TN Args

TN Args

Lives in United States Fleurieu, South Pacific, United States
Works as a Economic infrastructure policy expert
Joined on Apr 10, 2010

Comments

Total: 639, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

milkod2001: Great specs , great price.

Now when can we expect D750 replacement, same specs 36MP $1000 less?

When did D700 get its replacement? There's your clue.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 10:30 UTC
In reply to:

Yxa: 1015g
No plastic build like the D7000 then

Maybe Nikon did their research on what percentage of their D800-series customers take them on all-day backpack hikes. You just read the spec sheet of the answer.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 10:25 UTC
In reply to:

beavertown: Thank you for Sony sensor.

Nikon sensor, sub-contracted to Sony to build. Unless you see this sensor on a 2-year-old Sony camera?

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 10:18 UTC
In reply to:

ecka84: Nice camera.
The mirror-phobic comrades must be jealous :D

I'm mirror-phobic, and I surely am jealous!

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 10:16 UTC
On article Nikon D850 First Impressions Review (170 comments in total)
In reply to:

stoffer: The lack of an electronic first curtain option is surprising and mildly concerning. Hopefully dpreview' first impressions of the redesigned shutter and mirror mechanism doing a good job keeping the vibrations in check will be enough.

@Zdman you have it all back-to-front about what causes shutter shock. In both DSLR OVF mode and mirrorless mechanical shutter mode, the shutter shock occurs when opens and hits the stops. That's why DSLR high-res cameras still suffer shutter shock even in mirror-up mode.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 09:55 UTC
On article Nikon D850 First Impressions Review (170 comments in total)
In reply to:

stoffer: The lack of an electronic first curtain option is surprising and mildly concerning. Hopefully dpreview' first impressions of the redesigned shutter and mirror mechanism doing a good job keeping the vibrations in check will be enough.

@Robbo338 and I think the article is mistaken to say that. Read the specs on Nikon's website. Clearly it has EFC shutter, and that term is meaningless in relation to full silent e-shutter, so it must refer to OVF mode.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 09:48 UTC
On article Nikon D850 First Impressions Review (170 comments in total)

@Richard Butler, it has EFC shutter in OVF mode. Specs say, "Electronically controlled vertical-travel focal-plane mechanical shutter. Electronic front-curtain shutter available in quiet shutter-release, quiet continuous shutter-release, and mirror up release modes."

Clearly this refers to OVF modes. The live view silent e-shutter does not use electronic *first* curtain, it is all-electronic.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 08:25 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon D850 First Impressions Review (170 comments in total)
In reply to:

stoffer: The lack of an electronic first curtain option is surprising and mildly concerning. Hopefully dpreview' first impressions of the redesigned shutter and mirror mechanism doing a good job keeping the vibrations in check will be enough.

Yes, it has EFC in OVF mode. It also has silent e-shutter in live view mode.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2017 at 08:14 UTC
In reply to:

Slapstick Noir: This test is irrelevant: too many variables. Different eyes, monitors, calibration, light environments, and - last but not least - expectations. And jpegs? Why?

The other problem with this guy's shootout is the AF test. He acknowledges that these are apples and an orange but then he puts them all to an apple test! Whaaaaaat?
Every camera has to be tested at it's best settings for the situation.
It's like dumbing down the test to the level of the less smart children so they can feel better! :)

Haha, you *so* didn't get the result you wanted! ;) And now you're going to lie about it.....

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 10:06 UTC
In reply to:

SickVodka: Blind Portraits?
You can clearly see which one is Nikon XD. To much green. Picked Nikon just once as Favorite.
Canon has more red and looks more saturated and Sony is more neutral overall.
Just use a Videoediting Software or in photoshop the RGB values and check out how the percentage of each color...

Hilarious to see you saying Nikon is green just a few minutes after @barrym1966 says Nikon is magenta.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 07:06 UTC

This camera JPEG comparison done last year also included an element of blind preference testing, and had clear winners and losers:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRQpueEvb-U

Unlike today's test, they tested more than just portrait scenes.

Again, I think the findings are valid, which is not to imply that they are unarguable.

It is an interesting topic. I am not totally comfortable with the idea that we can do today's test "to find out your own preference", because the personal preference of one individual can change more than one likes to admit, and quite quickly too. What I do think is more instructive is the overall population scores, and preferably not gear-head scoring which tends to involve double-guessing and fixations on IQ principles instead of pure and simple 'likes the look better'.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 07:02 UTC as 149th comment

Would be interesting to see if the scores by gear-heads, posted as comments here, are significantly different to the scores by general public viewing the same test. If so, it might be because the general public would be assessing the photos on pure attractiveness (a highly valid result), whereas the comments I have read are often valuing what they are guessing to be neutrality (invalid because they don't have a reference) or even worse getting their ego involved and trying to double guess what camera took what photo (invalid approach to the test and its objective).

