graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 1148, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

PhozoKozmos: for LR noobs
or for very experienced users who can't actually 'learn' to use LR effectively from scratch (=as fast as it takes to shoot instantly perfect exposures)

What do you mean "cannot be changed?" Profiles don't change the slider settings...because you are expected to add your own personal adjustments on top of them, which is, again, exactly what you are asking for, manual control.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 22:44 UTC
In reply to:

PhozoKozmos: for LR noobs
or for very experienced users who can't actually 'learn' to use LR effectively from scratch (=as fast as it takes to shoot instantly perfect exposures)

You seem to be confusing "profiles" with "presets". No, this is not about Instagrammy filters that do the editing for you. If you think that's what this is, you do not understand it. This is more like teaching a photographer how to alter the look by modifying the darkroom chemistry. That doesn't mean the photographer is unskilled. That is not for your "noobs".

Profiles are more like *starting points* for still doing exactly what you want: Use LR effectively with your own adjustments.

It's almost as if you have not even read the SDK you are commenting on. I did read it. It talks about the difference between DCPs, LUTs, and XMP profiles. Sample computer code is also included. Does that sound like a "noob" subject to you?

It's an SDK...Software Development Kit...for developers. Engineers. Not "noobs", not end users except for experts.

Its as if you would say that Ansel Adams was a noob because he relied on darkroom tricks instead of getting a perfect picture in the camera.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 22:23 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: ive used gimp for windows , but struggled with it ... powerful but not intuitive , i couldnt figure it out

GIMP is great, but be careful about overselling it. GIMP may have had a few features before Photoshop, but it is still very disappointing to see that the release notes in the last 6 months for GIMP mention several "new" features that have been in Photoshop for 15 to 20 years!

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2018 at 20:44 UTC
In reply to:

xPhoenix: Interesting. I just quit Flickr due to a new privacy policy that just came out. I know we all give up privacy by the very act of going online, but this sounded very invasive.

https://www.cnet.com/news/yahoo-aol-oath-privacy-policy-verizon-emails-messages/

I wonder how things will be with SmugMug?

Well, Smugmug is a very different company than Verizon/Oath, the one that previously owned Flickr.

Verizon/Oath is a multinational conglomerate critically dependent on advertising income, where Flickr was just this misfit subsidiary that came along with the Yahoo acquisition.

Smugmug is a privately owned family business out of Utah which doesn't put ads on websites, and seems to have a pretty good overall philosophy when it comes to privacy and digital photography, based on how their photo website product is structured. That's the other thing, they actually care about photography.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2018 at 06:59 UTC
In reply to:

Bokeh Blues: $700 for 1tb? What a joke. Would rather just buy a bunch of SD cards.

@Bokeh Blues, make sure you are comparing apples to apples. The Gnarbox has a 1TB NVMe SSD, not the more common SATA SSD. If you do a price check on a 1TB NVMe SSD, you will find that it is close to the price of the entire Gnarbox.

If you are comparing a 1TB SATA SSD and saying it is "actually way cheaper," you are comparing an SSD that is larger, heavier, and not nearly as fast as the NVMe drive in the Gnarbox.

Many new ultrabooks (PC and Mac) use NVMe SSDs because they are smaller and lighter than SATA, while being able to achieve 1000-3000MB/sec throughput. The "way cheaper" SATA drives like the common Samsung and Crucials can only do 300-700MB/sec. NVMe makes sense in the Gnarbox since it is much smaller while also being faster.

If there is a legitimate complaint about NVMe in this thing, it's that Gnarbox advertises transfers of up to 450MB/sec, but that doesn't even saturate SATA. It had better achieve higher throughput to computer via USB-C to justify the cost of NVMe.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2018 at 21:30 UTC
In reply to:

darlot: on the other news, Adobe released a tone of RAW profiles to mess up all the color accuracy of DreamColor Z27x G2.

Irony!

How would raw profiles mess up the color accuracy? Any good raw work depends on the monitor being accurate.

Are you confusing color correction with color grading?

Or are you confusing the new camera profiles (realism) with the new creative profiles (Instagrammy color wackery)?

