graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 986, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

princecody: When will Apple Camera Raw be available?

I think he means the Apple Digital Camera Compatibility Updates for raw support in macOS. Which usually lags behind Adobe in adding new cameras.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2017 at 01:37 UTC
In reply to:

Ray12666: What ever happened to having a camera (film or digital) that did nothing but allow us to set aperature, speed and ISO, in other words why do we need so many bells and whistles on our digital cameras? I like to shoot mostly Aperature preferred, set my own ISO, my own focus area and just shoot, I don't even own adobe photoshop or lightroom, who needs it? Is it me or are we just forgetting that the job and pleasure is to compose the photo and get the right exposure without all the bells and post processing? BTW, I did like the new canon wide angle and the pictures were marvelous. OK, don't hit me too hard and I know I cannot spell aperature. I am using an Olympus OMD EM-1 with a 12-40 pro lens, am considering if I need a prime, albeit most of my shoots are during travel.

"I don't do post" means nothing more than "Most of the creative decisions of my alleged art are outsourced to (for analog) the lab who processes and prints my film, (for digital) the camera firmware programmers, and the programmers of my software's default settings."

For digital, "I don't do post" means "My art is 100% controlled by decisions by the technicians at Sony, Adobe, and Epson who I've never met...but I like to take all the credit as an artist."

Link | Posted on May 17, 2017 at 23:01 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: It is also interesting that one could smoke a pipe or cigar at work back then.
I recall a photo from the Indianapolis 500 where a man was cleaning the windscreen during a pit stop while smoking a stogie. No concern about starting a fire with all that fuel nearby. Today pit crews where Nomex suits and helmets.

I'm curious what generation HeyItsJoel is a member of. Because every generation since the 1960s (ungrateful hippie protesters) has been complained about as the Absolute Death of Civilization This Time for Real.

Misguided baby boom Hippies wasting their lives on drugs instead of joining the Army, later turned into the 1980s materialistic Yuppies, you have the lazy Gen X slackers, the Millennials...shouldn't we already be living in caves by now?

Link | Posted on May 12, 2017 at 23:29 UTC
On article Polaroid sold to new owner (93 comments in total)

For once it's nice to see an old brand transferred to a company (Impossible Project) that actually does work in the field associated with the classic name (instant film photography), instead of just being another "brand value" in a portfolio of venture capitalists placing orders for dollar-store quality toys from Chinese factories.

I wish them the best.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2017 at 23:21 UTC as 19th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

graybalanced: The lack of color is not necessarily a problem. You could use this camera to produce the most detailed color photographs ever made by just picking up three color filters, and combining three exposures with some simple post processing. That wouldn't intimidate anyone in a position to acquire this thing.

@electrophori I'm sure there would be a way. Inter-frame ghosting is a problem being heavily worked on by every company that processes HDR or panoramas, including everyone from Canon to Adobe to Panasonic to Google to Apple. The better their algorithms get, the less we have to retouch.

Oh, and NASA. It has for decades very common for space probes and Mars landers to carry this type of camera: A monochrome sensor with color filter array. Scientists can filter for the specific wavelengths they need for their spectral analyses, with the side benefit of photographing alien worlds in color with more detail for less megapixels, with no Bayer pattern to deal with.

With this camera you don't have to use fewer megapixels, and you still get to avoid the Bayer pattern failings, and you can use color filter techniques that are not new to someone like NASA or scientists, merging them with anti-ghosting algorithms that absolutely everybody is helping to push forward already.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2017 at 19:41 UTC
In reply to:

AlanG: It is also interesting that one could smoke a pipe or cigar at work back then.
I recall a photo from the Indianapolis 500 where a man was cleaning the windscreen during a pit stop while smoking a stogie. No concern about starting a fire with all that fuel nearby. Today pit crews where Nomex suits and helmets.

@HeyItsJoell this hasn't the slightest bit to do with any generation. It doesn't account for pre-millennials doing stupid things like smoking around fuel vapors. Maybe you're just arguing that earlier generations were less smart?

Anyway, the real reason people are overly cautious today isn't [whatever generation comes after yours]. It's because of insurance companies and lawyers. I'm pretty sure that's the answer you would get in the auto racing and industrial safety examples.

