graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

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On article Kamerar Lens Zoom Kit for iPhone 7 Plus review (24 comments in total)

Looks like someone had a nice day in Madrid...Parque del Retiro is a great park

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2017 at 01:25 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

angus rocks: Will this fit into my K-1000?

The problem is that like Sony, the bottleneck is not storage. If I try to shoot at more than 2 fps on my K1000, my thumb starts to cramp up on the film advance lever.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 00:31 UTC
In reply to:

Sean65: Very clever technology. So apple own a database of million of peoples fingerprints and now facial recognition. Wonder where this is going. Haha

@pagou, you posted a 6-year-old link about a problem that was fixed long ago. You can stop this on your own iPhone by going into iOS Location Services today and turn off Frequent Locations. It wasn't even "tracking" a specific location...it was a local cache of crowdsourced access points.

If you object to this concept, you must also object to Google and Android, because this is the same idea used by Google to crowdsource information like traffic conditions and which hours businesses are busiest. They get that data by anonymously aggregating connection data from phones passing through certain locations.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2017 at 01:02 UTC

Since DPR asked our opinion, my view is that this is too much at the rumor stage to be covered by DPR.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2017 at 00:42 UTC as 60th comment
In reply to:

Kabe Luna: I can't imagine how it's NOT relatively easy to fool face recognition. Certainly, it'd be easier than the fingerprint scanner. And it would require, potentially, acquiescing to your phone always watching. I'm not down with that. Hell, Siri is permanently disabled because I don't want to agree to being monitored. Hell, typing a password isn't sufficiently burdensome that I'd pay for the privilege of losing a measure of privacy.

One reason I prefer fingerprint unlocking over typing a password is because then my password can't be visually observed and recorded. Not just by the person sitting next to you on the train or plane or movie theater, but by the ubiquitous overhead cameras in restaurants, grocery store checkout lines, etc.

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2017 at 00:41 UTC
In reply to:

rugosa: Reminds me of my mother back in the 1990's saying that a finger print would be great for ATM instead of a PIN # until I told her that a thief could just cut your finger off and use it later. If you passed out at a party, or were asleep, or dead could a person unlock your phone with this 3D facial recognition? How about if you stole a famous persons phone and took it to one of those wax museums?

I believe I read that some fingerprint systems perform additional analysis to make sure there was blood flowing inside, i.e. verify it is a living human finger. Something similar could be done with 3D scanning so that it would say for instance "That isn't human skin, it's wax. Access denied"

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2017 at 00:38 UTC
On article Extremely dramatic video touts Canon's CMOS technology (193 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrBrightSide: More casual racism from the hipster set. Everything the author so gleefully mocks can be attributed to cultural differences between Japan and the very insular world of Seattle
The person who translated the voiceover definitely could have done a better job of omitting or contextualizing the culture-specific elements but all in all the mirthful reaction to the video just shows how ignorant the buttahkusai are to one of the worlds most intriguing and subtle nations.

"the very insular world of Seattle"

Your comment became suspect as soon as you said that. Insular Seattle? The Pacific Rim city with one of the busiest ports in the world because it's closer to Asian cities than other American ports? Inside the state that had an Asian governor for 8 years recently?

On a website where key staff moved to Seattle from England?

It's hard to get less insular than a staff from Europe working in North America in a building that probably has a view of the container ships coming in from the Pacific Ocean...which your last camera probably came in...

I watch a lot of NHK World television and to me, the Canon video is simply a typical example of the way the Japanese make videos. Which to me is always a little over-dramatic and emotional, which I laugh at from time to time, without being "racist." Just as I would laugh at the cliche explosions of a Michael Bay movie...that doesn't make me racist either.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 18:00 UTC
In reply to:

Shlomo Goldwasser: When I look at this, I'm like: I want it. But when you think about it there are not that many things to film in slomo that are not gimmicky. You could film your cat jumping or attacking or a watergun squirting. This is cool once or twice, but it hardly warrants a three layer sensor specifically made for this functionality.

I can only think of two frequent uses for this: sports and adult industries.

You left out a third of many other uses: Research.

I watch nature programs on TV, and slo-mo is frequently used so that you can more easily see the motion of fast-moving animals. With some animals, the frame rates of today's affordable cameras (60-120 fps) is not enough. The 1000 fps of the sensor in this article is better for subjects like hummingbirds.