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2018 at 21:14 UTC

""the world’s first integrated keyboard-based input switching KVM to easily switch between devices."

Not unless it ships with its own keyboard with buttons for that. If it just lets you assign keyboard shortcuts to KVM switching, it is NOT the world's first. If you own an NEC PA monitor, which has KVM functionality so I can switch using this monitor, keyboard, and Wacom tablet between my desktop and laptop, you can already assign keyboard shortcuts for each device input, and this monitor is several years old.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2018 at 18:41 UTC as 19th comment
In reply to:

DotCom Editor: With a teeny tiny lens fronting a teeny tiny sensor on today's smartphones, positioning a graduated filter in the exact optimum spot is likely to be next to impossible. Perhaps the company will add a vernier dial control knob to raise and lower the filter by a microscopic distance for each knob rotation.

Of course, Sunday is April Fool's day. Are we starting just a wee bit early?

Yeah, a graduated filter is going to go from clear to 1% clear since the small phone lens isn't going to reach the really dark end

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2018 at 22:11 UTC
On article Lytro is officially shutting down (207 comments in total)
In reply to:

icexe: I'm almost ashamed to admit I still have no idea how it actually works. How does one go about setting the focus point? Do you do it in the camera and then download the image? Or do you need to install special software to post-process the image? What format is the image in? Can I import it into my favorite image application so I can edit it?

All covered in the long string of articles that explained Lytro back when they were getting a lot of PR for first their consumer, then their cinema tech campaigns. It's all there on the Internet.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2018 at 23:16 UTC
In reply to:

Bowlomatic: Can we not call an 8 x 10 transparency a "slide"? And, it might interest you that everyone was drum scanning large format film back in the "olden" days. We'd hitch up the buckboard and head on into town for supplies, and drop film off at the dry goods store "fer processin"...

You just made me conjure up a mental image of a gigantic slide carousel big enough to store a tray of 8x10 transparencies, in mounts!

I wonder if anyone ever built something like that...

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2018 at 00:46 UTC
In reply to:

Tons o Glass 0 Class: 709MP file viewed with a 2.3MP screen - time for a monitor upgrade!

My A1081 20-inch Cinema Display still works great, but I only use it as as second monitor now, since the image quality of the old Cinema Display is kind of embarrassing compared to the excellent wide gamut NEC SpectraView I now use as the main monitor.

@mick232, at least if a 5K iMac was used (5120 x 2880), there would be almost 15 megapixels on screen to view it with!

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2018 at 00:44 UTC
In reply to:

BobT3218: Buy Adobe shares for your grandchildren! What happens when a cloud services user dies? We all die. Payments stop. The executor is unlikely to know which services were used and even less likely to know the user name or password. Who owns the images? Possession is 9/10 of the law as they say. In time, Adobe or its successor will be sitting on a gold mine of archival professional quality images which deceased cloud services users have inadvertently left them and payed Adobe for the privilege.

It's a very important thought, no matter which software or service you use. You must leave instructions about how your survivors can access every online account containing your life's work, especially if valuable family photos are in the mix.

At least with Lightroom CC, after you stop paying, you have a year to download your photos for free, and there's a free LR cloud download utility to bring them all back in one batch. Descendents should be told that they do not have to pay to retrieve photos from a dead relative with an unpaid account, but you need to tell them how to get into the account.

The above post also will not apply to people like me who don't store very much work in the Adobe cloud to start with, even though I use the applications. I still store and back up to local and off site drives.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2018 at 00:26 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: adobe make very useful , but poorly coded software , they have virtually ignored the move to multiple cores that cpus have made in the past years .... tht they continue to ignore optimising their code and are so slow even on cutting edge machines tell me all i need about this company

its why idont use their software any more , that and the subscrition based model

cosinaphile, the links you posted were accurate until the last two updates which many have benchmarked as demonstrably faster. Your links are now old. Here are some current links.

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Lightroom-Classic-CC-Version-7-2-Performance-1110/

https://photographylife.com/lightroom-6-vs-cc-7-1-vs-7-2-performance-comparison

What you did was like claiming that Ronald Reagan is President, because you posted links saying he was. True, but outdated and not accounting for current facts.