It sounds like you're putting down the current 20-something generation just like every generation of middle-aged folks has since the Greeks at least.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2017 at 19:30 UTC
In reply to:

cgarrard: Why would you default process all of your files? :)

Not sure if the smiley at the end means sarcasm in this case, but in case it doesn't...

...you're ALWAYS default processing your files. It's only a question of whether your style starts with the camera's defaults, Adobe's defaults, or your own. This way, you can have your own.

And it's great because you can make different defaults for cameras etc. You can set it so that all your ISO 100 photos get default Noise Reduction of 10 while your ISO 3200 images get default Noise Reduction of 40.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2017 at 19:27 UTC
In reply to:

Ray12666: What ever happened to having a camera (film or digital) that did nothing but allow us to set aperature, speed and ISO, in other words why do we need so many bells and whistles on our digital cameras? I like to shoot mostly Aperature preferred, set my own ISO, my own focus area and just shoot, I don't even own adobe photoshop or lightroom, who needs it? Is it me or are we just forgetting that the job and pleasure is to compose the photo and get the right exposure without all the bells and post processing? BTW, I did like the new canon wide angle and the pictures were marvelous. OK, don't hit me too hard and I know I cannot spell aperature. I am using an Olympus OMD EM-1 with a 12-40 pro lens, am considering if I need a prime, albeit most of my shoots are during travel.

What happened were feature wars. Every company's marketing department needs a feature list that can go to war with every other comparable camera in the market. This started before digital, got worse when cameras became consumer items, when SLRs became step-up cameras for people who wanted something better than a full auto P&S.

Also every photographer has their own favorite bell or whistle. If you took it away, they would complain angrily. It's different for every one, so they just leave them all in. It wasn't so bad when cameras were mechanical, but as with software feature creep when cameras went electronic it became easier to jam more features into the same little box. And marketing loved that so much, they asked for more features.

You know the beauty of cameras today is you can still shoot the way you want. Don't worry about the bells and whistles, just set the three things you want and go, ignore the rest.

Personally I like having choices like mechanical vs e-shutter, etc.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2017 at 00:09 UTC

The lack of color is not necessarily a problem. You could use this camera to produce the most detailed color photographs ever made by just picking up three color filters, and combining three exposures with some simple post processing. That wouldn't intimidate anyone in a position to acquire this thing.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 23:27 UTC as 18th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

absquatulate: Aaaaaand.......you still need a tripod...so why bother with a mobile phone in the first place?

Let's keep some perspective here. A 50 cent tripod may be 100x worse than a $100 tripod, but for long exposure night shots, the 50 cent tripod is still 1000x better than no tripod at all...

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 23:22 UTC
In reply to:

Mato34: I use to do stacking with Photoshop from bursts on my Nikons 1, and it tooks quite a time (about 10 minutes) the whole process on my PC. I'm not sure about being a realistic automated process with a smartphone CPU.

It is nothing new. Multiple apps have done stacking for some time, especially the ones doing in-camera HDR, which is part of the default camera in many phones now. The raw HDR stacking in the Lightroom Mobile app does take much longer than snapping a regular photo, it has to process in the background. But the camera CPU can handle it. Don't forget that the integrated CPU/GPU combos in today's top of the line smartphones/tablets are surprisingly powerful compared to low end laptops.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 23:53 UTC
In reply to:

absquatulate: Aaaaaand.......you still need a tripod...so why bother with a mobile phone in the first place?

Fake problem. I picked up a $10 phone tripod and phone clamp. The tripod part collapses into a cylinder the size of a skinny pocket-sized flashlight.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 23:49 UTC
In reply to:

PTAX52: great image,but when you combine 50 or more to make a single image, do we cross the line as photographers and become CGI makers. does it change what photography was to people my age. ( 60 )

You know, back when you were a kid, people asked "Great image, but do we cross the line as artists and become mere technicians when the image is produced by plastic film, metal buttons and dials, and beakers full of chemicals?"

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 23:45 UTC
On article Dell announces 4K HDR10 monitor (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

CaPi: Interesting price point.. my first thought was "Where does the money go? Is there a PC somewhere hidden in it?"