There are many other ways to use high frame rate video to observe and analyze. It is easy to imagine cheap high speed video becoming useful, if it isnt already, in areas like manufacturing failure mode analysis, biology and wildlife management, etc.

We know time lapse video is useful in all kinds of creative and scientific pursuits. High frame rate video is simply the other end of that spectrum, and it has just as many opportunities.

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2017 at 21:47 UTC
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: Has he added a shadow/highlight slider yet?

bobbarber - We are in agreement much more than you think. Earlier I said that many images might require both curves and shadow/highlight. I understand how precise and valuable curves are, and how much more valuable they are when masked to specific areas. But shadow/highlight is also a valuable third way.

It sounds like you're underestimating the shadow/highlight sliders. Remember, there are some types of control you have with those that are difficult with masks. I understand masked curves. But I also understand that S/H and curves cannot completely replace the other.

If you want to work exclusively with curves, that's 100% OK and wonderful. But I strongly believe that dismissing shadow/highlight because it's "just one slider" is as misguided and self-limiting as Scott Kelby's claim that we no longer need to use curves because we now have shadow/highlight. Both are not true.

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2017 at 00:32 UTC
On article iPhone 7 Plus survives 13 hours in icy Russian river (98 comments in total)

The sense I'm getting from the posts is:

- If an Apple product falls short of its marketing claims, we need to jump all over it and call them on their dishonest lying.

- If an Apple product exceeds its marketing claims, we need to ignore it and not give publicity to companies who underpromise and overdeliver.

If that's the tone of your own post here, think about whether that's what you are trying to encourage...

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 00:26 UTC as 23rd comment
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: Has he added a shadow/highlight slider yet?

Curves don't use sliders because of the multiple points on the in/out curve. You need to get at each point individually.

The reason most shadow/highlight implementations use a slider is because there is more than one number going in and out along the tones. It is doing spatial analysis and edge detection, so you are not simply saying "take tone 23 and make it 26 instead" as you do with a curve. It's beyond masked curves.

You have the illusion of "less control" with a Shadow/Highlight slider because you see a simple slider, but it's a slider because there is more sophisticated and complex processing going on behind the scenes. And frankly, I think I have more real control using Shadow/Highlight because I get the results I want much faster than if I used curves. And I used curves for years and years. And I still use curves for the few remaining edge cases where they're better than shadow/highlight.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2017 at 00:59 UTC
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: Has he added a shadow/highlight slider yet?

HowaboutRAW - you are repeating incorrect information. Shadow/highlight does not produce a result that is reproducible with just Curves. Curves is a simple in/out curve: one value in, another value out per pixel. Shadow/highlight, as implemented in most software, does detail and edge detection with varying outputs based on localized content.

"Learn to use Curves" is not a helpful answer since Curves alone cannot reproduce Shadow/Highlight results. You would need at the very least to create multiple curves and masks for different tonal ranges.

Shadow/Highlight is based on research like the following:
http://people.csail.mit.edu/sparis/publi/2011/siggraph/

That is nothing like Curves.

I am not saying either S/H or Curves is better than the other, since that is not true either. In many cases, the best solution is to use both features together...since neither can fully replace the other.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2017 at 19:16 UTC
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

RSColo: I think there might be more contributions if people could make single one time donations. Think about all the complaining about the Adobe subscription model. I couldn't find any way to make a one time donation on the Patreon page.

Hey Alex, thanks for pointing that out, I stand corrected. This is a great opportunity to clear up confusion.

Some money is being asked for by individual GIMP developers. This article is only about Øyvind Kolas asking for monthly donations to support his work.

But the general GIMP project also asks for money. Those can be one-time donations through the GNOME Foundation, further down the GIMP page link.

Anyone who uses GIMP, especially out of dislike for commercial options, should give money to support GIMP development, unless their goal is to not pay anyone.

