Alec

Alec

Lives in United States New York City, NY, United States
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at http://karasevstudio.com/
Joined on Oct 24, 2000
About me:

I'm a photographer serving New York City’s theatre and fashion industries as well as industrial and advertising photography needs of the city’s businesses. My O2 (Optically Opinionated) blog contains ideas, tips, and industry commentary.

Comments

Total: 218, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

abudiman: I'm not sure if there's any high quality c-mount lenses out there, or if any, still on production. They should opt for m43 mount. The video is awesome but dragged down by poor lenses. Low contrast and CA is everywhere.

There are, just few big zoom ones. The fixed-focal lenses for security cameras are fairly sharp nowadays as security cameras enter 4-5MP resolution range.

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2016 at 06:03 UTC
In reply to:

Alec: OK if we look back, Apple did it before with USB. USB was widely seen as technically excellent but struggling for acceptance on any platform, because, chicken-and-egg problem: PC makers don't want it because no peripherals, and peripheral makers don't invest because, no PCs have it.

Until Apple decided to ditch mouse / keyboard / serial port etc and ONLY have USB. It single-handedly saved USB.

Yes, it is inconvenient in a short term, but c'mon. This new connector is clearly superior and in a couple of years it'll be everywhere.

BTW I'm not an Apple fan. Don't even have Apple. Typing this on a Dell XPS13, with one Thunderbolt 3 port.

Like I mentioned in the original message, laptops used to carry 9-pin serial port, parallel printer port and the PS2 keyboard and mouse connectors. Apple replaced them all with USB, and initially people complained but soon enough the manufacturers responded by making all peripherals USB. If Apple hand't done that, nobody else would have had the resolve to break the chicken-and-egg problem (leave old ports in place because too few peripherals and don't bother switching peripherals to new port because old ones are there).

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2016 at 20:28 UTC
In reply to:

Alec: OK if we look back, Apple did it before with USB. USB was widely seen as technically excellent but struggling for acceptance on any platform, because, chicken-and-egg problem: PC makers don't want it because no peripherals, and peripheral makers don't invest because, no PCs have it.

Until Apple decided to ditch mouse / keyboard / serial port etc and ONLY have USB. It single-handedly saved USB.

Yes, it is inconvenient in a short term, but c'mon. This new connector is clearly superior and in a couple of years it'll be everywhere.

BTW I'm not an Apple fan. Don't even have Apple. Typing this on a Dell XPS13, with one Thunderbolt 3 port.

Legacy devices, yes, but let's face it, the classic USB connector is stupid. Ever tried to connect it blind to the back of a PC? It manages to be the wrong way, like, 75% of the time (when it should only be 50%, statistically). And how about that mini USB and the practically same-size micro, and the USB3 mini which isn't "mini"? How many USB connectors of every ilk are there? If you set aside "I already have an XYZ device", at its face value, how stupid is that?? HDMI and DisplayPort, again, difficult to tell apart by touch on the back of device.

Here, we have one connector that can do all of their job, plus power, is more robust than all of them, can be inserted either side, and is small enough for mobile devices. A slam-dunk if there ever was one.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2016 at 21:01 UTC

OK if we look back, Apple did it before with USB. USB was widely seen as technically excellent but struggling for acceptance on any platform, because, chicken-and-egg problem: PC makers don't want it because no peripherals, and peripheral makers don't invest because, no PCs have it.

Until Apple decided to ditch mouse / keyboard / serial port etc and ONLY have USB. It single-handedly saved USB.

Yes, it is inconvenient in a short term, but c'mon. This new connector is clearly superior and in a couple of years it'll be everywhere.

BTW I'm not an Apple fan. Don't even have Apple. Typing this on a Dell XPS13, with one Thunderbolt 3 port.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2016 at 02:50 UTC as 92nd comment | 6 replies

The only thing that prevents me from buying it is I already own and use for several years their previous version, and it is amazing!

Over the years I've had lots of backpacks, bags, etc., and still use them on rare occasions. But for a pro this black and neat square format has the right image, plus your suit's shoulders aren't messed up with straps and your back isn't sweaty from the backpack. These are huge practical advantages when interacting with clients or talent or other people - unless none of them care for you.

