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Alec

Alec

Lives in United States New York City, NY, United States
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at http://karasevstudio.com/
Joined on Oct 24, 2000
About me:

I'm a photographer serving New York City’s theatre and fashion industries as well as industrial and advertising photography needs of the city’s businesses. My O2 (Optically Opinionated) blog contains ideas, tips, and industry commentary.

Comments

Total: 209, showing: 1 – 20
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On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: Very impressive the first couple of minutes and gets boring after a while... Don't get me wrong, it is a great work! But my attention span may have been put off by that Enya like music. Not for everyone's cup of cappuccino, but impressive nonetheless.
Well done visuals, garage band music.

.

I don't think it's overdone, it just doesn't seem to have a rhyme or rhythm - or at least those that resonate with me (and you apparently). This is something where Ron Fricke's films excel.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 02:03 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joe Ogiba: 4K UHD screenshot:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8801/28954111170_06440a8088_o.png

TF?? Who's that guy at my place?

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:56 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rob890: Technically its really nice, however it doesn't feel as if a story is being told rather a sort of showcase the skill of the person's skill. Also I stopped watching after 2 min, for it stared of become repetitive to me. New York City is more than just Mid-town and Lower Manhattan.

I think it got the author some well deserved notoriety in his Director of Photography capacity.

Rob890 is absolutely right of course - but not every photographer is a natural-born writer (the camera being incidental) - not many, in fact, realize they even ought to aim to be that.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:54 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

PanoMax: One thing still to be resolved: converging vertical lines to parallel for perspective control. Now THAT would be innovation in video.

The other would be to eliminate the stroboscopic effect which make rotating wagon wheels appear to rotate backwards in movies or videos!

@cdembrey I didn't know they did. I think we're yet to see an artistically valid use of the tilt motion for something other than "hey, here's tilt on video!!," but I'm sure it's coming sooner or later.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:51 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

msegel: Too F'cking Amazing.

Too bad my screen only goes up to 4K

I think the author is hoping the footage would still be relevant 8 years from now.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:47 UTC
On article This vibrant hyper-lapse shows off New York in 8K (69 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael Uschold: It's 8K. OK. How could anyone tell? Does this footage in any way shape or form distinguish itself from what could have been done with 4K or HD? One thing might be the ability to zoom in, but how noticeable would that be? Would it be just showing off, or could it add significantly to the viewer's experience?

I recently made an 11x16 print from a Canon S45 4 megapixel camera. I was surprised at how sharp and vibrant it was. For that size, more megapixels only enables more cropping, not more quality.

So how does it work for 8K? What technology do you need to notice a significant difference?

Any 640x480 or 720x480 digital footage from a few short years ago is not very useful commercially nowadays. If you're going to pay a very real logistical cost for a serious project (clearly the case here), you'd want the resulting asset to have as much life as possible out of the gate. If he or she could have done it in 16K today, they would have.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 01:43 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Yake: The angle of the stitched Bentley logo looks wrong. They seem to have rotated it to be near horizontal. It should match the angle of the seat and the roofline, which would make it more diagonal.

Also, the vertical suspension wires of the bridge have motion blur toward the bottom but not toward the top?

Who knows, maybe they'd stitched it on crooked.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2016 at 03:10 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulDavis: Looks like the car was just photoshopped into the image. The angle and perspective of the car doesn't even look quite right. Not sure how you get motion blur on a stitched image as if the camera is following the car?!

This type work should be like a magic trick where people can't figure out how it was done because the technique was flawless. This one looks like the rough draft shown to the boss to show where the project is going.

What a surprise, the passenger chair has perfect lit so we can all see the logo on the seat, even though the sun is clearly at the seats back. Also amazingly there are no reflections on that part of the window.

peterwr I did not know that!! In the 80s and 90s, spinners (fake rims that keep spinning after the car has stopped) and then stillers (weighed faux rims that stay still while the car is in motion) were popular in not such good parts of many a town.