@Clint Dunn Whether either of those monitors is "overpriced" depends on how closely they meet the specs they claim along with having the proper uniformity etc. If the LG doesn't meet its specs and the Dell does, their prices are justified. If the Dell doesn't meet its specs but the LG does, then the LG is fairly priced and the Dell is not.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 23:17 UTC
On article Dell announces 4K HDR10 monitor (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

ecka84: So, after you edit an image using this new amazing monitor and make it incredibly realistic HDR and stuff, how would it look like on a normal screen for the rest 99.99% of the world?

No need for unnecessary alarmism. This is only a mystery to photographers who have never dealt with anything but one printer and the web.

Nothing has changed, you master to the ideal medium and you make sure it looks OK across a range of mediocre mediums. Just like you do now when making a master image for print that also looks good on your web site and on the non-calibrated screens of the public.

Music and video/film pros usually have more experience with this. Music pros know you master on your high-end, unaffordable studio monitors but you check that it sounds acceptable on phone earbuds and car stereos. Video/film pros have always known that a movie gets one color grade edit for a theater projector, a different grade for the home TV blu-ray, etc. They're not so locked into one ideal that's supposed to look perfect on everything (not possible).

It sounds like the mindset of us photographers have some catching up to do here in the approach to production, compared to other media.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2017 at 22:02 UTC
On article Dell announces 4K HDR10 monitor (88 comments in total)
In reply to:

CaPi: Interesting price point.. my first thought was "Where does the money go? Is there a PC somewhere hidden in it?"

It's not an outrageous price point if you're paying attention to what it is. The pro grade NEC and Eizo monitors, wide gamut and exceedingly precise, and standard in many studios, are in the $1000-3000 bracket, and they don't all have 4K, HDR10, and HDR10-capable peak brightness. This one does, so of course it can cost that much and more.

That doesn't mean we should all run out and buy it. If we wait a little while, it will drop down to the around $1000 range in short order like the 4K 8-bit sRGB monitors already have.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2017 at 21:57 UTC
In reply to:

tkbslc: Why does it seem like only Apple based computer hardware makes it to the news feed?

The only way this gear is "Apple-based" is if being a fanboy or hater blinds you to the fact that Thunderbolt 3 is driving many new Windows PC laptop performance solutions including external GPUs.

The words "Apple" and "Mac" cannot be found appear anywhere in the news story or LaCie's quoted press release.

This reminds me of the many Internet commenters who have complained about the "proprietary Apple" Thunderbolt connection, even though it's actually an Intel technology...

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 23:39 UTC
In reply to:

photowurks: Why isn't Nikon making this kind of material!?!?

Because Nikon already got eclipsed by Fuji.
https://www.dpreview.com/news/1896381164/sony-is-now-2-in-the-us-full-frame-interchangeable-lens-camera-market

Canon's telling us to get ready, they're going to be eclipsed next...

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 23:17 UTC
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: I'd take a 5DsR + 16-35mill. Make huge prints.

(A d810/a7r would do great too but one likes that 5D body/controls)

You have some gorgeous places to take pictures of, we're so unlucky out here in Egypt... Sun, desert, No colour.

"Sometimes it's hard to see past the familiar." Too true. I knew a guy who moved up north from the American Southwest. On the relatively few days the sun comes out up here, everyone looks for an excuse to skip work and go outside, but he would be the only person in the city who would prefer to stay inside. The unending days of hot sun he grew up with left him with the ingrained idea that being out in the sun was everyday, uncomfortably hot, and boring...

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 00:23 UTC

Although I have moved on to an LX7, my LX3 is still in use around our household. The LX3 was a great travel camera despite the short zoom, and a great camera to sneak into a concert thanks to the fast lens, if you can get close to the stage. For the better part of the last decade, the LX series has lived in my daily commuter bag and when I can't bring a bag it goes in my jacket, and I've got a lot of great shots because of that pocket-sized take-anywhere portability. My smartphone can't match the larger sensor, and doesn't zoom either.

One of the biggest things that held back pocket cameras before were the slow, mediocre lenses. If nothing else, we have to at least thank Panasonic for changing that with the fast Leica glass they put into the LX series.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2017 at 23:36 UTC as 43rd comment | 3 replies
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