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 04:29 UTC as 175th comment
In reply to:

melgross: So from what the technical editor is saying, jpegs, which never give the best quality, are better because they don’t allow the fine adjustments that RAW processing allows, because you may not be able to duplicate that jpeg using RAW.

That’s just nuts! All of a sudden, any respect I had for that guy went out the window.

I ran a fairly large commercial photo lab in NYC for a long time. We were one of the very first to go digital, and I began my career back in 1969 in fashion and advertising, when I was 19. So I’ve seen a lot of work over the decades.

Anybody that thinks that way is crippled in their understanding of how commercial, color processing works. And if we’re talking about the highest quality, not just the quick reaction wanted here, which is the worst way to evaluate pictures, jpegs are almost never used, for good reasons.

@melgross I think you have misrepresented the technical editor. Try to avoid that, it makes you look bad.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 01:16 UTC
In reply to:

wareyes: Sony-26
Canon-26
Nikon-20

And I'm a Nikon guy...

Ultimately, this was a fun game, people shouldn't take it so seriously. As others have said, jpegs kind of doomed this test. All 3 cameras are more than capable.

Why should shooting JPEG doom the test if (a) he correctly set the WB to match the lighting, and (b) raw engines typically emulate the camera engine, but with less than complete success?

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 00:46 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: This test is for SOOC jpg's, correct? For sports shooters this is a big deal, for studio shooters who do everything in RAW, the variance in color is almost a non-issue (though of course we'd love to have things as close to what we see as possible).

Read the last half of the article -- it suggests you have misjudged raw

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2017 at 00:39 UTC
In reply to:

minababe: If anyone wants to really learn composition, I urge you all to look at Baroque art. This genre used exaggerated methods of composition to such an extent that if you study any painting long enough, you'll start to pick up some things right away as a photographer.

For example: line of sight. In a seemingly chaotic composition of many objects and groups of people, painters would have all the figures looking more or less in the same direction or at the same thing.

Another example: parallel diagonals. Take a look at this painting: https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-1RewcCMlYbk/UGxOIDc2LHI/AAAAAAABIkE/elWkpbLEdDc/s1600/Gerard+Terborch+(Dutch+Baroque+Era+Painter,+1617-1681)+The+Dancing+Couple.jpg. Note that the angle that the man is leaning at is exactly parallel with the angle of the woman's outstretched left arm. The guy's left leg is exactly parallel with the woman's right arm.

This doesn't even begin to cover composition, but like I said, study Baroque and you'll start to pick things up.

The woman's outstretched left arm has two angles.

Link | Posted on Aug 22, 2017 at 11:26 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: So ... I was wondering about the name "dynamic symmetry" as I have never heard about it before. So - I found that this seems to be something special for IPOX Studios, something they use in their teaching (that you pay for). It does not seem to be anything generally used. A guy, named Jay Hambridge, invented some strangeness he also called dynamic symmetries maybe 100 years ago. Something based on a kind of Fibonacci series, starting with 118 and 191, instead of 1 and 2. Seems to be even more BS than this one.

So, after some thinking, I think I agree with the majority in this thread. This is not serious.

And just so you know. 1. There is nothing dynamic with this grid, rather the opposite, static. 2. I saw no symmetries in his examples. So - whatever IPOX Studios got this name from, it is probably marketing BS.

I too have never heard of it

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2017 at 10:31 UTC

Is "unofficial port" just another way of saying "illegal software hack"? And, if it is an illegal activity, why are you promoting it?

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 22:08 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies

Surface problems are all superficial. Apple problems go to the core.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2017 at 21:43 UTC as 38th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

dash2k8: I think if the performers themselves requested that no pictures be taken, then it's just a simple matter of respect of another person(s)'s wishes of privacy, isn't it? Just because they performed in a public park doesn't mean they themselves are public property. Only if they signed some sort of "allow others to take pictures" release are they bound to let others aim their lenses at them.

This isn't about being nice, this is about *force*. And the local authority started it. What you personally like or don't like other people doing harmlessly in the same park as you are walking your dog is your own contrary personality, and nothing to do with it frankly.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2017 at 02:21 UTC
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