This doesn't strike me personally as a luxury detail - branding that goes out of its way to be clearly seen is a general trait for middle-class aspiration brands. Who knows, maybe Bentley is moving to capture an upper slice of the middle-class market.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2016 at 03:06 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulDavis: Looks like the car was just photoshopped into the image. The angle and perspective of the car doesn't even look quite right. Not sure how you get motion blur on a stitched image as if the camera is following the car?!

This type work should be like a magic trick where people can't figure out how it was done because the technique was flawless. This one looks like the rough draft shown to the boss to show where the project is going.

What a surprise, the passenger chair has perfect lit so we can all see the logo on the seat, even though the sun is clearly at the seats back. Also amazingly there are no reflections on that part of the window.

P.S. I just thought of this: if one does truly use a "NASA-inspired robotic head", in theory it is possible to track the moving car in the "money shot" and then dial in identical motion (or appropriately changing depending on patch position in the final image) for all the robotically executed shots.

That's in theory. In practice, that head looks much too flimsy to not just point the lens but precisely replicate the motion during the exposure. I'd envisioned something akin to what we see in the Apollo 13 movie in a scene leading up to the launch, set in the VIP observation deck.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 15:28 UTC
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)

That's a great piece of Corinthian Leather.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 15:15 UTC as 57th comment
On article Bentley creates a 53 billion pixel car commercial (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulDavis: Looks like the car was just photoshopped into the image. The angle and perspective of the car doesn't even look quite right. Not sure how you get motion blur on a stitched image as if the camera is following the car?!

This type work should be like a magic trick where people can't figure out how it was done because the technique was flawless. This one looks like the rough draft shown to the boss to show where the project is going.

What a surprise, the passenger chair has perfect lit so we can all see the logo on the seat, even though the sun is clearly at the seats back. Also amazingly there are no reflections on that part of the window.

Nothing is random in a car commercial - one is allowed to bounce extra light onto the subject and even back up the car a certain distance and turn the wheels such that both B's on the hubs are exactly upright when it rolls back into the designated spot. Certainly choosing an angle where the seat (only the main point of the campaign) is not obscured by windshield reflections was an obvious priority early on. ALL that said, I do agree with you - that front passenger seat lighting and motion blur on the bridge certainly do not fit into the narrative.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 15:08 UTC
In reply to:

HSway: Samyang produces some excellent optics. It needs to improve its sample variation record, though, based on common user practice and snap-shot sample variance data provided by lensrentals where among 42 entries Samyang’s performance sits at the very bottom of the group. It’s a shame for the lenses can really be very good. And perhaps this is improving. They also brought AF lenses to the market suggesting they can go beyond what they were known for.

These lenses have identical optical formulae to their still photo and non-Xeen video oriented siblings in Samyang's lineup.

So they do breathe when focusing.

If you do not use a follow focus rig (or do but do not change lenses often), it may be a better value to get a "plain" motion Samyang and save a bundle. However if you change lenses during shoots in a rig / have a crew, the sole fact that you do not have to reconfigure the rig when changing the lenses may pay for the price difference in a few shoots.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 01:20 UTC
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

estarkey: Like minds think alike! Great article very similar to a post I made here a few days ago.
http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/58048141

Not alike! Your post is better than this article by a very substantial margin - as measured by the improvement they could make to the target audience's footage.

A key thing in a motion picture is having something to say, because while pointless or self-serving stills are just that, a pointless or self-serving video is insufferable. Next comes forethought on how to say it using the motion picture language, in a way that is clear and eloquent. Then the execution, making sure you've not forgotten to shoot the "words" and "sentences" needed to tell the story. Lastly, piecing it together in editing.

It is pretty absurd to worry about color grading ahead of contemplating the actual point. That said, Richard's summaries of the video-specific technical issues including sound and camera motion are lucid and supported by well-crafted media. Good job Richard!

