graybalanced

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 11, 2009

Comments

Total: 843, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Popular Prisma photo app now available on Android (32 comments in total)
In reply to:

NJOceanView: I am still trying to ascertain whether their TOS means they also have rights to our original photos, vs. just their treatments of them. I'm fine with the latter, but not the former. Can any attorneys in the group try to parse out their language?

You're wondering abut the "the extent of their rights to that original" when they explicitly say "Prisma does not claim ownership of any Content that you post on or through the Service". They aren't claiming rights to your original.

The reality is this. Can they sell your originals without paying you? Technically there's nothing stopping them, you sent the original, they now have it. Is that legal based on their TOS? no, not in the USA without the proper license, which their TOS doesn't seem to claim. Can they get away with it if their company is based where USA laws have no influence, almost certainly.

Because the TOS and implications are not much different than when you upload your photos to Google Photos or Costco or Dropbox, who probably all have servers all over the world, the answer to this is beyond whatever the terms say. It is now in the realm of how much you trust them, how paranoid you are.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2016 at 23:43 UTC
On article Popular Prisma photo app now available on Android (32 comments in total)
In reply to:

NJOceanView: I am still trying to ascertain whether their TOS means they also have rights to our original photos, vs. just their treatments of them. I'm fine with the latter, but not the former. Can any attorneys in the group try to parse out their language?

It doesn't look like there's much ambiguity here. The TOS says "Prisma does not claim ownership of any Content that you post on or through the Service"

The rights that they do obtain only seem to be a standard non-exclusive license, they look the same as what is needed for any service that is going to host or process content online, including the TOS of this very site, that you agreed to when you posted.

(I am not a lawyer)

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 23:59 UTC
In reply to:

ThirstyDursty: What gaps are left between this and PS?

Plugin support would be one area I assume?

Fujica, you are confusing two different features. Yes, Affinity depends on OS X Digital Camera Compatibility updates for the list of cameras it supports. But that is separate from the raw develop module itself. Since Affinity has more raw develop capability than most (probably all?) other programs in its price range, I think it is unfair to dismiss the Affinity raw feature set based on the completely separate issue of camera compatibility. Affinity may use the same OS X camera import compatibility as Aperture or Photos, but the features used to edit raw are much different than Aperture or Photos!

Almost all Mac programs rely on Apple for raw compatibility because they simply don't have the resources of Adobe to do all that reverse engineering themselves for every last raw camera on the market. This is another argument for making camera companies standardize on DNG output so that specific raw updates would no longer be needed and companies like Affinity could compete better.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2016 at 17:46 UTC
In reply to:

ThirstyDursty: What gaps are left between this and PS?

Plugin support would be one area I assume?

"Basically the total ACR module"

How is this missing? Affinity has its entire Raw Develop persona (module).

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2016 at 23:47 UTC
In reply to:

Yake: When we have those whispers of ideas, a lot of people don't pursue them because we still have to earn a living. It's a necessity, not a choice. How nice that one photographer can float through life on philanthropy and big ideas, apparently unbound by conventional things like finances and time.

If you know anything about Cowart and his work, you'd know he's coming from a good place. He is only challenging people the same way a football coach or army sergeant would yell at their trainees to step up and stop holding themselves back from being greater. Some with thin skins feel insulted by that type of motivation.

Of course you don't need to be rich to make a difference in charity. Some studies show that the poor give proportionately more of their income to charity than the rich. And in the poorest churches, the poorest worshippers voluntarily put money in the collection plate.

It's legitimate to call people on their fears. Too many people let themselves be motivated by it. Like being so frightened of crime and violence that they refuse to travel. (By the numbers, violent crime has been declining in the US for years.) It's perfectly legit to ask people if their fears are holding them back from good things.

It is admirable that Cowart is not a coward.

Link | Posted on Jul 21, 2016 at 00:10 UTC
In reply to:

graybalanced: The issue I see with the lofty promises is that color matching is more than about monitor calibration. Sure, this thing can make a profile. But how does it make sure the user doesn't crank monitor brightness all the way, making the profile worthless? How does it make sure the printer settings are correct, because if they aren't the colors probably won't match the screen no matter how accurate the screen profile is? How does it make sure the user doesn't export web graphics as Adobe RGB, making them look wrong?

Too many critical questions not answered yet. I hope they come clean about them.

I've owned and used at least three calibration tools over many years. Current one is the Colormunki which I use for both screen and printer.

