graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 1099, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

MPS Photographic: I have 40,000 images filling 392GB in HD space. Do I have any options in the new Lightroom to disable Cloud uploading of my images?

I was only talking about the photos, not the edits. I 100% agree with you that the edits can't be migrated, but like I said, it's the same problem no matter which program you switch to. I don't think any brand of editor's raw adjustments is transferable to any other. It's going to be the same problem no matter which alternative is chosen. My hope is that whatever program I choose will continue to be developed affordably until I live out my natural life, because if not, it's the same situation all over again with another program.

Link | Posted on Nov 22, 2017 at 00:53 UTC
In reply to:

ozturert: 8K is coming because companies saw that they cannot increase sales with 4K :) "More, more, more" strategy...

8K doesn't even need 360 to be useful. There are cameras right now that act as a single 4K camera pointed at for example, a talk show panel, but you can crop different 2K feeds out of that one 4K view. For instance, one view of the entire set, one view of just the host, one of just a guest. An 8K camera doing the same job would have more flexibility in being able to pull multiple full resolution 4K and 2K frames out of a wide 8K view.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2017 at 08:14 UTC
In reply to:

MPS Photographic: I have 40,000 images filling 392GB in HD space. Do I have any options in the new Lightroom to disable Cloud uploading of my images?

I keep hearing that "it won't be around forever" but you could say that about any program. Aperture and Picasa are already gone for good. Nik barely survived being killed.

In the long run this isn't about just Adobe. You always have to set up your photos so they can always be migrated no matter what happens to your desktop or cloud editor.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 00:56 UTC
On article DJI Spark Review: Small but mighty (125 comments in total)
In reply to:

raztec: I can't understand why the Drone manufacturers, instead of including their own camera, which too often has a very small sensor, don't just make a drone that has the ability to carry any small, compact point & shoot or action cam in a cargo bay. That way we can use our own cameras and get much better quality photos and they can reduce the costs and complexity of the drone.

By carrying its own camera, the specs (mass, size, performance) are well known and reduce the development cost. While I think it would be nicer for drones to carry any camera, it would drastically increase testing costs and the engineering to accommodate a range of cameras. The final cost and complexity might be more than if they can simply include a camera where they have complete knowledge of its specs and needs and do not have to safely accommodate anything else. It might also make it difficult to achieve the "throw it in a bag" size of this drone if a robust external mounting platform is part of it.

Bigger drones, with bigger budgets, can carry a third party camera.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 00:21 UTC
In reply to:

ozturert: 8K is coming because companies saw that they cannot increase sales with 4K :) "More, more, more" strategy...

That's the usual knee-jerk response, and understandable since there aren't any 8K TVs at Costco.

But in reality, the emergence of 360 degree video means 2K and even 4K are no longer enough of a capture size. Even if a 2K/4K frame is the final destination, 360 capture and the resulting AR/VR mastering are probably some of the "killer apps" of 8K capture/edit.

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2017 at 00:19 UTC
In reply to:

MPS Photographic: I have 40,000 images filling 392GB in HD space. Do I have any options in the new Lightroom to disable Cloud uploading of my images?

The cloud is not mandatory in the latest versions.

Lightroom Classic - to avoid cloud, just don't enable it. Non-cloud is the default.

Lightroom CC - while the default is uploading your imports to the cloud, you can disable uploading in the preferences and now it will be all local. But if you don't want any uploading ever, use Classic, not CC.

Link | Posted on Nov 16, 2017 at 00:22 UTC
In reply to:

fillkay: There seem to be so many of us looking around for LR 6 replacements, wouldn't it be a good idea for DPR to run a proper comparison test of all the available alternatives?

I'm as cynical as anybody, but I think DPReview makes an effort to not be a simple sales platform. They have recently posted negative opinion articles about the current direction of high volume sellers Canon, Adobe, and maybe another I can't remember. This week they posted a "gear of the year" pick (Leica M10) that their Amazon corporate owners don't even sell directly, you can only get one or two from "other sellers" and Amazon does not even fulfill those orders. Why wouldn't they pick a nice mass-market camera that Amazon can sell a million of?