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2016 at 13:40 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

Alec: I expect, SONY will follow suit with a medium format mirrorless with a particularly short flange distance - a feature that has served its full-frame mirrorless so well in terms of 3rd party lens support.

It would be lovely to be able to mount a full-frame lens and select a "native" aspect ratio (with a 43mm diagonal at all aspect ratios not just "native" - they'd all be native) between 1:1 square format and 2.39:1 for video. Maybe even a 43mm round format for a fisheye :)

@ jacketpotato , they do have some inter-company code of ethics; however, in one of the wider known examples, JVC had lead SONY to believe they would make Betamax and got some valuable R&D insights, then with NO heads-up to SONY came out with VHS. The bottom line is, implicit or even explicit promises are broken sometimes.

Unless SONY (or whichever other company) owes medium-format incumbents some favors for their sharing some trade secret info and insights, there'd be no appreciable ethical barrier to entering that field.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 13:01 UTC
In reply to:

Elliot H: to many, medium format is 6X6 - 6X7
however in 2016, everything's hyped

Yeah, 2MP used to be "film quality". LOL. I remember years ago some "independent Nikon photographer" shot some frames on 6x7 vs some 6MP Nikon, and of course Nikon won. Never mind that a lens on that Nikon never optically formed a medium format image, and was knocked further down with the anti-aliasing filter.

The reality is, whatever the year, they need to move merch like clockwork, otherwise there won't be money to meet monthly payroll and other expenses. So they keep coming up with stuff we're supposed to buy. And we're addicted. They don't put "Good" on boxes, they put "New". Most of the time, "New" is better, although elevated amount of BS and hype has to take place when that's not the case across the board (like 35mm -> APS, and film -> digital).

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 05:55 UTC
In reply to:

Joachim Gerstl: Finally I can take a 51,4MP picture of my cat.

I think folks have been saying that ever since 2MP.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 05:42 UTC

I expect, SONY will follow suit with a medium format mirrorless with a particularly short flange distance - a feature that has served its full-frame mirrorless so well in terms of 3rd party lens support.

It would be lovely to be able to mount a full-frame lens and select a "native" aspect ratio (with a 43mm diagonal at all aspect ratios not just "native" - they'd all be native) between 1:1 square format and 2.39:1 for video. Maybe even a 43mm round format for a fisheye :)

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2016 at 05:40 UTC as 54th comment | 5 replies
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: Very impressive the first couple of minutes and gets boring after a while... Don't get me wrong, it is a great work! But my attention span may have been put off by that Enya like music. Not for everyone's cup of cappuccino, but impressive nonetheless.
Well done visuals, garage band music.

.

I don't think it's overdone, it just doesn't seem to have a rhyme or rhythm - or at least those that resonate with me (and you apparently). This is something where Ron Fricke's films excel.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 02:03 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joe Ogiba: 4K UHD screenshot:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8801/28954111170_06440a8088_o.png

TF?? Who's that guy at my place?

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:56 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rob890: Technically its really nice, however it doesn't feel as if a story is being told rather a sort of showcase the skill of the person's skill. Also I stopped watching after 2 min, for it stared of become repetitive to me. New York City is more than just Mid-town and Lower Manhattan.

I think it got the author some well deserved notoriety in his Director of Photography capacity.

Rob890 is absolutely right of course - but not every photographer is a natural-born writer (the camera being incidental) - not many, in fact, realize they even ought to aim to be that.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:54 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

PanoMax: One thing still to be resolved: converging vertical lines to parallel for perspective control. Now THAT would be innovation in video.

The other would be to eliminate the stroboscopic effect which make rotating wagon wheels appear to rotate backwards in movies or videos!

@cdembrey I didn't know they did. I think we're yet to see an artistically valid use of the tilt motion for something other than "hey, here's tilt on video!!," but I'm sure it's coming sooner or later.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:51 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

msegel: Too F'cking Amazing.

