BJL

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Dec 17, 2002

Comments

Total: 250, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

J A C S: The 8mm is about 10% longer than the Canon 15mm, the same width and a few grams lighter only. More expensive and collects less light.

Similarly, the 7-14 is 23mm longer than the Canon 8-15; width and weight about the same, 1 stop less light, same price.

What happened to the portability of the m43 system?

"Cheaper - no. There are FF bodies for ~$1,200" and there are MFT bodies with EVF for $450 (E-M10). Or are you for some reason comparing the cheapest, superseded, end-of-life model in one format to the most expensive in another?

Link | Posted on May 13, 2015 at 02:04 UTC
On article Hands-on with new Olympus PRO 8mm and 7-14mm lenses (296 comments in total)
In reply to:

alatchin: Every time I read equivalence pop in such as the f 3.5 comment about the fisheye, you should always add "which in turn makes the ff biddy own like a m43s body. Otherwise you are just being misleading with only half the information... The half that makes a ff Ensor like a cure all for less light... Which is only true if you have a large physical aperture, not an equivalent aperture.

Every statement about f-stop equivalency should say something like "this f/1.8 MFT lens is 'equivalent' to a f/3.6 lens of twice the focal length used in 35mm format AT FOUR TIMES THE ISO SPEED", just case people forget to consider _that_ change into noise and IQ comparisons.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2015 at 01:53 UTC
In reply to:

snapa: Now, if they can only update the 3.5 year old sensor, they will really have something worthy of consideration. Changing body material, colors, firmware updates is nice, but... a new improved sensor would be even better, IMHO.

@mosc: why are you obsessed with limiting MFT resolution to what its slowest lens can handle at its slowest f-stop? And when you say "There is plenty of f2.8 m43 glass, it's just very expensive and large", you are thinking only of zoom lenses; there are plenty of MFT _prime_ lenses of f/2.8 or faster that are not particularly expensive and far from large: I love my 60/2.8 macro.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2015 at 01:45 UTC
In reply to:

nikkornikon: They Need to, Like Fuji...to Step away from 16mp. It is time to move on. When 24mp is truly old...16 seems freaking ancient.

@mosc, i agree; I am not really suggesting going to 80MP for the sake of the f/2.8 lenses! I am just saying that many existing MFT lenses can give a resolution/detail advantage from sensors going significantly beyond the current 16MP. I am a fan of the idea of mid-speed f/4 or f/2.8-f/4 zoom lenses, and if the diffraction limit the useful resolution from f/4 is about 40MP (as for the equivalent f/8 in 35mm), then other factors will probably set a limit between 16MP and than 40MP. Frankly, i would use 20MP+ mainly to crop for more telephoto reach than the lenses I prefer to carry.

P. S. Pixel sizes that give too much noise at high ISO speeds do not worry me either: so long as a "high res. low ISO" sensor can give nice highly detailed images at low to moderate ISO speeds, then higher ISO speeds can be handled by trading some of that resolution for noise control by downsampling or other noise reduction strategies, or there can be different models for people with different priorities.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2015 at 01:35 UTC
In reply to:

nikkornikon: They Need to, Like Fuji...to Step away from 16mp. It is time to move on. When 24mp is truly old...16 seems freaking ancient.

@ mosc: if as you say "F2.1 16mp 1/2.33" is not diffraction limited", then with the 4/3" format being over 3x larger, neither is f/6.3 16MP in 4/3", and so nor is f/5 24MP or f/2.8 80MP in 4/3" format -- the MP count for a similar level of diffraction effect goes up as the square of the f-stop and the square of the linear format size.

There is a bunch bunch of MFT lenses (including most MFT primes) offering f/2.8 or faster, and for them 16MP is a very long way from the point where a further increase in pixel count will stop giving further increase in detail due to diffraction effects when used wide open. And when these lenses need to be stopped down beyond f/2.8 for more DOF (the same DOF needs that require higher than f/5.6 in 35mm format), the diffraction limit for equal DOF sets the same MP limit for any format, due to the higher f-stop needed for equal DOF in a larger format.

Give as much resolution as the best lenses can handle, I say.

Link | Posted on May 13, 2015 at 00:11 UTC
In reply to:

nikkornikon: They Need to, Like Fuji...to Step away from 16mp. It is time to move on. When 24mp is truly old...16 seems freaking ancient.

@ 5inchfloppy: people have been saying that 4/3" format is at its limit since the original 5MP E-1 model! Meanwhile there are smaller 1" format sensors at 20MP in some Sony cameras and 18MP in some Nikon One models.

Diffraction is far from being a limy at 16MP for the faster MFT lenses. and why should bodies be limited to what benefits the slowest kit zooms?

Link | Posted on May 12, 2015 at 16:39 UTC
In reply to:

Ace of Sevens: So this is aimed at filmmakers, but has no 24 fps option?

