graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 894, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Rihass: It's the latest device. If they manage to screw that, they better find something else to do. Apple always says that on stage. "This is the best iphone we've ever made." No kidding. Apple you're the only ones making iphones and you had a year to add some features to the phone. For god sakes stop with the non sense advertisement.

"Non sense advertisement" ?

So in March when DxO reported that "Samsung Galaxy S7 edge is the new leader in the DxOMark smartphone rankings," that was a "non sense advertisement" for Apple too? Or for Samsung? Or would these "advertisements" be of any value to those companies when their competitors get to be the best too? That, to me, is "nonsense."

Maybe they just do their best to do an objective test, and the only people who think they're paid off are the fanboys/haters...

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2016 at 18:04 UTC
On article Flickr Marketplace image licensing program shuttered (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

doctor digi: "Shuttered" - do you mean "closed".

No doubt you "reached out" to them to find that out.

Sheesh. So sick of this BS-Speak.

Grammatically, "shuttered" is perfectly acceptable English.

What is really unfortunate is that regular news outlets already overuse the term when they want to say "closed," but recently, photography websites have overused it even more to the point that it is a cliché.

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2016 at 22:47 UTC
On article Teardown reveals Sony image sensors in iPhone 7 (167 comments in total)
In reply to:

ttran88: Only if it had Canon made sensors it would a dslr killer.

But then those phone cameras wouldn't have 4K video

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2016 at 01:15 UTC
On article Teardown reveals Sony image sensors in iPhone 7 (167 comments in total)
In reply to:

PKDanny: Samsung Galaxy is coming with 44mm x 33mm sensor!! LOL.

Do you wish your smartphone camera made pictures more worthy of being blown up? Choose Samsung!

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2016 at 01:14 UTC
On article Video: First look at the Panasonic G85/G80 (33 comments in total)
In reply to:

garyknrd: That looks to be a very nice travel camera.

Yes, that's why cameras have the features they do even though all of us only use 20% of a camera's features, because every one of us thinks the "essential" features are a completely different 20% than what any other photographer thinks.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 23:44 UTC
In reply to:

Matsu: Before I got really used to my keyboard and mouse, I was massively interested in customizable control surfaces, but after thousands of hours in front of various computer applications, I rarely think about that anymore. I do think a jog dial that scrolls through LR panels/sliders on the right side of the edit view might be useful though.

A jog dial could be more useful for the sliders and filmstrip navigation.

For the panels on any side of any module, there is already a full list of shortcuts. Check the Window menu. For example, to go down the right side panel is simply a matter of pressing Command-0, Command-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 17:15 UTC
On article Video: First look at the Panasonic G85/G80 (33 comments in total)
In reply to:

garyknrd: That looks to be a very nice travel camera.

@mgblack: GPS is not for your examples, where subjects are famous and their location is blindingly obvious. GPS is very useful for any location that is so ordinary that you not only can't remember where it is, you don't even know if it has a name.

Sometimes I put together a collection of images for an exhibition, and in writing the descriptions for the tags and catalog it is GPS that tells me which street corner in which obscure town in which country a certain photo was taken. Or exactly where on a trail next to which mountain a particular view was taken.

No one's memory is good enough to retain that kind of information for thousands of images.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 17:12 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Nikon stand report video (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

Thorgrem: Why are there no new Nikon 1 announcements?
It could be a great portable and blazing fast system if Nikon put some more effort in it.
They already invested a lot into the developing, so keep going and make it profitable.

"Replaced by the DL series" is, in practical terms, not any different than saying "replaced by a large empty shipping container."

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 16:56 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 First Impressions Review (132 comments in total)
In reply to:

tkbslc: The f1.4 aperture rating seems kind of like a scam given that it instantly drops to f2 as soon as you even look at the zoom lever.

For me, on the LX7 that turned out not to be a big factor since many of my shots were taken at the wide angle setting; the zoom was more for occasional convenience. And f2 is still better than sooooo many of the other cameras in this class.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 23:22 UTC
In reply to:

Fredy Ross: I wonder how Photomyne which is only $4.99 measures up to such an expensive scanner for old photos? I have been waiting for the Android version to come out for my mobile phone as it could be bought a month ago for iPhone. Says it scans edits and digitizes old photos. What do others think?

