liquidsquid

Lives in United States E Bloomfield, NY, United States
Works as a Analog Engineer
Joined on Dec 1, 2003

Comments

Total: 66, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Opinion: the Sony a7 III could be the new Nikon D750 (1228 comments in total)

Purple Banding? What are you talking about? Not a camera artifact that I can see.

The banding follows the face contours which likely means it is replicating the scene accurately. There is probably a screen or something with a pattern between the lights amd the subject like a screen, or more likely the shutter rate is such that you see the pulse-width modulation of the LEDs that selects LED colors being captured.

LEDs with color-changing are not on or dimmed, but switched completely on and off faster than your eye can see, but not faster than a camera can see. This could easily manifest in a banding pattern, and the evidence is in how contours are painted with it.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2018 at 14:55 UTC as 67th comment
On article Quick look: Canon's new compressed Raw format (242 comments in total)

Personally I would rather have my archive software deal with compression, or not. When it comes to burst shooting there could be obvious performance improvements since the bottleneck is usually flash write speeds. This would be the only really good reason to have it done in-camera IMHO, not for squeezing more shots on an SD card.

We will always search for and find some image that this compression will "destroy" and there will be a huge bashing thread to follow. Even if it is a bunch of bricks or a picture of a cat doing something cute. Even then it would need to be printed on a billboard to even have a hope of seeing the defect...

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2018 at 21:37 UTC as 9th comment
On article Video: Canon shows off its new 120MP APS-H CMOS sensor (217 comments in total)
In reply to:

SystemAgnostic: Let me get this straight: Canon can't master 4k, which is 8 million pixels, and they are releasing this press release type fluff for 120 million pixels?

Futhermore, the example screen shots only look about as good as 4k - and nothing like what I'd expect 120 million pixels to look like.

This doesn't make any sense to me.

You are likely seeing the limitation of the resolving power of the lens. The sensor resolution likely exceeds the resolving power of the lens and the focus accuracy.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2018 at 18:41 UTC
In reply to:

Tim Skrastins: So in a little over a year since this letter, manufacturers haven't come out with with this so it's being 'ignored'?

Seriously, what do you think the timeline is to engineer an entirely new feature, test it, make it work, maybe even adopt some common standards, etc. and come out with it?

It sounds like a cool feature but I think 'ignored' is pretty strong language. It's easy for someone on the sidelines to dream up an idea, even sketch it out, but engineering it and bringing it to market is an entirely different matter.

Software would be a "quick" implementation, but trying to encrypt images on the fly as pictures were taken would introduce a large penalty in performance. So to keep performance high and introduce encryption would in fact take quite some time to add to these highly specialized image processors in cameras.

Smartphone processors already have accelerators for these operations, so it is somewhat trivial to add the feature.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2018 at 19:03 UTC
On article Olympus 17mm F1.2 Pro sample gallery (409 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michiel953: Reading through the posts...

A 17mm will always be a 17mm, whatever the size of the image circle used behind it.

(Relatively) thin DoF (determined by distance to subject as much as aperture) is not the only contributing factor to achieve ‘separation’ or ‘pop’. The way the lens handles (micro) contrast also plays an important role.

That makes absolutely no sense.
It is like saying that the lens can artificially posterize an image.

I think what you really mean is how fogginess in the glass (impurities, etc.) can reduce the ability of a lens to go from one extreme of exposure to the other from one adjacent pixel to another. Absolutely perfect glass would pass a 255 to one pixel (if it were 8 bits) and 0 to the adjacent one. A slightly foggy lens would be 252 and 4, with a Gaussian distribution around the center highlight. A poor lens would be even less pixel to pixel contrast.

It is pixel-to-pixel rendering contrast ability.

Link | Posted on Dec 10, 2017 at 18:37 UTC

This is unlikely as people like to be able to remove their storage from a device in the event the device is out of battery or damaged.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 21:12 UTC as 63rd comment
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 first impressions (378 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ergo607: I don't know if it's me, but I have a hard time telling any supposed resolution upgrade on the 80MP high resolution mode...

