Keith Cooper

Keith Cooper

Lives in United Kingdom Leicester, United Kingdom
Works as a Commercial Pro Photographer
Joined on Feb 16, 2003
About me:

Lots of photography articles and reviews on the Northlight site - see the latest at:
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/photography-articles-and-reviews/

My book: Using tilt/shift lenses
https://crowood.com/details.asp?isbn=9781785007712

My real work:
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/commercial-photography/

Comments

Total: 129, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

WSLam: No Tilt? Just Shift?

There is now a thread in the 3rd party lens forum with more details about this lens, based on my using it for aa few weeks
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64619332

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2020 at 19:08 UTC
In reply to:

WSLam: No Tilt? Just Shift?

No, not really ;-)
But some wondered how the ±11mm of shift on the 15 would look against the ±12mm of shift on the 17mm.
As with many things photographic - easier just to take a few shots to see ;-)

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2020 at 14:24 UTC
In reply to:

WSLam: No Tilt? Just Shift?

Yes, it's a shift only lens. Many find shift by far the most useful function for such a wide lens. I use the Canon 17mm T/S a lot and tilt is almost always locked at zero.

I've one here at the moment for testing and its coverage (even with a bit less shift) is wider than the TS-E17- There is an example in the Canon lens forum at https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64548881

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2020 at 10:38 UTC
In reply to:

Parry Johnson: Is it just me, or is there a lack of depth with shift images at this extreme wide angle? I think the row houses look more like cardboard cut outs, and depth cues have to be taken from closer objects or potentially disruptive buildings at the sides. I'd prefer the more natural 24mm TS look any day.

Yes, the wide angle does need some care in use in this respect. For myself it's been tremendously useful when you just need the coverage and don't have a viewpoint that lets you use a longer FL.
A lot depends for me on who the picture's for ;-)

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2020 at 22:40 UTC
In reply to:

jmknights1954: Why oh why is this not a Tilt and Shift lens?
Please explain why to me.

Because for a significant proportion of potential users, tilt is not an essential function at this focal length

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2020 at 22:01 UTC
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: The fact that no cost is wasted on tilting shows they are pretty savvy. For years we used Nikkor and Schneider shift lenses with no thought of tilt. Why? Because the main use of tilts was to get extra depth of field from view camera lenses which were mostly 65mm or longer. A 15mm or 17mm lens has so much depth of field, I can't find a use for the tilts unless it's used for a very expensive "toy train" effect.

An added benefit of not having tilt capability is no possibility of inaccurately returning the lens to the zero, un-tilted position. On my Canon TS lenses, the zero detent is not that precise. If it's decent, I would assume this will be the lens of choice for Nikon users, given the enormous price difference.

My problem with using tilt for 'expanding' depth of field is that it relies on being able to place the tilted plane of focus through your desired sharp bits of the scene. Now, when this works it's really nifty, but when the scene doesn't play ball it can be problematic. I find my personal choices for composition in landscape rarely help me make much use of tilt.

Personally, tilt is relatively rare for me to use for architectural use - that's where shift is what matters. It does come very handy for setting the plane of focus along a wall/floor/ceiling and given the choice, I'd have it there.

However if I was short of money and wanted an ultrawide shift, I suspect the Laowa not having tilt would be far from a showstopper.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2020 at 19:50 UTC
In reply to:

SonyX: Like many other MF lenses, Nikon F version - is the most practical choice, can be adopter to any camera mount.

No, there is just one optical design listed. The lens just has a different 'back end' for different mounts as far as I know. Laowa have produced different designs sometimes, but this one shows no signs of it (I will check though)

Mount vignetting at strong shift is a subtle effect. It goes at ~f/5.6 for the tse17 and ~f/8 for the Nikon PC-E19mm - the difference looks almost entirely due to the throat diameter. I usually test this in my tilt/shift reviews. It's not a big problem but can affect stitching a pair of say up/down stitched images. That said, you'd tend to use both lenses at F/8 or more, with large shift, so it's not something I usually worry about.
Which should give very good performance when Nikon do a tilt/shift for Z mount

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2020 at 20:07 UTC
In reply to:

SonyX: Like many other MF lenses, Nikon F version - is the most practical choice, can be adopter to any camera mount.