In reality, it may not matter all that much. The vast majority of the drugstore prints made in the last 5 decades probably have less than 3 megapixels worth of resolution in them.

In fact a 4x6 inch print at 300 dpi only has 2.1 megapixels of resolution in it. The extremely common 3.5" x 5" print has only 1.5 megapixels at 300 dpi. And that is assuming there is no motion blur from handheld snapshot cameras. The real resolution of most family photos may be closer to 1 megapixel. Since so many family snapshots were done with handheld cameras with slow film and no image stabilization of any kind, "preservation quality" won't necessarily mean professional quality, just enough to save what little sharpness is actually there will, in most cases, be OK.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 23:17 UTC
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 First Impressions Review (132 comments in total)

Regarding the aperture markings, the discrepancy when zooming in should not bother experienced LX7 users because it always happens on that camera too. I have learned that if I'm in aperture priority and zoomed in, the actual aperture can be seen at the bottom of the screen. I hope that is still the case on the LX10.

The biggest loser here? Nikon. I had my eye on the DL series; on paper it looks brilliant. Then Canon came out with the GX7 II which you can actually buy, and now the LX10 is probably going to hit the streets well before the tragically delayed DL.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 17:08 UTC as 38th comment | 1 reply
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX10/LX15 First Impressions Review (132 comments in total)

I take my LX7 everywhere because it's so much better than any phone camera. The only thing I didn't like about the LX7 was the small sensor. I was shopping for a 1" enthusiast compact and had my hand on my credit card for the Canon GX7 II, but thought I oughta wait until Photokina...and here is Panasonic with a 1" (somewhat) pocketable compact!

Disappointed by the disappearance of the ND filter and the UI/dial shortcomings, but glad the 120fps video is still in there. The 60fps option most cameras have is often not enough for really compelling slow motion. The LX7 only did 120fps in 720p mode, the LX10 can do it at 1080p.

But the cautionary tone of this First Impressions article makes me want for the full review.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 17:08 UTC as 39th comment | 2 replies
On article Canon EOS M5: What you need to know (548 comments in total)
In reply to:

graybalanced: Those posting this will sell well are correct. It's just a good camera, and with the kit lens it will sell very well into the kit lens crowd (Costco etc.)

I'm almost sold on it, I like it a lot. My only two misgivings are the limited lens selection compared to other mirrorless platforms, and 4K video. If I want to wait, I'm sure that situation will get better with the next generation. But if the reviews come back glowing enough, maybe I won't wait until the next generation.

Don't suggest that the lens selection includes connecting my massive constant aperture Canon EF/EF-S zooms with an adapter. To me that doesn't count because most of the reason I'm going mirrorless is to save space and weight for travel.

Mirrorless does not always have to be about saving weight for travel.
But in my case...it is.

The idea is not to use EF lenses. Once I go mirrorless, all my DSLR gear gets sold.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 16:57 UTC
In reply to:

vscd: What is iOS?

It's like Android but with color management

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 23:39 UTC
In reply to:

Fredy Ross: I wonder how Photomyne which is only $4.99 measures up to such an expensive scanner for old photos? I have been waiting for the Android version to come out for my mobile phone as it could be bought a month ago for iPhone. Says it scans edits and digitizes old photos. What do others think?

Many smartphone apps make pretty good document and photo scanners, actually. While smartphone cameras aren't perfect, they're pretty good, and the better scanning apps seem to be tailored to compensate for the quirks of phone cameras. For professional reproduction, sure, you need a real scanner, but a smartphone app should be good enough for "scanning" snapshots. More than good enough for documents.

The main thing is to give the smartphone lots and lots of light so you will not have slow shutter speed motion blur, and even light so you don't have hot spots.

And instead of the amazing Epson scanning technology that can scan a photo in "one second," your smartphone or any camera is going to digitize that photo in 1/60th of a second or 1/250th of a second...

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 23:33 UTC
On article Canon EOS M5: What you need to know (548 comments in total)

Those posting this will sell well are correct. It's just a good camera, and with the kit lens it will sell very well into the kit lens crowd (Costco etc.)

I'm almost sold on it, I like it a lot. My only two misgivings are the limited lens selection compared to other mirrorless platforms, and 4K video. If I want to wait, I'm sure that situation will get better with the next generation. But if the reviews come back glowing enough, maybe I won't wait until the next generation.

