Keith Cooper

Keith Cooper

Lives in United Kingdom Leicester, United Kingdom
Works as a Commercial Pro Photographer
Joined on Feb 16, 2003
About me:

Lots of photography articles and reviews on the Northlight site - see the latest at:
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/photography-articles-and-reviews/

The original Canon Rumours pages are at:
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/rumours-page/

My real work:
http://architecture-photos.co.uk/
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/commercial-photography/

...and as for gear lists, don't get me started -- who cares :-) :-)

Comments

Total: 60, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Canon launches refillable ink printers in the UK (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: I'd rather buy a monitor. Who prints anymore?

"Ink jet printing is a nightmare back then and still is ..... it is unreliable technology..."

I'm inclined to suggest that this is arrant nonsense - modern higher end printers are principally limited by lack of user expertise in photography and editing.

And yes I do have to include myself in that category sometimes ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 23:23 UTC
On article Canon launches refillable ink printers in the UK (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: More junk to sell people...
Considering folks have been converting existing printers with specialised ink systems for ages, is there any reason for them to release new printers at all?
Oh yeah, those landfills aren't quite big enough yet..

Ah yes "Facebook, Instagram, Tablets, Smartphones and TVs."

Fortunately for people doing high quality printing, all this stuff has a long way to go with practicality and quality at any decent size. Maybe a bit less so with tiny A4 prints on 4 colour printers...

I think it will be a long while until I'm allowed to put up eight 24" x 36" TV screens in our lounge just for showing photos ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 23:12 UTC
On article Canon launches refillable ink printers in the UK (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

virtualreality: Nice move, but Epson has large (eco)tanks for years.

Also unfortunately at the 4 ink commodity printing end of the market (but they do at least go to A3)

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 22:43 UTC
On article Canon launches refillable ink printers in the UK (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: More junk to sell people...
Considering folks have been converting existing printers with specialised ink systems for ages, is there any reason for them to release new printers at all?
Oh yeah, those landfills aren't quite big enough yet..

Such conversions work nicely until they don't.

In years of testing printers, I've never found such a system I'd want to use myself.

I'm minded to consider that relatively few people using them actually get anywhere the benefits they expect/hope for. I've seen far too many -sold- to people with no idea of true costs.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 22:25 UTC
On article Canon launches refillable ink printers in the UK (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

mosc: I'd rather buy a monitor. Who prints anymore?

Lots of people do - the printing forum here is testament to that. I have monitors as well as printers ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 22:12 UTC
On article Canon launches refillable ink printers in the UK (132 comments in total)

At four inks it's not a solution for those wanting top quality photo printing.
Great for home snaps, but not yet anything for the more advanced market

Now, bring out a PRO-1/10/100 update (all ageing models) with refillable tanks, and that will definitely stir some interest...

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 21:33 UTC as 36th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: Interesting in that 'standards' could help cut through variations in assorted marketing 'emphasis' ;-)

However, given the longstanding recommendation to keep screen brightnesses well down if editing for print, I guess we should brace for the inevitable increase in "Why are my prints too dark" posts ;-)

I'm lucky enough to test high end printers for Canon and Epson and making great prints doesn't benefit from superbright monitors - wider gamuts than sRGB for sure. Print technologies massively expanding the dynamic range in print are not imminent

As a working photographer not using video, screens having such brightness capabilities are of minimal use (for now). That may change but as it stands I'm minded to regard the new standards as being more relevant to general PC users and gamers than photographers

My other lingering concern is that such standards make it easier to give spurious performance ratings to monitors that have no real relevance for many photographers.

All good points, but I should repeat that my comments were primarily aimed at 'normal' photographic editing and printing, where 120 cd/m2 would be bright, and as pointed out, the quality of black makes a more significant difference.