It has all the usual frame rates from 23.98 to 60; the article only mentions 30FPS as the maximum with global shutter.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2015 at 20:22 UTC
In reply to:

M Jesper: I'm European, what's a 5lbs? ^.^

@Richard Butler: how about the sensor diagonal in mm? This is also used in the sensor industry, as in "diagonal 11mm" for type 2/3" format; see the Sony product list at http://www.datasheetcatalog.com/sony/44/

This conveys the information that most people want: a single number measure of (linear) sensor size, and in the units used by all but three nations in the world, plus many scientifically literate people in those three nations too.

(Some might complain about the different sensor shapes that can have the same diagonal length, but weirdness like 1/3.2" is no better on that score.)

Link | Posted on Mar 4, 2015 at 22:21 UTC
In reply to:

M Jesper: I'm European, what's a 5lbs? ^.^

@Rickard Hansson That gap from yard to miles is bizarre, but the US has a solution, in the form of two new units of measure often used in the news media: the "school bus" (about 20 meters) and the "football field" (about 100 meters.) I preferred the old-style chains and furlongs.

But its; not just the USA: last time I checked, Liberia and Myanmar were the other two official users of the old British style measures.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2015 at 17:50 UTC
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: Interestingly, Pentax representative said that they have already experimented with sensor shift technology to achieve same goal as this, now advertised by Olympus (and Hassy in the past). But, Pentax admits, the result is a large size dataset, plenty of megapickles, but the quality of the picture does not improve.
So instead of delivering that — which obviously is not difficult — they would rather focus how to make native resolution even better.

Which is interesting, as it better sheds light on what Olympus really wants to achieve: a perception that their small cameras (which are indeed limited by sensor size and performance worse that others), are also competitors when it comes to large image sizes.

HowAboutRAW: I was not disagreeing with what you said; my post just happened to appear after yours, but I was commenting on the thread as a whole.

Raist3D: I agree with your defense of Pentax as having made some innovations in the realm of IBIS: for example, using the IBIS motors as an optional moiré avoidance tool, in place of a low pass filter, is cool! But the early IBIS models from those two companies being mentioned mainly reflect that Olympus and Pentax both followed the IBIS lead of Konica-Minolta at about the same time, a years or two after K-M pioneered IBIS, so I would not get to excited about claiming either O or P as the great innovator on the basis of those 2006-2007 models.

Link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 16:16 UTC
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: Interestingly, Pentax representative said that they have already experimented with sensor shift technology to achieve same goal as this, now advertised by Olympus (and Hassy in the past). But, Pentax admits, the result is a large size dataset, plenty of megapickles, but the quality of the picture does not improve.
So instead of delivering that — which obviously is not difficult — they would rather focus how to make native resolution even better.

Which is interesting, as it better sheds light on what Olympus really wants to achieve: a perception that their small cameras (which are indeed limited by sensor size and performance worse that others), are also competitors when it comes to large image sizes.

HowaboutRAW: There was IBIS from the very first K-M DSLR, in 2005: http://www.dpreview.com/products/konicaminolta/slrs/konicaminolta_5d/specifications

What am I misconstruing? I am just stating some facts, along with my opinion that debates about finely-defined and minor points of tech history do not interest me very much!

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2015 at 21:40 UTC
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: Interestingly, Pentax representative said that they have already experimented with sensor shift technology to achieve same goal as this, now advertised by Olympus (and Hassy in the past). But, Pentax admits, the result is a large size dataset, plenty of megapickles, but the quality of the picture does not improve.
So instead of delivering that — which obviously is not difficult — they would rather focus how to make native resolution even better.

Which is interesting, as it better sheds light on what Olympus really wants to achieve: a perception that their small cameras (which are indeed limited by sensor size and performance worse that others), are also competitors when it comes to large image sizes.

It's strange that this sub-thread has wandered into a rather trivial debate about which company had what aspect of IBIS first. But since we are here:
Didn't Konica-Minolta have IBIS first, before either Olympus or Pentax? (Strange that the new owner Sony moved away from it for a while, but now is moving back!)

Anyway, I care far more about what various companies have now and are likely to provide in the foreseeable future, not who had what when in past. And on that front, Olympus and Pentax are between them doing the most interesting things with their "levitating sensors", so I am inclined to praise both, rather than pick nits with either.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2015 at 20:43 UTC
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: Interestingly, Pentax representative said that they have already experimented with sensor shift technology to achieve same goal as this, now advertised by Olympus (and Hassy in the past). But, Pentax admits, the result is a large size dataset, plenty of megapickles, but the quality of the picture does not improve.
So instead of delivering that — which obviously is not difficult — they would rather focus how to make native resolution even better.

Which is interesting, as it better sheds light on what Olympus really wants to achieve: a perception that their small cameras (which are indeed limited by sensor size and performance worse that others), are also competitors when it comes to large image sizes.

The OMD EM5 II multi-shot samples (at least some of them, at some sites) show a clear, substantial improvement in image detail over the single frame 16MP images, so why should we care that Pentax says that it was not able to achieve any significant IQ gains in its efforts? I am tempted to quote Aesop "Those grapes are sour anyway."