This isn't necessarily a defense, it took competition to wake them up and make them work. But now they're working at it.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2018 at 23:35 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Zeee: Never heard of this guy in my life but some of the things he says in the article are just bizarre to someone my age. I'm guessing it's a generational thing though, to me and many of my friends/people my age that I know, the idea of "The heat of the gazes between people, the charged mystery that arises from capturing chance moments on the fly" is honestly creepy. To each their own though

Well, that's exactly the problem: If you're not interested in this genre and yet you comment on it, it's like some music snob looks through your records and decides your stuff is terrible.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 22:06 UTC

What's fascinating is the intersection of "people who looked at the awful sample photos" and "people who decided to risk their money"

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 21:49 UTC as 88th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Alex Zeee: Never heard of this guy in my life but some of the things he says in the article are just bizarre to someone my age. I'm guessing it's a generational thing though, to me and many of my friends/people my age that I know, the idea of "The heat of the gazes between people, the charged mystery that arises from capturing chance moments on the fly" is honestly creepy. To each their own though

The main difference between this guy and Joel Meyerowitz is that I have long heard of, and really admire, the work of Joel Meyerowitz.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2018 at 21:47 UTC
In reply to:

JRM PT: I am very curious about this tablets but I'm afraid that I find it a little too weird to look at the screen and use a pen on a black sheet... maybe it's just a question of trying. Need to improve my editing skills first though.

@Class A, I can agree with what you said, given your applications. I do not think a tablet is very useful with Lightroom or Capture One. They don't really take advantage of it. A Shuttle Pro would be good with those applications.

But if we were talking about digital painting or photo retouching in Photoshop or similar, where subtle brushwork can actually be done, a tablet has real value there.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2018 at 01:30 UTC
In reply to:

yaxexa: They removed the Multi-touch gesture! :/

They didn't remove it. It never existed for the current Intous line. Multi-touch is part of the Intous PRO line. This mid-grade Intous is not a replacement for that.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 18:08 UTC
In reply to:

JRM PT: I am very curious about this tablets but I'm afraid that I find it a little too weird to look at the screen and use a pen on a black sheet... maybe it's just a question of trying. Need to improve my editing skills first though.

Class A, I wonder if you actually spent any significant time using one.

Keyboard shortcuts - thousands of artists use one hand on styles, other hand on keyboard for shortcuts. I do it that way too. It's no problem. Stylus is easier to keep in hand than a mouse if the other hand needs to go over the keyboard.

Pressure sensitivity - again, it works for thousands. If you don't like it or can't manage to make it work for yourself, that's one thing, but it really does work. The other features work fine too (tilt angle etc.)

Crossing the screen - you do NOT have to move your whole arm. Only if you use a big tablet! I use a smaller Wacom and I only have to move maybe my whole wrist. You can also program the shortcut keys on the tablet to jump to screen locations or switch between multiple monitors.

Tablets are too useful and too much more capable than mice to be dismissed. It sounds like you never mastered it. I bought my first Wacom in the 90s and never stopped...I like it too much!

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 18:07 UTC
In reply to:

Michael Soppa: I know its kinda expensive but would it be possible to use one of those new iPad Pro tablets together with a Apple Pencil as a tablet?

Yes, there are several apps that will allow you to do that. The top competitors are Astropad and Duet Pro. You install the companion apps on the Mac side and the iPad, the Mac app sends the screen image to the iPad, and you manipulate it with the Apple Pencil.

There are more apps that do this, but they are not as good and do not take full advantage of the Apple Pencil. Astropad and Duet are the best ones.

Obviously it would be a dumb idea to spend $1000 on an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil just to do this, but it's a great idea if you already own that hardware. If you don't already have the hardware then you should also be looking at a Wacom Cintiq which also puts the computer image on the tablet screen. so you can paint directly on the image with the stylus.

While you can paint on the tablet itself with apps like ProCreate, if you need to use real Photoshop or other desktop apps that would be the motivation to use a tablet as a peripheral to a computer.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2018 at 18:01 UTC
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