Again, your view is too narrow. Re-read my first post, where I said this is about sooooo much more than how easy it is to use the calibrator itself.

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2016 at 23:53 UTC
In reply to:

graybalanced: The issue I see with the lofty promises is that color matching is more than about monitor calibration. Sure, this thing can make a profile. But how does it make sure the user doesn't crank monitor brightness all the way, making the profile worthless? How does it make sure the printer settings are correct, because if they aren't the colors probably won't match the screen no matter how accurate the screen profile is? How does it make sure the user doesn't export web graphics as Adobe RGB, making them look wrong?

Too many critical questions not answered yet. I hope they come clean about them.

Not that mass market. Look at the video. They are targeting artistic users who care about color but simply don't want to be technical, and that is a lot of people.

The picture is not as absolute and black-and-white as you keep making it out to be. Look in the middle...

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2016 at 00:02 UTC
In reply to:

graybalanced: The issue I see with the lofty promises is that color matching is more than about monitor calibration. Sure, this thing can make a profile. But how does it make sure the user doesn't crank monitor brightness all the way, making the profile worthless? How does it make sure the printer settings are correct, because if they aren't the colors probably won't match the screen no matter how accurate the screen profile is? How does it make sure the user doesn't export web graphics as Adobe RGB, making them look wrong?

Too many critical questions not answered yet. I hope they come clean about them.

Fujica, sure, but we are not talking about me, or me screwing up. I know not to change the brightness, I even disabled the brightness buttons on my wide gamut monitor. I know about warmup periods (which, by the way, is not necessarily 30 minutes in the age of the LED backlight; 30 minutes was more of a CRT/CCFL requirement).

This product is being pitched as mass market. "It's cheap and super easy and always accurate." The mass market leaves their laptop/tablet display on Auto Brightness default based on the ambient light sensor, which is not good for this. The mass market doesn't know about warmups and starts adjusting color as soon as the open the laptop lid. I think you and I can agree that this product had better include some end user education, or it is severely overpromising how well it can work.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2016 at 04:36 UTC

The issue I see with the lofty promises is that color matching is more than about monitor calibration. Sure, this thing can make a profile. But how does it make sure the user doesn't crank monitor brightness all the way, making the profile worthless? How does it make sure the printer settings are correct, because if they aren't the colors probably won't match the screen no matter how accurate the screen profile is? How does it make sure the user doesn't export web graphics as Adobe RGB, making them look wrong?

Too many critical questions not answered yet. I hope they come clean about them.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2016 at 23:21 UTC as 3rd comment | 8 replies
On article Adobe boosts Lightroom Mobile with Raw editing for iOS (60 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ribbit74: Has anybody tried the new version yet? Does it have camera profiles?

It claims to have both raw camera profiles and lens correction profiles. Haven't tried either yet but it looks like someone else has later in this thread.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2016 at 23:17 UTC
On article Adobe boosts Lightroom Mobile with Raw editing for iOS (60 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nobby2016: wow.. i bet we all will get rid of our desktops now.

more social media crap for the smartphone crowd.... that is where adobe sees the future. billions of smartphone users who don´t know sh** about photography or image editing.

and elia has not a single bad word to say about adobes new mobile app.... sure.
we all know tons of PERFECT products.
or maybe all this mobile stuff is just not for me and i am too old with 34 years.

meanwhile lightrooms development is slowing down to a hold.

Nobby2016 said "...billions of smartphone users who don´t know sh** about photography or image editing..."

It's very obvious that is not who Adobe is targeting. If that is what they wanted, they would have stuck with an oversimplified, unproductive app like some of the others they have.

But this has raw support now, this has a growing number of the serious controls from desktop Lightroom like lens corrections and local adjustments. I used to prefer Snapseed, but LR Mobile is getting to be a serious contender. Put it on one of the new wide-gamut factory-calibrated iPad Pros or Samsung Tabs and it should do well enough until you can get back to the desktop.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2016 at 23:38 UTC

Many of us are also surprised when photographs reveal that we have more mass than expected...

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 21:41 UTC as 7th comment
On article 8K Helium Super 35mm sensor on the way from RED (86 comments in total)
In reply to:

noflashplease: I shudder to think about the computing resources required to actually edit uncompressed 8K video.

Technically, nobody edits uncompressed 2K/4K/8K video. No affordable computers can handle true uncompressed HD video. All of those formats are recorded with high quality compression, and to make it possible to play back and edit, a critical part of the editing system are the codecs (compressor/decompressor) paired with monster GPUs and optimized for each other so that you can get real time editing.

