graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 1157, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

BobT3218: Buy Adobe shares for your grandchildren! What happens when a cloud services user dies? We all die. Payments stop. The executor is unlikely to know which services were used and even less likely to know the user name or password. Who owns the images? Possession is 9/10 of the law as they say. In time, Adobe or its successor will be sitting on a gold mine of archival professional quality images which deceased cloud services users have inadvertently left them and payed Adobe for the privilege.

It's a very important thought, no matter which software or service you use. You must leave instructions about how your survivors can access every online account containing your life's work, especially if valuable family photos are in the mix.

At least with Lightroom CC, after you stop paying, you have a year to download your photos for free, and there's a free LR cloud download utility to bring them all back in one batch. Descendents should be told that they do not have to pay to retrieve photos from a dead relative with an unpaid account, but you need to tell them how to get into the account.

The above post also will not apply to people like me who don't store very much work in the Adobe cloud to start with, even though I use the applications. I still store and back up to local and off site drives.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2018 at 00:26 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: adobe make very useful , but poorly coded software , they have virtually ignored the move to multiple cores that cpus have made in the past years .... tht they continue to ignore optimising their code and are so slow even on cutting edge machines tell me all i need about this company

its why idont use their software any more , that and the subscrition based model

cosinaphile, the links you posted were accurate until the last two updates which many have benchmarked as demonstrably faster. Your links are now old. Here are some current links.

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Lightroom-Classic-CC-Version-7-2-Performance-1110/

https://photographylife.com/lightroom-6-vs-cc-7-1-vs-7-2-performance-comparison

What you did was like claiming that Ronald Reagan is President, because you posted links saying he was. True, but outdated and not accounting for current facts.

This isn't necessarily a defense, it took competition to wake them up and make them work. But now they're working at it.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2018 at 23:35 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Zeee: Never heard of this guy in my life but some of the things he says in the article are just bizarre to someone my age. I'm guessing it's a generational thing though, to me and many of my friends/people my age that I know, the idea of "The heat of the gazes between people, the charged mystery that arises from capturing chance moments on the fly" is honestly creepy. To each their own though

Well, that's exactly the problem: If you're not interested in this genre and yet you comment on it, it's like some music snob looks through your records and decides your stuff is terrible.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 22:06 UTC

What's fascinating is the intersection of "people who looked at the awful sample photos" and "people who decided to risk their money"

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 21:49 UTC as 88th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Alex Zeee: Never heard of this guy in my life but some of the things he says in the article are just bizarre to someone my age. I'm guessing it's a generational thing though, to me and many of my friends/people my age that I know, the idea of "The heat of the gazes between people, the charged mystery that arises from capturing chance moments on the fly" is honestly creepy. To each their own though

The main difference between this guy and Joel Meyerowitz is that I have long heard of, and really admire, the work of Joel Meyerowitz.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 21:47 UTC
In reply to:

JRM PT: I am very curious about this tablets but I'm afraid that I find it a little too weird to look at the screen and use a pen on a black sheet... maybe it's just a question of trying. Need to improve my editing skills first though.

@Class A, I can agree with what you said, given your applications. I do not think a tablet is very useful with Lightroom or Capture One. They don't really take advantage of it. A Shuttle Pro would be good with those applications.

But if we were talking about digital painting or photo retouching in Photoshop or similar, where subtle brushwork can actually be done, a tablet has real value there.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2018 at 01:30 UTC
In reply to:

yaxexa: They removed the Multi-touch gesture! :/

They didn't remove it. It never existed for the current Intous line. Multi-touch is part of the Intous PRO line. This mid-grade Intous is not a replacement for that.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 18:08 UTC
In reply to:

JRM PT: I am very curious about this tablets but I'm afraid that I find it a little too weird to look at the screen and use a pen on a black sheet... maybe it's just a question of trying. Need to improve my editing skills first though.

Class A, I wonder if you actually spent any significant time using one.

Keyboard shortcuts - thousands of artists use one hand on styles, other hand on keyboard for shortcuts. I do it that way too. It's no problem. Stylus is easier to keep in hand than a mouse if the other hand needs to go over the keyboard.

Pressure sensitivity - again, it works for thousands. If you don't like it or can't manage to make it work for yourself, that's one thing, but it really does work. The other features work fine too (tilt angle etc.)