But as with so many things GIMP, the financial end lacks unity and cohesiveness, which leads to extensive user confusion which does not help the GIMP cause. If you give money to GIMP, make sure you understand who and what it is you are supporting. If you want to support the project in general, go through the GNOME Foundation. If you give through the Patreon link in this article, you're supporting one GIMP developer.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 23:07 UTC
On article GIMP seeks funding for future advanced features (220 comments in total)
In reply to:

RSColo: I think there might be more contributions if people could make single one time donations. Think about all the complaining about the Adobe subscription model. I couldn't find any way to make a one time donation on the Patreon page.

In a way, Alex's response just illustrates the general problem with GIMP. The way you make a one-time donation is not up front to be easily found by most users, but it is there if you want to geekily dig deeper into an option way off to the side, buried deep in some github commit...obscurely invisible to all non-geeks, just like the way a lot of GIMP works.

This also puts light on the problem with one-time donations: They are often not sustainable. Patreon is not Kickstarter where there is one goal and one amount. Those who use Patreon need long term help. They don't need a wave of one-time donations that only last a few months and then the money is out again.

Funny thing is, the GIMP developers came to the same conclusion as Adobe, Microsoft, etc: The most helpful financial stream is the one that's the most constant: Monthly payments. As much as we all might oppose subscriptions, it is revealing that even the open source community has chosen to ask for monthly payments too.

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2017 at 01:13 UTC

This warning goes hand in hand (no pun intended) with the advice to not post your airline boarding passes (the info makes it possible for someone else to go online and log into your flight as you), or pictures of your keys (keys are known to be easily be fabricated from photos).

I was watching Antiques Roadshow last night, and thought that it is only a matter of time before a crime ring applies facial recognition software to recordings of that show to get the names and then home addresses of the persons who own the most valuable items.

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2017 at 00:27 UTC as 20th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

mick232: I am not sure if we'd even call that a "nice to have" feature.

If Adobe wanted to "hijack" their own DNG, they wouldn't have done things like submit DNG to the ISO for inclusion as an international standard.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 19:58 UTC
In reply to:

mick232: I am not sure if we'd even call that a "nice to have" feature.

If all cameras saved to DNG, that would be "really really nice to have." No more waiting for converter software to reverse-engineer the proprietary formats with each new camera!

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2017 at 02:00 UTC
In reply to:

AKH: Apple was hardly a pioneer in the world of computers.

Anyway, nice to see these articles with a review of these old cameras.

AKH...to extend your argument, then, you would say that since democracy was invented by the Greeks, America never brought anything significant to world politics...

(Xerox inventing the mouse didn't do a thing for computing, until Apple integrated it into a mass market operating system.)

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2016 at 23:49 UTC
In reply to:

AKH: Apple was hardly a pioneer in the world of computers.

Anyway, nice to see these articles with a review of these old cameras.

Well, AKH, if that's how you define pioneers, then nothing of note has been done by anyone in the last 50 years. But that approach is flawed, because it ignores all pioneering innovations that brought computing to the masses. Because of all the wonderful things that the pioneers you named did do, it was all ivory-tower stuff that did not affect the man on the street one bit.

Apple, on the other hand, at multiple points in its history, did things that pushed computing into the hands of millions more humans. Just to pick one example, how much longer would we have had to wait for Microsoft to move beyond MS-DOS commands had Apple not shown everyone that mouse-based computing is much more accessible to the masses? I, for one, would not try to perform Photoshop-like image corrections using commands like the "pioneers" of computing would have been comfortable doing.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2016 at 00:27 UTC
In reply to:

AKH: Apple was hardly a pioneer in the world of computers.

Anyway, nice to see these articles with a review of these old cameras.

Apple has a well-documented, 40-year history of being a pioneer in the world of computers.

The Apple I (1976), Apple II, Mac (1984, with GUI and mouse), and iMac (first mass market USB ports) are all examples of computers Apple created that no one else was really doing at the time. You can say others were doing them in some labs, but no one was selling them mass market.

Microsoft had to radically alter what Windows was about after the original Mac came out, and Android completely redid what they were doing after they saw the iPhone came out.

The iPhone was pioneering because it was only 12 months before that everybody say a futuristic TED demo of a technology called "multi-touch". No one thought it would be in a product any time soon, and while Microsoft was trying to make it work in their furniture-sized original Surface, Apple put multi-touch in your pocket. That's pioneering.

Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint all came out on the Mac before they did on Windows.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2016 at 22:19 UTC
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