@Ergo607 I understand now: a 20Mp lens + sensor shift will be able to resolve more information than a Bayer sensor alone due to the fact the Bayer array is information limited by nature since in a given space of a Bayer "Pixel". Only certain colors are resolved at a single location. Moving the sensor around allows a full RGB * 4 capture at each 20Mp site, rather than only a singe R,G,G, or B per site and interpolated up to 20Mp. The shift is essentially converting the Bayer to the Foveon on static images. That makes sense.

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2017 at 15:12 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 first impressions (378 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ergo607: I don't know if it's me, but I have a hard time telling any supposed resolution upgrade on the 80MP high resolution mode...

Wouldn't it also require a lens capable of the resolution you are trying to acquire? If the lens is soft, no sensor shift trickery in the world is going to gain more resolution. Finding the optimal aperture for sharpness for a particular lens will make a difference as well.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2017 at 16:30 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 first impressions (378 comments in total)
In reply to:

justmeMN: The body of the Panasonic G9 is bigger than a Canon SL2 DSLR.

http://camerasize.com/compare/#725,715

Now stick some equivalent walk-about quality zooms on each.
But yeah, definitely in the same size category of some more compact 'C' sensor sized cameras.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2017 at 16:26 UTC
In reply to:

liquidsquid: It is at the point now that most common display technologies cannot represent the image dynamics captured. The entire image pathway is great right up to the monitor or print medium, and then it is wasted (or limited). At that final point where it matters most, we have to compress the dynamic range for the limited display technologies and creatively present it to the observer. HDR monitors wont be hitting the mainstream anytime soon, and few print technologies can re-create the views (metallic is the best I have seen).
Sure is awesome to have this power and flexibility though. Wish I could justify owning one to get back into landscape photography, but I just can't do it. My Panasonic 4/3 is a small wart on the butt of this camera, especially for night shots. *sigh*.

I'm not talking 4K resolution, but the high-dynamic range content. I know projectors cannot do anything beyond what they have already done for years (not without some kind of variable iris gimmick which is scene by scene), so that only leaves flat panels with variable back-lights to do HDR, and even then, it is not at a per-pixel level. I have been running 4K+ for monitors at home and work for a few years, but not HDR content.

Link | Posted on Nov 10, 2017 at 15:03 UTC
In reply to:

liquidsquid: It is at the point now that most common display technologies cannot represent the image dynamics captured. The entire image pathway is great right up to the monitor or print medium, and then it is wasted (or limited). At that final point where it matters most, we have to compress the dynamic range for the limited display technologies and creatively present it to the observer. HDR monitors wont be hitting the mainstream anytime soon, and few print technologies can re-create the views (metallic is the best I have seen).
Sure is awesome to have this power and flexibility though. Wish I could justify owning one to get back into landscape photography, but I just can't do it. My Panasonic 4/3 is a small wart on the butt of this camera, especially for night shots. *sigh*.

I suppose that may be true, but I don't know anyone that has purchased one (I guess we are waiting for the old 1080p stuff to kick the bucket). Sure they are in the stores, and I am sure some people have them, but is there source material, or do you have to purchase a fancy camera or a new XBOX-X to make it work? Does the digital path actually function yet? I am suspicious that the technology isn't fully integrated yet.

Link | Posted on Nov 9, 2017 at 19:29 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix G9: What you need to know (243 comments in total)

Finally, an ideal upgrade path for my GH-2 that ticks off all of the boxes I care about.

Now I am curious what the RAW output from the sensor looks like for long night shots such as storm photography and possibly casual astronomy. Yes, I know I can get amazing results with larger sensors, but I cannot deal with taking large cameras around for casual fun hobby work. Should I expect the GH5 output to look the same, or will this look even better?

