with well.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 16:20 UTC
On article SmugMug Films: Point, Click, ShootTokyo (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: What a remarkable self-promotion for a photographer whose work seems only average at best. I'm not sure why it ended up here.

I didn't think of it that way. He seems like a nice guy. I don't have any reason to think he makes a lot of money. I think he's on a personal journey, living on his own means mostly. And that's cool. I just didn't think the images were enough to hold up as an example.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 13:26 UTC
On article SmugMug Films: Point, Click, ShootTokyo (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: What a remarkable self-promotion for a photographer whose work seems only average at best. I'm not sure why it ended up here.

I just didn't think they were special enough to merit front-page coverage. As the next commenter down says "video footage was more interesting than the photos". I did not see elements of good composition or a good street style. Liked the video though.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 12:54 UTC
On article SmugMug Films: Point, Click, ShootTokyo (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: What a remarkable self-promotion for a photographer whose work seems only average at best. I'm not sure why it ended up here.

@LegacyGT - Oui.
- WRX

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 01:50 UTC
On article SmugMug Films: Point, Click, ShootTokyo (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

Luke Kaven: What a remarkable self-promotion for a photographer whose work seems only average at best. I'm not sure why it ended up here.

Do feel free. My site is going back up in a week, but there is a flickr profile in the meantime.

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2016 at 20:45 UTC
On article SmugMug Films: Point, Click, ShootTokyo (36 comments in total)

What a remarkable self-promotion for a photographer whose work seems only average at best. I'm not sure why it ended up here.

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2016 at 15:19 UTC as 6th comment | 15 replies
Total: 214, showing: 1 – 20
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