No, I'd pick the wider EF mount to adapt to MF for example

The smaller F mount introduces more elements of mount vignetting at stronger shift (the wide aperture vignetting on the opposite side to the normal image circle vignetting)

I've one on its way to test and was offered EF or F

Of course, more mounts will appear - I was told

Canon EF and Nikon F available by late Nov, 2020
Canon RF, Nikon Z, Sony FE are due Feb, 2021

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2020 at 16:50 UTC

I'd previously started a thread in the 3rd party lens forum, since they are currently shipping one to me for review.
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/64508839
I'm hoping to have it here next week, and will definitely be matching it up to my TS-E17 (on a 5Ds) I'll post when it's here - any questions, just let me know?

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2020 at 16:39 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

GRUBERND: If I had the time I'd built something like this with an Arduino. Shouldn't be too hard to beat that 85% accuracy.

Yes, I had a big list of questions when they contacted me ;-)

I'll be doing a review in due course and see what it actually does - if nothing else, my wife wants to try it or decorating...

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2020 at 21:48 UTC
In reply to:

GRUBERND: If I had the time I'd built something like this with an Arduino. Shouldn't be too hard to beat that 85% accuracy.

My feeling is that their particular use of '% accuracy' is causing the difficulties. I asked them about this and it relates to matching results to a large collection of swatches.

I'm not defending the wording in the press release - I picked up on it when they contacted me to ask if I'd check the device.

Of course, on a site like this '85%' is an invitation for the 'color experts' to deliver a swift kicking ...deserved or not ;-)

Reliably and accurately reading a colour of a painted surface is a complex matter, and there is still the matter of acquiring a suitable dataset to use in producing useful information from the measurement data.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2020 at 19:53 UTC
In reply to:

GRUBERND: If I had the time I'd built something like this with an Arduino. Shouldn't be too hard to beat that 85% accuracy.

Actually, unless you have a lot of experience in paint colour science it probably would be. The 85% is the matching accuracy for large swatch sets.
That means even if your homebrew sensor is exceedingly good, you most likely wouldn't have the relevant datasets to make use of it?

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2020 at 08:51 UTC

Interesting device - I'm told that one is 'in the post'

The 85% figure that people are (rightly) picking up on depends on the range of colours you want to match. It's not the same as X-Rite/datacolor releasing a spectro for profiling with 85% accuracy (a shot in the foot for sure)

Some may know that I test quite a lot of printers and colour management kit - this is outside of that

It only works with a phone app. The highest level device in the range also has an LCD, but you'd need to write down the numbers...

Basically, don't think of this device in the same way as you would for making colour profiles or screen calibration. It comes from a major part of Datacolor's business, which is industrial paint mixing, which is distinctly outside my colour management experience.

It has generated interest at home in that it supports Farrow & Ball colours, where I'm told there are examples throughout my house (who knew? ;-) ) I'm curious to see if it has any uses for me as a photographer?

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2020 at 08:45 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: As yet, I've seen no sign of announcements from other parts of Canon? Anyone seen anything?

I've asked about it and if there's any specific news I'll post in the printing forum.
Definitely looking forward to pitting this one against the excellent PRO-300 I've got here (see the printing forum for discussions).

Oh yes, I'd prefer larger. I was though surprised just how many prints/profiling-targets I was able to get after initially setting up the PRO-300.

Personally I like bigger prints, so such printers tend to come with bigger ink tanks.

Link | Posted on Sep 4, 2020 at 21:14 UTC

As yet, I've seen no sign of announcements from other parts of Canon? Anyone seen anything?

I've asked about it and if there's any specific news I'll post in the printing forum.
Definitely looking forward to pitting this one against the excellent PRO-300 I've got here (see the printing forum for discussions).

