Erez Marom

DPReview Contributor
Lives in Israel Israel
Has a website at www.erezmarom.com
Joined on Sep 5, 2010

Comments

Total: 340, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

santamonica812: Very interesting article. (Although it's not necessary for your story...)...what drone did you use, and why did you pick that one?

I use a Phantom 4 Pro. Good compromise between portability and sensor size and quality.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2018 at 07:59 UTC
In reply to:

Sports Shooter: No!! Wrong marketing exercise from the sponsors to promote Greenland in such conditions.. why should I go there in the middle of snowstorms? Someone posted that Greenland is the new Iceland. Not so with very expensive flights and conditions like the ones on the photos.
The photographer did what he had to do but personally I would go to Iceland

I think Greenland is spectacular in winter. Not everyone has to spend all day outside, and weather is usually better than it was on the first 1-2 days of my trip (see next part).
I expect much more winter tourism in Greenland in the years to come.

Link | Posted on May 6, 2018 at 09:18 UTC
In reply to:

mpippik: Great photos! They make me want to visit Greenland. BTW, I've found cold, humid (sea fog) conditions at sea level to be the most uncomfortable. At higher altitudes, e.g. 2,500 - 3,000 m in Yellowstone N. P., my wife and I were surprised to find -10 C to be comfortable in short-sleeved shirts! Perhaps the snow on the ground acted as a solar reflector, too.

Exactly. Imagine -25 with gale force wind :)

Link | Posted on May 6, 2018 at 09:16 UTC
In reply to:

2stepbay: Regardless of the photographic quality, anyone that shoots in -25C or colder deserves many kudos plus an all expense paid trip to a rehab centre. ;)

I too look forward to learning how he was able to successfully operate his camera/lenses in such inhospitable conditions.

-30 without wind is far easier to cope with then -15 with wind. The problematic part of my trip was -25 plus gale force wind. Equipment was fine as long as it wasn't directly exposed to the wind.
I'll be submitting my request for that all-expenses-paid rehab! ;)

Link | Posted on May 6, 2018 at 09:15 UTC
In reply to:

Julian: Would be interesting to know what gloves you used as that is always a problem for me, there are very few good solutions to feeling the controls, and being able to change camera settings without exposing the finger tips. My current best is 2 gloves, one thin inner glove and then the top glove with fingertips that fold back, but even then you really feel the cold on your fingertips, and risk frostbite.

I used regular gloves plus seal skin mittssupplied by my guide. I also put chemical warmers into my regular gloves after the initial miserable experience.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2018 at 18:56 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 4: From a helicopter (30 comments in total)
In reply to:

anticipation_of: Erez, I’m glad the trip led to such good things for you. The pictures you’ve shared here have been awesome, and I’ve enjoyed seeing them. Thanks for sharing them with us and for talking about how you got them.

Thank you, very glad to know you've enjoyed the series!

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2018 at 08:19 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 3: At Sea (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lil g: I give up. Where's the second boat? I would like to see it for scale. Another great set of images and article Erez.

Correct :)

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2018 at 19:56 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 3: At Sea (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

22codfish: You've got to have a known something in the foreground to gage the sizes of the flows. A boat with people on deck for example. I've never seen a volcanic flow, so I don't know what is the safe zone or how a boat would fit in the photo. Is the hot flow so far away that even people on a boat would be too small to see?

It's not far away at all - it's actually too close to have another boat between us and the lava. I also assume no one would volunteer to swim any closer ;)

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2018 at 18:13 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 3: At Sea (44 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZeBebito: That’s a very dangerous session and the results are excellent. Another proof that Canon is up for any task regardless of its “limited” DR.

Thank you ZeBebito.
I'm glad you liked the shots but please note this wasn't dangerous at all. The captain is highly experienced and we were at a safe distance from the lava.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2018 at 18:12 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 2: Grounded (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

need to think of a unique name: Great information/photos Erez! Any advice on changing lens on the lava field? Would the heat and harsh gases (hydrogen sulphur, sulphur dioxide etc) cause issues?
Can't wait to get back to the Big Island and shoot on the field and from a boat :-)

Thank you. No issues with exchanging lenses :)

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 14:01 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 2: Grounded (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jake2046: I particularly love the one with the crack...nicely done. I would love to visit it something...but form a scale 1-10...how danger is it to come that close to the lava?

It's really not dangerous as long as you hire a guide and you are not reckless.

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2017 at 08:43 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 2: Grounded (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

stevo23: Did you have to throw your shoes away?

I used metal feet.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2017 at 09:40 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 2: Grounded (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

stevo23: Did you have to throw your shoes away?

No. The heat was just too intense to stay on super hot ground for too long.
Maybe I was imagining, but the soles of the shoes felt like they were softening a bit :)

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 21:24 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 2: Grounded (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mellais: How about equipment vs. the heat? How did for example the lenses handle it? Any damage? Thanks for an interesting article!

No damage. If you read the previous part you know that the drone wasn't as lucky ;)

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 19:50 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 2: Grounded (49 comments in total)
In reply to:

gordonpritchard: Any concern about the “ground” giving way and you falling into the lava?

I had an experienced local guide who kept me safe, so I had little concern.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 19:50 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 1: How to melt a drone (104 comments in total)
In reply to:

JimWiltschko: I entered the coordinates from the drone log into Google Earth and there’s no doubt you were on National Park land. In fact you were at the base of the Pali between two kipukas that cannot be mistaken for being outside the National Park. Either you were mislead or chose to ignore that you were violating the law. I take this hike twice a year when I visit the Big Island and was just there a few weeks ago.

@biggercountry, you need thick skin and a high tolerance for stupidity and ignorance if you're to be a professional artist of any kind, no doubt. For me it is indeed very worth it.
I just wish people wouldn't have this "I don't like the fact that you got these sweet shots so you're not allowed to do it!" attitude, it's so childish isn't it.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2017 at 22:33 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 1: How to melt a drone (104 comments in total)
In reply to:

JimWiltschko: I entered the coordinates from the drone log into Google Earth and there’s no doubt you were on National Park land. In fact you were at the base of the Pali between two kipukas that cannot be mistaken for being outside the National Park. Either you were mislead or chose to ignore that you were violating the law. I take this hike twice a year when I visit the Big Island and was just there a few weeks ago.

They always "know". They've always "been there" and are experts in the area.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2017 at 08:21 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 1: How to melt a drone (104 comments in total)
In reply to:

JimWiltschko: I entered the coordinates from the drone log into Google Earth and there’s no doubt you were on National Park land. In fact you were at the base of the Pali between two kipukas that cannot be mistaken for being outside the National Park. Either you were mislead or chose to ignore that you were violating the law. I take this hike twice a year when I visit the Big Island and was just there a few weeks ago.

Sigh...
https://imgur.com/a/w2ArD

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 21:50 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 1: How to melt a drone (104 comments in total)
In reply to:

ovlov: Pele got the last laugh.

Pele and DJI's lab ;)

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2017 at 22:51 UTC
On article Shooting Kīlauea Volcano, Part 1: How to melt a drone (104 comments in total)
In reply to:

matt1941: There is a shot where it looks there are 2 drones (one framinng the other)

The other was my friend's. We kept a good safety distance from each other :)

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2017 at 15:58 UTC
Total: 340, showing: 1 – 20
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