Crossing the screen - you do NOT have to move your whole arm. Only if you use a big tablet! I use a smaller Wacom and I only have to move maybe my whole wrist. You can also program the shortcut keys on the tablet to jump to screen locations or switch between multiple monitors.

Tablets are too useful and too much more capable than mice to be dismissed. It sounds like you never mastered it. I bought my first Wacom in the 90s and never stopped...I like it too much!

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 18:07 UTC
In reply to:

Michael Soppa: I know its kinda expensive but would it be possible to use one of those new iPad Pro tablets together with a Apple Pencil as a tablet?

Yes, there are several apps that will allow you to do that. The top competitors are Astropad and Duet Pro. You install the companion apps on the Mac side and the iPad, the Mac app sends the screen image to the iPad, and you manipulate it with the Apple Pencil.

There are more apps that do this, but they are not as good and do not take full advantage of the Apple Pencil. Astropad and Duet are the best ones.

Obviously it would be a dumb idea to spend $1000 on an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil just to do this, but it's a great idea if you already own that hardware. If you don't already have the hardware then you should also be looking at a Wacom Cintiq which also puts the computer image on the tablet screen. so you can paint directly on the image with the stylus.

While you can paint on the tablet itself with apps like ProCreate, if you need to use real Photoshop or other desktop apps that would be the motivation to use a tablet as a peripheral to a computer.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 18:01 UTC
In reply to:

AshMills: Was having a wire really causing problems?

The wire isn't much of a problem on my desktop, but it can be. If you pick up the tablet and move it around the desk or down to your lap to draw on it, the wire can snag or get in the way.

When throwing the tablet in a bag and taking it to a location with a laptop, the wire can be awkward to work around on a small cafe table, and the more compact notebooks have fewer USB ports, so it's nice to not have to plug it into anything, so it can float untethered like a real paper tablet.

After traveling with a Bluetooth mouse for years and never wanting to go back to a wired mouse, the advantage of not needing a wire for the tablet is blindingly obvious. I'd definitely pay the extra $20 for Bluetooth.

The smaller footprint is good too. I've used the Intous Pro line for many years, but those waste a lot of space around the actual active tablet area. A more minimal bezel helps fit the thing on the table.

My Wacom is over 10 years old but improvements like these might make me finally upgrade.

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2018 at 21:13 UTC
In reply to:

DiffractionLtd: Looks like it came from some Kickstarter scheme. Or they had some scraps of left-over gear. Why is it stuff that wouldn't merit being in the old 1970's Spiratone catalog is worth the time?

@PaloAltoMark - aside from not needing "printer" drivers for a scanner (yeah, I know what you meant :) ), as long as the 4870 hardware is working, you should be able to use it. I have a much older Epson 1600 series flatbed and it still works on the latest macOS.

The key is to realize you are not limited to using Epson scanner drivers. I can run my old Epson using either Apple Image Capture which comes with the computer, or VueScan which is constantly updated and, to my knowledge, never un-supports any of the hundreds of scanners it can run. The Silverfast pro scanning application also supports the 4870.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 17:50 UTC
In reply to:

sop51: A side-by-side comparison of the same negative/transparency photographed with the ES-2/D850/60mm, then scanned with a Nikon Coolscan would be very interesting.

As a Coolscan owner I would be very interested in that comparison. While the Coolscan was a great scanner in its day, I wonder if the D850's cutting-edge sensor would produce better results today.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2018 at 17:45 UTC
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: "...reward millions of like-minded creatives for their high-quality work." Reward? How so?

The linked 500px post says "we will be announcing new partnerships that will give your photos an even greater reach, and new markets in which to sell..."

We'll see what really happens, but being acquired by a stock agency means they need to support the contributing photographers. Of course, if they really are the "Getty Images of China," that could mean we have to watch out for one-sided deals where they keep most profits.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2018 at 23:21 UTC
In reply to:

Osa25: “....Still, we've not seen such aggressive corner cutting unit cost optimization since Sony's a3000 (which was seemingly made from upcycled yogurt containers),...”

Well yes you have. It was called the iPhone SE and that is the role model being copied by this industry here. But would be nice to see such bold words in an iPhone review.

The iPhone SE is nothing to be ashamed of. I am proud of mine.

Both of us in our household, and multiple friends and neighbors own SEs...we prefer iOS, but we have no need for the biggest screen or the latest features that cost $1000 to acquire, we just need a competent compact smartphone.

As a photographer, what's nice is the iPhone SE, even though it's the bottom of the line, meets the minimum requirements for shooting raw images.