Link | Posted on Sep 3, 2020 at 18:27 UTC as 32nd comment | 3 replies
On article Canon debuts imageProGraf Pro-300 13" inkjet printer (45 comments in total)
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: An interesting update to the PRO-10 which addresses many complaints about its limitations.

I've had one to test for a few weeks and would note:
-It's fixed margin/borderless problems of the PRO-10 for all media
-Page length now up to 39"
-A colour screen on the front (not touch)
-A bit smaller and quite a bit lighter
-Looks like a smaller version of the PRO-1000
-The new Canon print software is rather nice to use

Happy to answer any specific queries, whilst it's still sitting in my kitchen ;-)

If you go to the review on the Northlight Images site there is some stuff about B&W, but there is also a whole separate article just devoted to B&W on the PRO-300.

I also did one covering the media Config Tool (MCT) for setting up custom papers.

BTW I've now got a P700 here as well - so if anyone has questions, see the thread in the print forum

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2020 at 20:22 UTC
On article Canon debuts imageProGraf Pro-300 13" inkjet printer (45 comments in total)
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: An interesting update to the PRO-10 which addresses many complaints about its limitations.

I've had one to test for a few weeks and would note:
-It's fixed margin/borderless problems of the PRO-10 for all media
-Page length now up to 39"
-A colour screen on the front (not touch)
-A bit smaller and quite a bit lighter
-Looks like a smaller version of the PRO-1000
-The new Canon print software is rather nice to use

Happy to answer any specific queries, whilst it's still sitting in my kitchen ;-)

Both as far as I know - we only have Macs here, so that's what I test on.

I can't directly compare since my PRO-10 review was years ago and I don't have any prints. Canon are saying there is an improvement (well, they would) but it's likely to be relatively small, since if it was huge it would imply the PRO-10 was poor, which it definitely wasn't.
The big changes are paper related, which were my main complaints about the PRO-10
It's good enough that if anyone can't make great looking prints then it's their photography/editing skills that are wanting ;-)
(oh, and I include myself in that!)

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2020 at 16:12 UTC
On article Canon debuts imageProGraf Pro-300 13" inkjet printer (45 comments in total)
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: An interesting update to the PRO-10 which addresses many complaints about its limitations.

I've had one to test for a few weeks and would note:
-It's fixed margin/borderless problems of the PRO-10 for all media
-Page length now up to 39"
-A colour screen on the front (not touch)
-A bit smaller and quite a bit lighter
-Looks like a smaller version of the PRO-1000
-The new Canon print software is rather nice to use

Happy to answer any specific queries, whilst it's still sitting in my kitchen ;-)

Same 14.4ml - The carts I had with the printer were starter carts. Usage would suggest that they have a bit more in for priming etc. I've written a long review which has some more data, but the difficulty when testing is that I'm doing a lot of profiling and test sheets as well as pics. Canon suggest that the yield is improved over the PRO-10

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2020 at 13:04 UTC
On article Canon debuts imageProGraf Pro-300 13" inkjet printer (45 comments in total)

An interesting update to the PRO-10 which addresses many complaints about its limitations.

I've had one to test for a few weeks and would note:
-It's fixed margin/borderless problems of the PRO-10 for all media
-Page length now up to 39"
-A colour screen on the front (not touch)
-A bit smaller and quite a bit lighter
-Looks like a smaller version of the PRO-1000
-The new Canon print software is rather nice to use

Happy to answer any specific queries, whilst it's still sitting in my kitchen ;-)

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2020 at 12:54 UTC as 15th comment | 11 replies

Good video for the -useful- filters...

I recently came by a collection of assorted coloured filters from 'B&W film days' and had a look at how they worked with colour images converted to B&W.

Not very well - I'd suspected that the three channels of an RGB sensor don't correspond to the smooth spectral sensitivity curve of a B&W film but an experiment's always best to check.

Fine if you want to add a red/yellow/orange/green cast to images (although WB may try and fix it) but not the contrast/tonality effects you'd get with B&W film.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2020 at 08:46 UTC as 75th comment
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