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2015 at 02:04 UTC
On article CP+ 2015: Canon shows off prototype 120MP CMOS sensor (255 comments in total)

1) Some commenters have missed Canon's description of that this sensor is for: "video production, monitoring, aviation, and space applications". So _not_ DSLR's. For some uses like wide-area security monitoring, aerial mapping and satellite-based surveillance, ever higher resolution is still sought.

2) The sensor size of about 30x20mm fits within the maximum field size of 33x26mm of all suitable IC fab. equipment, and so avoids the higher costs and lower yields of on-wafer stitching that everyone including Canon need to use when making sensors in sizes like 36x24mm and up. (Yes, Canon used to make a stepper capable of 50x50mm, but it had a minimum feature size of about 0.8 microns, too big for making SLR sensors.)

3) Sounds like Canon is finally implementing column-parallel ADC, as in Sony EXMOR etc.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 20:00 UTC as 24th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

TylerQ: I guess some people have no understanding how great film is. Given it's so called limitations, it's a wonder anyone ever took great photographs before the invention of digital sensors.
I remember shooting and not worrying about changing the iso, checking for image quality after each shot, doing a time lapse, 10-20 fps, etc. All those are just gimmicks.
Real photographers knew how to shoot photographs without all the so called "advantages" of digital cameras. You all should try it some time.

I can also happily leave my ISO speed setting at its minimum (as I almost always do in daylight shooting), I have never do time lapses and maybe use burst mode less than once a year, etc., etc.. So in what way do any of those additional options with digital relate to film being great? I do remember hauling several camera bodies on occasions where I wanted several film speeds, or wanted both color and monochrome; that was not so great.

It gets tiresome reading people pretend to be incapable of just using the features that they want on a camera and ignoring the rest, and making a vice out of more choice, and a virtue out of less choice.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2014 at 23:01 UTC
In reply to:

RichRMA: I saw used original 8mp digital Rebel DSLRs selling for $50 with chargers and batteries the other day. You can buy used 4-7mp point and shoots for $20 or less. Film is his-to-ry unless you have a specific need for the particular look it provides.

Isn't Kodak still making moving picture film in 8mm and 16mm format (having sold its _still_ film business) It is according to its website http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Products/Production/index.htm
unless that is out of date.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2014 at 22:52 UTC
In reply to:

RichRMA: I saw used original 8mp digital Rebel DSLRs selling for $50 with chargers and batteries the other day. You can buy used 4-7mp point and shoots for $20 or less. Film is his-to-ry unless you have a specific need for the particular look it provides.

Yes, MF and larger is the obvious prime territory for film. But what does this former maker of cheap store-brand films offer that Fujifilm, the remnants of Kodak, and Ilford do not?

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2014 at 20:50 UTC
In reply to:

bossnas: To all of the people that claim digital photography is so cheap, did your computer, software and hard-drives for backing up all come free with the camera? If they did, tell me where I too can get them. Thanks.

- My $80 1TB backup drives each holds over 50,000 photos, so less than 1c per image even when I keep two copies on separate drives, internal and external.
- I have a computer anyway for many other purposes, so photography at most requires $50-$100 worth of extra disk space, counted above.
- A great many photographers use free software, like the stuff that comes with every camera or the stuff bundled with many computers. Even those of who buy software pay far less for that than for films and processing: my photographic software expenses have been about $200 over the last few years, comparable to the film and processing costs of about a few hundred photos, but I have instead taken thousands in that time.

So the costs for most digital photographers are far, far less than with film.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2014 at 20:47 UTC
On article Sony shows off upcoming full-frame lenses at Photokina (336 comments in total)
In reply to:

marco1974: OK, so now we finally will have a 35/1.4... but it'll be the same size as the 24-240 superzoom! So much for the mirrorless advantage in terms of size and weight.
But oh, wait: we also have the more compact 35/2.8, don't we? But then the DOF and the total light-gathering ability is the same as that of a 23/2 on APS-c (which could obviously be much more compact to begin with). So much for the FF advantage in terms of DOF and ISO.
Mmmh, it seems that in spite of marketing claims, one just can't beat the laws of physics. Bummer.

Low f-stop wide angle lenses can be small because their effective aperture diameters arre still small (focal length divided by aperture ratio). But that is not where shallow DOF is most often sought, and the iron rule remains: shallower DOF at a given angular FOV comes from larger effective aperture diameters, not format size alone. And bigger aperture diameters require bigger, heaver front elements.

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2014 at 14:40 UTC
On article Rare Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USM goes on sale in UK (218 comments in total)
In reply to:

Omexis: Anyone know who previously owned this lens? and no comments about perverts, CIA, MI5/6 or someone with a inferiority complex.

I've read that Sports Illustrated was a major customer (meaning they bought more than one): the AF is what distinguished this lens from any number of 1200MM or longer alternatives.

The custom lens for photographing falcons in Qatar or whatever was the far larger Zeiss 1700mm f/4 for a Hasselblad F series body; #3 on this list: http://www.wexphotographic.com/blog/top-10-outrageous-lenses

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2014 at 21:17 UTC
Total: 250, showing: 41 – 60
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