If that is not possible, then you use a proxy workflow which is a standard part of Final Cut Pro, Premiere Pro, etc.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 21:23 UTC
On article 8K Helium Super 35mm sensor on the way from RED (86 comments in total)
In reply to:

Neez: I don't think they should use chemical elements in the name, unless it's involved in the manufacturing process or something. Do they use helium to make this sensor?? Otherwise, it doesn't seem right to call it the Helium Sensor.

Like if i were to call a car, the Toyota Propane vehicle, people would be all kinds of confused.

Are you using a Retina Display or driving a Jeep Cherokee? The first probably has no eye parts, the second no Native Americans.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 00:45 UTC
On article 8K Helium Super 35mm sensor on the way from RED (86 comments in total)
In reply to:

FuhTeng: Do movies need the extra resolution over 4K?

From the perspective of film, 8K is not "extra resolution." The best scans of film motion pictures have been done at 8K to get the full level of detail out of the film.

http://in70mm.com/news/2008/baraka_restored/index.htm

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 00:43 UTC
In reply to:

Iamnotarobot: So he was basically a Photoshop master... if we put it in today's term... don't have too much respect for that...

It's not a bad thing to be a Photoshop master. It is EXACTLY like the darkroom in that there are two kinds of darkroom-or-Photoshop users: Those who follow the recipes, and those who create them.

Ansel would not use Photoshop like a noob with plug-ins. Ansel would stack layers and curves (which look like the curve graphs in his books), using blending modes, channels, and masks using the advanced knowledge of the top 1% of Photoshop users. If Ansel was teaching Photoshop at conferences, we would probably be looking on in awe of his deft and masterful rare ability with the deepest parts of Photoshop, like watching Dan Margulis or Vincent Versace. Ansel would be demoing Digital Zone System while talking dot gain, transfer functions, color profiles, and maybe custom gray ink mixes for inkjet B&W a la Jon Cone or Paul Roark.

Not everyone is only using Photoshop to overcook their HDR shots or to swap heads of smartphone pics for your Internet meme post. There are true Photoshop masters.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 00:38 UTC
In reply to:

Chris Noble: Another DPReview piece of product advertising masquerading as a news story, this time with "Comments" from distributor "AriFLM". And not a single product feature that you can't find in other, less expensive competitors.

You know, crazy conspiracy theories work in reverse too. DPReview is wholly owned by Amazon.com, so they are often accused of cheerleading all kinds of cameras so that everybody clicks the Amazon link to go buy them.

But this tripod is not available on Amazon. This tripod is not even on the market yet, it is only being pre-sold through IndieGoGo which as far as I know has no connection to Amazon. I tried searching for "FLM tripod" on Amazon, and nothing came up.

What would motivate Amazon to allow DPReview to push a product that Amazon cannot sell? Based on this, Occam's Razor suggests you are wrong, and that this is probably not paid advertising.

(How can any photo site provide any photo news without reporting new product announcements? Do you think the most virtuous photo site is the one you can never go to read about the latest releases, because it might be accused of advertising? How useful is that?)

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2016 at 18:15 UTC
In reply to:

capanikon: ... aaaaaand "full frame" just got it's ass handed to it. Permanently.

Seriously..."full-frame" is just another way of saying "one size up from the one you bought." If a guy shoots with a 6x7, Mr. One-Up will say "I guess that's nice...of course Ansel Adams shot with an 8x10 to get _real_ quality..."

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2016 at 00:09 UTC

The cynic would say this is another concession to be allowed to operate in the Chinese market. Putin also wouldn't mind having his finger on that "no camera zone" button...

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2016 at 23:31 UTC as 177th comment
In reply to:

AD in KC: Why are we so instantly enamored with photographers who are dead? How many living, breathing artists are out there who can't get a gallery to return their calls?

You guys kid, but seriously, much of the wide appeal of Vivian Maier's work was not just that she was a good photographer, but it is the Chicago of the mid 20th century, with the cars, buildings, appliances, ads, signs, and other artifacts that are long gone.

Eric, you asked us what we want to know. But this isn't Literary Review, it's DPReview. If you don't have photographs of what you saw 50 years ago, that's a PERFECT illustration of what this photographer has that today's do not, regardless of how old they might be. Photography is about showing, not just telling.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2016 at 23:25 UTC
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