Link | Posted on Nov 9, 2017 at 19:22 UTC as 9th comment | 2 replies

It is at the point now that most common display technologies cannot represent the image dynamics captured. The entire image pathway is great right up to the monitor or print medium, and then it is wasted (or limited). At that final point where it matters most, we have to compress the dynamic range for the limited display technologies and creatively present it to the observer. HDR monitors wont be hitting the mainstream anytime soon, and few print technologies can re-create the views (metallic is the best I have seen).
Sure is awesome to have this power and flexibility though. Wish I could justify owning one to get back into landscape photography, but I just can't do it. My Panasonic 4/3 is a small wart on the butt of this camera, especially for night shots. *sigh*.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2017 at 12:34 UTC as 9th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: While the specs are great, probably 80% of people would never realize that power difference, or the 3TB of RAM. 48TB of storage might be a photographer's dream (for about 10-15 years maybe at least). But nobody (probably not even most CAD designers) would notice the difference between maybe 500GB and 3TB of RAM. I don't think there are any consumer-level programs that can utilize any more than perhaps 256GB of RAM at the moment that I can think of, except maybe if you're doing some REALLY SERIOUS video editing, like editing a full length 2 or 4 hour 4k video at the highest quality levels.

It is the multiple instances of said programs that wont thrash the drive, and the support of multiple desktop support that makes this interesting. Think of having everything loaded for multiple customers in Ram, and all you need to do is switch desktops for fast access.

For a hardware developer as myself, this is interesting on the level that creating FPGA images may occur fast enough to be useful now, among many other things. The price is right!

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2017 at 14:15 UTC
In reply to:

flip 21: another non-4k video crap, in almost 2018, from Canon... Maybe Canon should change their name to Crapon ;)

I simply don't get the fixation on 4K video. I have a 1080p 110" LCD projector that I am pretty darned certain I would only notice the jump to 4K when I first sat down to watch. After that, my brain would atrophy and not give a rat's patootie about fine details. In fact, I ran 4K video for a short while, but processing takes so long, that I went back to lower resolution just to speed things back up. Also, it is not like phones have gobs of storage space for 4K cat videos.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2017 at 20:39 UTC

Entertaining, but the thing that stands out to me: Would the common layman even notice? Only place we would see/pay attention to the difference is on a very large screen.
Yes, stark difference side-by-side, but really... $46K (and change) difference really doesn't buy a whole lot.
What would be more interesting is to understand what a latest micro 4/3 Panasonic can pull off vs. a Red. I think you would have a tough time telling them apart except for the bit depth tests.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2017 at 13:31 UTC as 63rd comment | 3 replies
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF bokeh demystified (355 comments in total)

Wow, if they gave the user the ability to swap that filter out with other styles, that would allow for some really creative tools.

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2017 at 16:14 UTC as 86th comment | 2 replies
On article Bang for the Buck: Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Review (719 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wedding photographer: Yesterday I bought an old Canon 5D body for 300$, I have 50 & 85mm lenses for it.
I'm reading about this new 4/3rd Olympus and can say that Olympus is better in every aspect than the old 5D, except photos.
Full Frame is amazing!!!

I had a very rude comment to make about cotton types and underpants, but instead I will just roll my eyes.

Really comparable with modern mobile phones? Really? There are tons of scenarios where 4/3 will lay the smack down on mobile phones, least of which is ease of manual control.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2015 at 20:24 UTC
In reply to:

Ribbit74: I know this must not be a new thing, but there's a huge difference in how Panasonic and Olympus JPG's handle the yellow colors (e.g. the yellow tubes of paint). Panasonic looks yellow-green. Olympus looks... yellow. RAW looks fine on both. Can the Panasonic JPG color shifts be tweaked?

In general it is shifted towards blue a bit. The yellows are "cold" by default. Yes, as in all Panasonic cameras you can tweak this. I go one step further and don't use in-camera processing any more as the color-cast was not to my liking. The old 16Mp sensor seemed a little IR sensitive, so us pasty northerners came out more red than expected or seen by the eye.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2015 at 21:01 UTC

Well, I was hoping for more in the high-ISO department, but this studio scene doesn't show me one important thing to me: Long exposure noise. Bulb-mode type stuff.

The reviews I have seen to date look very promising vs. the older 16Mp sensor.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2015 at 20:58 UTC as 36th comment | 1 reply
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