(I went to B&H Photo's website and found that they are an actual "authorized reseller" of Leica gear. Amazon is apparently not.)

Link | Posted on Nov 12, 2017 at 00:57 UTC
In reply to:

Scottelly: Someone should be fired for that name. A name like that makes me wonder how creative the programmers can possibly be. I think I'll stay away from this crapware until they can come up with a decent name for it. At least then they'll give me a little reassurance that their software might be good too. Did they also use a .cc domain name or something stupid like that?

You can be as creative as you want with a company name, that's not the problem. Usually the problem is coming up with a name that has legal clearance worldwide. I bet that was part of the the problem here.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2017 at 17:04 UTC
In reply to:

TyphoonTW: Months and months of "PREORDER AURORA 2018 PRO" ads everywhere, and then they suddenly change the name ? They couldn't think about it earlier ?_?

And the "lum" part can be related to their flagship product, Luminar.

Aurora is a more specialized program for HDR, so it doesn't exactly need to carry the company name.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2017 at 17:01 UTC
In reply to:

graybalanced: Nikon might not have had to shut that factory down if they had put a proper effort into compact cameras. When someone actually wants a pocket camera better than their smartphone, Sony, Canon and Panasonic are the brands with the reputation and the sales in this contracting market.

Nikon was supposed to come out with the DL series, which I was very interested in buying, but they cancelled it after not shipping for a year. If that line had succeeded in competing with the above three, this factory might still be running.

Yeah, but I never said "entry level." I'm talking about compacts like the RX100 series, Canon G7X series, Panasonic LX series. The Nikon DL series I mentioned fit into that category, not entry level.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2017 at 23:23 UTC

Nikon might not have had to shut that factory down if they had put a proper effort into compact cameras. When someone actually wants a pocket camera better than their smartphone, Sony, Canon and Panasonic are the brands with the reputation and the sales in this contracting market.

Nikon was supposed to come out with the DL series, which I was very interested in buying, but they cancelled it after not shipping for a year. If that line had succeeded in competing with the above three, this factory might still be running.

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2017 at 23:33 UTC as 77th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

maljo@inreach.com: $500 seems a bit pricy.

Not really pricey if you know what you are comparing it to.

$500 has been the list price of the ColorMunki for many years, because like this device, it can calibrate multiple devices, not just your monitor. (Although as others are pointing out here, this is not exactly the same.)

If you wanted to spend $200 or less, the story is the same as it has been: You get a calibrator that can only calibrate your screen and not other devices.

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2017 at 23:29 UTC
In reply to:

alfredsspekis: When one considers the cost and upgrades from the first lightroom it was never a cheap excercise

LR was actually a cheap exercise, in photography terms.

When Lightroom 1 came out, it competed with Apple Aperture. (Some thought Lightroom copied Aperture's design.) But Lightroom didn't copy the price: Aperture was $499. Lightroom came in at $299 and forced Apple to lower their price.

I think the Lightroom upgrades were $79. There were only 5 of those upgrades in the history of LR, from versions 2 through 6. Total cost of buying Lightroom 1 through 6 was $694, then. For 10 years...that's cheap! Remember when a single new copy of Photoshop was $699?

$694...that's less than any of the camera bodies I bought, and those usually don't stay in service for 10 years. I have bought multiple lenses that cost more than that.

Some unhappy LR users are going to MacPhun. I get emails from them all the time asking to upgrade to this year's version for $99. That's more than LR.

But maybe that's why so many are unhappy. Standalone LR used to be the cheap way to go, and we're losing it.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2017 at 17:41 UTC
In reply to:

saiko: Adobe's stranglehold has to end.
Google should dump some money to create free and open source alternatives to Photoshop, Illustrator, Lightroom, Indesign and put Adobe out of it's misery.

Realistically, all of these companies are in it for the money. The same way the majority of us go to work for the money. Few of us want to give away our time for free. Adobe, Apple, and Google have all done both very admirable things and things that seem outright greedy, but in the end they are all multi-billion dollar companies with stockholders and that is going to limit how much more virtuous any one of them is more than another.