As yet (emphasis deliberate) HDR display has no place in my day to day work as a working photographer. When it does (and makes sense from a business POV) I'll be ready ;-)

As mentioned already, that's HDR for display, which is a very different thing to what is more commonly meant when people talk of HDR here on DPR. I am not planning to follow the tawdry side of the force just yet ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2018 at 14:07 UTC

Interesting in that 'standards' could help cut through variations in assorted marketing 'emphasis' ;-)

However, given the longstanding recommendation to keep screen brightnesses well down if editing for print, I guess we should brace for the inevitable increase in "Why are my prints too dark" posts ;-)

I'm lucky enough to test high end printers for Canon and Epson and making great prints doesn't benefit from superbright monitors - wider gamuts than sRGB for sure. Print technologies massively expanding the dynamic range in print are not imminent

As a working photographer not using video, screens having such brightness capabilities are of minimal use (for now). That may change but as it stands I'm minded to regard the new standards as being more relevant to general PC users and gamers than photographers

My other lingering concern is that such standards make it easier to give spurious performance ratings to monitors that have no real relevance for many photographers.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2018 at 20:27 UTC as 15th comment | 8 replies
On article Yongnuo announces YN 14mm F2.8 in Canon mount (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

whumber: The exterior is a clone but the optical design is completely distinct. Fairly sloppy journalism on DPReview's part.

Sorry DPR ... this -is- sloppy IMHO

If you are going to call it a clone, and disparage the product in the very title of the article, you should at least look at the optical formulae of their lenses.

I too thought "yet another clone" until I took the time to look at details for the EF14 2.8L and EF 14 2.8L II

I'll put it down to the time of the year ;-)
Happy Holidays as you say over there ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2017 at 16:55 UTC

Thanks for the insights and sharing this - one of the original inspirations for my own work (and decision to become a pro photographer)

I've run a site since 2003 (alongside my 'real' work as a photographer) and so much of the rise (and fall) you mention is oh so familiar ;-) Our peak was a bit later (2010-2011), but still there.

It's good to see that it's worked out in the longer term too.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2017 at 20:45 UTC as 54th comment
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: It's a very nice monitor - I've had one here for a month or so.

The 4k mode gives very fine UI elements on my Mac, so I use it in HiDPI (1920) mode for writing, which is very crisp and easy on the eye.

4k in PS gives print like detail (OK not quite, but I need my extra close-up glasses to check). Working on 4k images on a 27" does need attention to sharpening, but then any significant change of screen size needs that.

A friend of mine popped round with a 4k HDR Blu-Ray and Apple TV 4k - now that's impressive :-)

That's why I mentioned the HiDPI (1920) mode for more general use.

If I wanted 4k specifically I think I'd prefer the 32" SW320

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2017 at 16:47 UTC
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: It's a very nice monitor - I've had one here for a month or so.

The 4k mode gives very fine UI elements on my Mac, so I use it in HiDPI (1920) mode for writing, which is very crisp and easy on the eye.

4k in PS gives print like detail (OK not quite, but I need my extra close-up glasses to check). Working on 4k images on a 27" does need attention to sharpening, but then any significant change of screen size needs that.

A friend of mine popped round with a 4k HDR Blu-Ray and Apple TV 4k - now that's impressive :-)

I don't have Basiccolor to try, so only really tried an i1Display Pro with i1Profiler

In the end I used the benQ software, since it's the only one that makes full use of the hardware calibration. It also lets you set multiple calibrations.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2017 at 23:13 UTC

It's a very nice monitor - I've had one here for a month or so.

The 4k mode gives very fine UI elements on my Mac, so I use it in HiDPI (1920) mode for writing, which is very crisp and easy on the eye.

4k in PS gives print like detail (OK not quite, but I need my extra close-up glasses to check). Working on 4k images on a 27" does need attention to sharpening, but then any significant change of screen size needs that.

A friend of mine popped round with a 4k HDR Blu-Ray and Apple TV 4k - now that's impressive :-)

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2017 at 19:40 UTC as 27th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Keith Cooper: I've been testing it for a review update, and it adds useful functionality to the previous version.

RAW support is quite good, and covers most of the basics. Several things I looked at doing were not there, then I realised that they were perhaps best not done at the RAW stage. Lens corrections are a bit rudimentary.

The real power of the application comes with layers and masking abilities. At the moment it has relatively little support for printing, but I expect that's on their to-do list.

Add in the upcoming asset management and it could become a very useful package.