Too bad my screen only goes up to 4K

I think the author is hoping the footage would still be relevant 8 years from now.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:47 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Uschold: It's 8K. OK. How could anyone tell? Does this footage in any way shape or form distinguish itself from what could have been done with 4K or HD? One thing might be the ability to zoom in, but how noticeable would that be? Would it be just showing off, or could it add significantly to the viewer's experience?

I recently made an 11x16 print from a Canon S45 4 megapixel camera. I was surprised at how sharp and vibrant it was. For that size, more megapixels only enables more cropping, not more quality.

So how does it work for 8K? What technology do you need to notice a significant difference?

Any 640x480 or 720x480 digital footage from a few short years ago is not very useful commercially nowadays. If you're going to pay a very real logistical cost for a serious project (clearly the case here), you'd want the resulting asset to have as much life as possible out of the gate. If he or she could have done it in 16K today, they would have.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:43 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Yake: The angle of the stitched Bentley logo looks wrong. They seem to have rotated it to be near horizontal. It should match the angle of the seat and the roofline, which would make it more diagonal.

Also, the vertical suspension wires of the bridge have motion blur toward the bottom but not toward the top?

Who knows, maybe they'd stitched it on crooked.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2016 at 03:10 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulDavis: Looks like the car was just photoshopped into the image. The angle and perspective of the car doesn't even look quite right. Not sure how you get motion blur on a stitched image as if the camera is following the car?!

This type work should be like a magic trick where people can't figure out how it was done because the technique was flawless. This one looks like the rough draft shown to the boss to show where the project is going.

What a surprise, the passenger chair has perfect lit so we can all see the logo on the seat, even though the sun is clearly at the seats back. Also amazingly there are no reflections on that part of the window.

peterwr I did not know that!! In the 80s and 90s, spinners (fake rims that keep spinning after the car has stopped) and then stillers (weighed faux rims that stay still while the car is in motion) were popular in not such good parts of many a town.

This doesn't strike me personally as a luxury detail - branding that goes out of its way to be clearly seen is a general trait for middle-class aspiration brands. Who knows, maybe Bentley is moving to capture an upper slice of the middle-class market.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2016 at 03:06 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulDavis: Looks like the car was just photoshopped into the image. The angle and perspective of the car doesn't even look quite right. Not sure how you get motion blur on a stitched image as if the camera is following the car?!

This type work should be like a magic trick where people can't figure out how it was done because the technique was flawless. This one looks like the rough draft shown to the boss to show where the project is going.

What a surprise, the passenger chair has perfect lit so we can all see the logo on the seat, even though the sun is clearly at the seats back. Also amazingly there are no reflections on that part of the window.

P.S. I just thought of this: if one does truly use a "NASA-inspired robotic head", in theory it is possible to track the moving car in the "money shot" and then dial in identical motion (or appropriately changing depending on patch position in the final image) for all the robotically executed shots.

That's in theory. In practice, that head looks much too flimsy to not just point the lens but precisely replicate the motion during the exposure. I'd envisioned something akin to what we see in the Apollo 13 movie in a scene leading up to the launch, set in the VIP observation deck.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 15:28 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)

That's a great piece of Corinthian Leather.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 15:15 UTC as 57th comment
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulDavis: Looks like the car was just photoshopped into the image. The angle and perspective of the car doesn't even look quite right. Not sure how you get motion blur on a stitched image as if the camera is following the car?!

This type work should be like a magic trick where people can't figure out how it was done because the technique was flawless. This one looks like the rough draft shown to the boss to show where the project is going.

What a surprise, the passenger chair has perfect lit so we can all see the logo on the seat, even though the sun is clearly at the seats back. Also amazingly there are no reflections on that part of the window.

Nothing is random in a car commercial - one is allowed to bounce extra light onto the subject and even back up the car a certain distance and turn the wheels such that both B's on the hubs are exactly upright when it rolls back into the designated spot. Certainly choosing an angle where the seat (only the main point of the campaign) is not obscured by windshield reflections was an obvious priority early on. ALL that said, I do agree with you - that front passenger seat lighting and motion blur on the bridge certainly do not fit into the narrative.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 15:08 UTC
Total: 218, showing: 1 – 20
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