Sure, the SE doesn't have Force Touch and a few other things, but who really cares? The "corners" Apple cut on the SE were not anything essential. They only cut the frilly extras we didn't need to pay extra for. We're very happy with what it is.

We're glad that companies can use sunk costs on older components to offer lower-cost alternatives in the current line, instead of only offering high-margin luxury items.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2018 at 23:14 UTC
In reply to:

kevin_r: So what happens when the "ceiling" is a non-horizontally slanted cover like in a tent? Does the calculations take that angle into account or does it assume a flat horizontal surface only? Would be interesting to know.

Since it does do a pre-flash, it probably doesn't need to know the exact angle because if the angle is not optimal for a good bounce, the pre-flash return data will tell the flash whether it needs more power or whether it won't have the power to make it work.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2018 at 05:48 UTC
In reply to:

DotCom Editor: Remember, SSD's have a finite lifecycle expressed in read/write operations.

You should have read further down first. The bigger the SSD, the longer it lasts: Since there is usually so much unused space, you don't have to rewrite cells as often. And this is a really big SSD.

In addition, even the current crop of consumer-grade SSDs has been torture-tested to death, and it was found that they will all last well beyond the point where you would have upgraded to a newer/bigger one.

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/03/consumer-ssds-benchmarked-to-death-and-last-far-longer-than-rated/

SSD read/write lifetime is simply not an issue for most users today. Especially when you compare SSD reliability to hard drives. Raising concerns about SSD read/write without talking about whether that's worse than the reliability of the alternative device (mechanical hard drives) is operating a false equivalency.

Link | Posted on Feb 20, 2018 at 18:40 UTC
On article Apple iPhone X review (380 comments in total)
In reply to:

ttran88: Will you update this review when Apple decides to throttle the phones performance in the future?

It wasn't phone throttling so much as battery life extending. Many more users need longer battery life than they need the phone CPU to be pegged.

The fact is that Apple is "throttling" (battery extending) the iPhone X today, since it's the OS that does it (Apple is soon adding an option for you to control it). So you should be satisfied...because this review score was already given with that behavior in place.

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2018 at 00:38 UTC
In reply to:

tinternaut: Hmmm... Whatever the price, I’m betting it will be an awful lot of money to spend and discover I’m still crap at shooting sports.

Yeah...instead of taking one perfectly composed, perfectly timed, but slightly misfocused frame of a fast-moving player, now I'll have taken 11,000 slightly misfocused frames of a fast-moving player. :(

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2018 at 00:22 UTC
In reply to:

Azimuth46: It seems to me that Windows gains significant more performance than Mac in this upcoming release.

Most importantly Adobe and also DPR are concentrated on import/export times but it's not there where we must concentrate on. I know it's much easier to test import and/or export but the bottleneck is in reviewing images in Library module when you go as fast as possibile from one image to another, even with two screens (one dedicated to have the image in full screen) and you have the "Loading..." or you have the pixellating images because they are still loading!

You have to do the same in Develop Module where LR is supposed to use GPU (which one is enough when a 1080Ti isn't!), or when you are comparing images still in Dev Module. And so forth. These are the tests that count! Especially if you are working with a UHD monitor, which is more common nowadays.

Azimuth46 said "It seems to me that Windows gains significant more performance than Mac in this upcoming release."

This was at least partially explained in the story. Windows will, from a relative standpoint, appear to have more gains in this version, but it's because there has been a well known bug in the existing version where Windows Lightroom got slower and slower over time, a bug that was not on the Mac. From an absolute standpoint, it means Windows LR was hobbled before and now reaching performance parity with Mac.

Esco said " 64bit adobe software was a year or two behind PC during the CS series"

Maybe true during the CS series, but actually, one of the frustrating things about using Aperture, was that even though Aperture was Apple's own application, Lightroom came out with a 64-bit Mac version before Aperture did.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2018 at 00:07 UTC
In reply to:

barrym1966: Will this be released for a proper operating system?

@davesurrey I did say "Granted, it's from the same sources" and that I'm open to seeing others. Got any?

And you're right, none of these numbers will sway the developers, even if we throw in Google Play, because they may not care what the overall numbers are. It is very possible that what they look at are the revenue shares for *photographers* on mobile, and if it turns out that photographers spend disproportionately more on iOS than the general population, photo app developers will lean that way.

Link | Posted on Jan 27, 2018 at 21:28 UTC
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