One aspect not widely covered is that it can use the previous Macphun plugins itself. This means that the custom presets I created (in Tonality) for B&W conversion can be used.

It's not going to surplant PS for my day to day 'paying work' any time soon but it's at a point where I'm suggesting it as an option for clients looking to do a bit more with some of their own images, who don't want to get on the Adobe train.

As an aside, I've also got the latest DxO Optics Pro to test, and the influence of the Nik purchase is already there with some nifty local adjustments.

Add to that Topaz Studio and Affinity, and I've quite a bit of editor testing to have a play with ;-)

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2017 at 16:50 UTC
In reply to:

Ben of the North: I bought it, i like the interface and all i need seems to be there. Anything but sending money to Adobe every month! So Luminar it will be from now on.

Quite a way from LR in this respect - no file management at all at the moment.

Different way of working to LR - no modules etc, In many ways with its layers, much more like PS, which is a major+ for me (never liked LR - YMMV)

Plugins - works with MacPhun ones at the moment.

Luminar can run as a plugin itself, so I use it from PS (CS6) - back to PS for any print activity.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2017 at 16:44 UTC

I've been testing it for a review update, and it adds useful functionality to the previous version.

RAW support is quite good, and covers most of the basics. Several things I looked at doing were not there, then I realised that they were perhaps best not done at the RAW stage. Lens corrections are a bit rudimentary.

The real power of the application comes with layers and masking abilities. At the moment it has relatively little support for printing, but I expect that's on their to-do list.

Add in the upcoming asset management and it could become a very useful package.

One aspect not widely covered is that it can use the previous Macphun plugins itself. This means that the custom presets I created (in Tonality) for B&W conversion can be used.

It's not going to surplant PS for my day to day 'paying work' any time soon but it's at a point where I'm suggesting it as an option for clients looking to do a bit more with some of their own images, who don't want to get on the Adobe train.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2017 at 16:38 UTC as 72nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Must buy lenses!

5x4 ? No thanks, I've no desire to use film whatsoever in a professional context.

As to the digital MF solution - the cost/returns vs profitability compared to what I'm using for architectural work make any claim to it being the 'only' solution somewhat fanciful at best.

The vagaries of running a -profitable- business in the market today (and I'm only talking about the UK here) makes the TS-E solution a very welcome one.

If you are lucky enough to have sufficiently well resourced clients to make the latest medium format stuff profitable, then good luck to you ;-)

I'll leave the plonking dismissal of the new lenses to others, I'll just get on working on a selection of TS-E24 and 17 images from a recent construction shoot...

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2017 at 13:48 UTC
In reply to:

Adamant: Can someone link to an example of medium-telephoto (135mm) tilt-shift architectural photography? I keep seeing people say these are useful for such things, but I am having a genuinely hard time envisioning it. I promise I'm not being combative here. I really don't think I can understand without an example or two.

I get why tilt-shift is useful for architectural work at shorter distances and I get why it would be useful for product/macro type work. But the medium-tele architectural stuff escapes me.

I agree that 17 and 24 are the key lenses for architecture/interiors

I've used an M645->EF shift adapter for some Mamiya MF lenses (35 and 55) for a few shots, but I use the 90 far more often for product type work (I also do location stuff in factories).

Where I have used the 90 and tilt for arch/interiors is where I want detail along a wall/floor/ceiling from an oblique angle - not often, but it's nice to know when something like this is possible.

The new lenses are an interesting prospect at the price - just not sure yet how big a hit the company bank account is going to take ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 19:56 UTC
In reply to:

wildbild: so funny to give shift lens specs wo shift and tilt movements..

all ±12mm
50 ±8.5º
90/135 ±10º

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 18:25 UTC
In reply to:

Edmond Leung: Must buy lenses!

"You can definitely go your entire life without ever using a TS lens, and you'd be fine."

Yes indeed, but learning to use a T/S lens has had a knock on effect/benefit on so many areas of my photography - I started with a second hand TS-E24 mk1

Not for everyone of course, but worth the effort if you get a chance...

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 18:10 UTC
Total: 60, showing: 1 – 20
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