At least Google sold Nik to Dx0 today. And that's no different an example than any of the others. The other day Dx0 was being criticized in the forums for questionable methodologies for their lens testing scores, today they're a hero for rescuing Nik from the dead software purgatory at Google. And so it goes.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2017 at 23:15 UTC
On article My experience at an Instagram influencer party (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bobthearch: I don't understand any of this, but it seems weird.
So it's people with lots of instagram followers posing with consumer products?

The reason they post with consumer products is because they either are being paid to put that brand on Instagram (product placement), which is how many Instagrammers make money, or, they want to get one of those contracts so they are showing that they can look good doing it.

Of course, there's only room for so many "brand ambassadors," so within a couple of years maybe 80% of the young people at that party will have to go get a real job.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2017 at 20:46 UTC
In reply to:

saiko: Adobe's stranglehold has to end.
Google should dump some money to create free and open source alternatives to Photoshop, Illustrator, Lightroom, Indesign and put Adobe out of it's misery.

Ha ha...Google? You want Google to save us? You need to brush up on history. Google already bought the entire photo product lines of Nik and Picasa, and what happened to them?

The reason Google bought them was to do EXACTLY what Adobe did: Use former desktop photo software as a starting point to build out cloud-based photo software. That's where all the code went that Google bought, to create cloud-based Google Photos. Google and Adobe have exactly the same goals for photography, provide a cloud-based "photos on any device" service to keep people in their bigger cloud ecosystem. Same goals as Apple and Amazon.

The original desktop applications Google bought? No longer developed.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2017 at 20:37 UTC
In reply to:

photomikeleth: It is simple, Adobe is a business, they will keep doing something till they do not make enough money on it then it will be gone. They only care about us as customers as long as they can get money from us, they are not our friends or family and they will go a different direction anytime they want!

Reality check here...the statement "Adobe is a business, they will keep doing something till they do not make enough money on it then it will be gone. They only care about us as customers as long as they can get money from us, they are not our friends or family"

applies to any commercial alternative you will choose. On1, Dx0, MacPhun, Affinity are not charities. They will make their software as long as they can get money from you. All of them. They will adapt and evolve their products to where they believe their market is. Every one of them.

They could get dropped like Aperture. Or they can get bought like Nik or Picasa, two companies whose software will never be updated again.

If you truly do not want to be left behind when your suppliers change course, you should only be using open source software. But even those projects sometimes fail to be maintained.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2017 at 20:35 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1630 comments in total)
In reply to:

graybalanced: Insightful article, not just clickbait…well done.

I wonder if DPReview will need to start adding a page to their review section for cloud-based photo software, evaluating the reliability, speed, and security of the cloud services underpinning these types of products. Given recent headlines, we should all be especially concerned about the security history of these companies, how often breaches happen, how they respond, etc.

@JimJulian I am well aware that the software is installed locally. I remind people of this all the time. What you're forgetting is that the new Lightroom CC defaults to uploading and storing all your photos into the cloud. This has obvious benefits, but it means that you should now be concerned with the security of the photo storage. If you do client work and it automatically all goes to the cloud, you do not want a security breach to result in your client's confidential images being released across the Internet.

To answer "what breaches are you talking about". In addition to the server breach above that released millions of user emails to hackers and spammers: There is a long history of Adobe Flash security vulnerabilities, and another long history of Adobe PDF vulnerabilities. And we can add one more to the pile:

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/09/in-spectacular-fail-adobe-security-team-posts-private-pgp-key-on-blog/

We need to know our photos are safe.

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2017 at 22:27 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1630 comments in total)

Insightful article, not just clickbait…well done.

I wonder if DPReview will need to start adding a page to their review section for cloud-based photo software, evaluating the reliability, speed, and security of the cloud services underpinning these types of products. Given recent headlines, we should all be especially concerned about the security history of these companies, how often breaches happen, how they respond, etc.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 23:45 UTC as 495th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

pdelux: I thought Adobe once said that Lightroom will always be offered as a non-subscription option.

Adobe cannot be trusted. Their Security practices have always been questionable. Now they want us to upload all our photos to the cloud. Queue data breach.

I am pretty sure the word they have used is "indefinitely." Which does not mean forever, except as wishful thinking.

Everyone saw this coming.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 23:27 UTC
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