As for the legacy-free video editor that emphasizes digital tools such as histograms and tone curves, I'd recommend SONY Vegas Pro.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 07:05 UTC
On article Special K? Pentax K-1 Review (2652 comments in total)

I just want to give thanks where due for the camera's design. From the front, it just looks so completely like a real camera ought to look. Sony A900 had that same design intent, and both these cameras share the distinction of being the first to reward their patient lens mount followers with a full frame digital body.

Love the K1 and I'm sure it won't disappoint its users.

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2016 at 18:31 UTC as 153rd comment
On article Sony warns against use of unauthorized third-party apps (183 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sir Corey of Deane: Sony markets a camera with a specification which the warranty backs. Can anyone really criticise Sony for voiding that warranty if the specification is altered by modifying it?

I think it's not their warranty dept's, but rather their business decision that's come under criticism, to forfeit the advantages Apple and Google have made obvious, of opening up an exciting hardware platform to 3rd party apps.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 12:51 UTC

They've probably rested on their laurels, as opposed to making sure the portraits they've made continue to wow.

'How can you expect that a studio can operate in this generation where everyone is clicking photos from their mobiles and digital cameras?'

This says a lot. It takes love and sweat, it takes investing in your employees, your clients, your space, to continuously build on the quality of your work, thus and reinforcing your brand. It's a lot cheaper and easier to just milk your name until it runs dry - hiring cheap labor and giving them "tell the client to smile then press this button" training, hence turning out glorified passport photos instead of portraits - until a day comes when a critical mass of your clients realize, that nephew with a D500 does legitimately take a better photo.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2016 at 19:09 UTC as 15th comment | 4 replies
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (460 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alec: Hasselblad A7RII, with a wooden grip. Actually the entire camera is made of wood, including the optics. Highly collectible.

Besides the general limited edition, serial #s 1 through 100 will be "exclusive premier select limited", made of the rarest wood species responsibly hand-picked and salvaged. Will come with a VHS tape of celebrities, brand ambassadors, company management and other qualified individuals sharing how holding the Hasselblad A7RII makes them feel completely differently from any other camera.

@Calte, @Dynaxx, Hasselblad have made some exciting high end cameras. Had people bought Lunar and Stellar en masse, the joke would have been on them. Since they haven't, the joke is on Hassy. The reality is, there were plenty of opportunities to tune Lunar and Stellar software algorithms, menus and features to appeal to the sophisticated / more IQ oriented (vs speed) target photographer, that Hasselblad missed in Lunar and Stellar.

...Or, perhaps, in the same target market vein, and since they were so obsessed about the grip, they could have integrated the vertical grip, even if that meant just using the 10 extended base screws into the standard body casting, through a tweaked bottom grip enclosure, resulting in a tighter body and a more seamless appearance.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 15:09 UTC
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (460 comments in total)

Hasselblad A7RII, with a wooden grip. Actually the entire camera is made of wood, including the optics. Highly collectible.

Besides the general limited edition, serial #s 1 through 100 will be "exclusive premier select limited", made of the rarest wood species responsibly hand-picked and salvaged. Will come with a VHS tape of celebrities, brand ambassadors, company management and other qualified individuals sharing how holding the Hasselblad A7RII makes them feel completely differently from any other camera.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 03:05 UTC as 136th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

webber15: Not so "mobile" with all the add'ons...might as well use a real camera...

I agree it looks pretty absurd for just taking plain pictures. That said, there may be business needs and other use cases where an iPhone has to be the camera of choice, because of a particular mobile app needing to be involved, or network connectivity outside of wifi.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 22:43 UTC
In reply to:

mario GTI: It is cool if you are only limited to iPhone as far as image taking, it gives you the ability to change lenses and have a nicer handling by adding grip.
However, it is pointless if you already own any decent dedicated camera. Plus it would be PITA to normally use the phone with this thing attached.

I think it is for situations where an iPhone has to be used due to connectivity or specific apps.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 22:40 UTC
Total: 209, showing: 1 – 20
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