Don't suggest that the lens selection includes connecting my massive constant aperture Canon EF/EF-S zooms with an adapter. To me that doesn't count because most of the reason I'm going mirrorless is to save space and weight for travel.

Link | Posted on Sep 16, 2016 at 23:25 UTC as 45th comment | 3 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Canon PowerShot Pro70 (110 comments in total)

Out of curiosity, I looked up the raw converter support...the Pro70 is still listed on the Adobe raw support list, but it cannot be found on the Mac OS X or Windows 10 list of supported raw formats.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 23:35 UTC as 44th comment
In reply to:

JoachimStrobel: The sensor specs for all sensors except IPhone 7/7s indicate that they only can capture in sRGB.

Sensors don't have a color space. In dedicated cameras, the color space is determined by the conversion from raw to JPEG; if they save raw then that decision is deferred until you process in your raw software. In phones, that decision is built into the phone firmware. But now that these phones support raw, it's the same as the dedicated cameras, the color space can remain undefined until you run the photos through a raw app and export.

The specs are probably talking about the output color spaces supported by the in-camera raw-JPEG converter.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 00:34 UTC
In reply to:

Aleksandar Kandic: Someone should tell the kids they will NOT become good photographers just by praising Adams and quoting him on their web portfolios.
Ansel is a "wannabe", there is so much compositional diversity, so much unreasonable, pathetic strife for symmetry in his images that you can tell he's artistically uneducated. Art is so much more than "burning and dodging". You need to say something meaningful, which is consistent with truth and reality.
Maybe we will see an article on the history of art, geometry, aesthetics, something really substantial here on DPReview. Then you will realize how shallow Ansel's images really are: one claims A is B, the other A is not B, the third something else, and there is no truth, there is no consistency, it's just a big mess.
The technical aspect is pretty much everything Ansel has to offer, but that's irrelevant, since it changes quickly. On the other hand, geometry, composition and archetypal meanings remain forever.
Sharpness is meaning, not optics & Mpx!

Your statement "The technical aspect is pretty much everything Ansel has to offer" is questionable because so many people, including many non-technical people who know nothing of darkroom techniques, love Ansel Adams photos.

Ansel Adams' photos strongly appeal to many people on an *emotional* level. That is the proof right there. Your work cannot have such a compelling emotional draw if you are only a technician. For his work to have such a strong emotional effect on his viewers is impossible unless he himself was putting in a very high level of emotion and other artistic elements.

I posted this in another Ansel Adams article here...those who say Adams was "only a technician" or "made photos with pure emotion and art" are both wrong, because both are one-sided extremes. The reason he has so much appeal is he had large amounts of both, and unlike many, he could balance them. His advanced technical knowledge allowed him to amplify his artistic talent beyond many others.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2016 at 17:59 UTC
In reply to:

matthew saville: I know it's cliche, but I still wonder how Ansel would feel about digital manipulation today. Specifically, the lengths that some go to create in photoshop what they visualized in the field.

I ponder this because, despite his aggressive negative / darkroom manipulations, he still shied from other forms of alteration even though they were surely within his ability. The case in point which I have brought up before: Moonrise, Hernandez doesn't have a gigantic moon superimposed in it, nor do any of his other images that include a moon as far as I can tell. For whatever reason, he left them "actual size" (to scale) and stuck with burning & dodging and other tonal manipulations in order to influence what the viewer saw in his final result.

I don't claim to know what Ansel would do today with a raw digital negative and a copy of Lightroom / Photoshop, but I do think it is an interesting observation that even such a champion of darkroom manipulation decided to draw a line somewhere...

"Photoshopping" an image has two meanings. Sometimes it means darkroom-type manipulations, exposure control/dodging/burning/masking, but digitally. Other times it means artificial compositing effects, like your "fake big moon" example.

It's already acknowledged by those who knew Ansel Adams himself that he would have gone "all in" on the first kind of "Photoshopping." That is right up his alley, all the curve graphs and precise numbers.

And that is where the line would be drawn. While Adams would have gleefully extended his extreme darkroom manipulations of exposure into digital, he would have not crossed the line over into compositing and remixing. That's just not what he did. Darkroom compositing was Jerry Uelsmann territory.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2016 at 17:54 UTC
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