h2k

Lives in Germany Southern Bavaria, Germany
Works as a Write, edit, translate, photog, video tutorials
Joined on Apr 14, 2009
About me:

Writer, editor, translator, photographer, video tutorial producer, in English and German, based in Germany.

Interested in assignments. See link here to my English website.

Comments

Total: 567, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Mister Joseph: Lack of flippy touchscreen REALLY cripples the a6300 with its nice all-frame AF points!

I also don't know why Sony doesn't offer touch screens. I thought it would seem in line with their image and type of cameras. I am fully used to touch screens and find them gorgeous.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2016 at 06:41 UTC
In reply to:

left eye: Would you prefer to read this in the standard DPR article format?
- which in the case of a short article would be on one or two pages.

Or do you like this format - photos with short annotations and *lots* of click-through buttons?

To be quite frank I'm getting annoyed by DPR increasingly using this click-through format, I prefer scrolling up and down articles.

Apologies if this article format 'vs' seems off-topic.

I've also said several times that i dislike the click-click-click format.

I was then told by readers that i could continue reading with the arrow keys instead of clicking on screen buttons. The arrow keys do make things a bit easier, but still on each new page again i have to scroll down to get to the text (and i have to re-concentrate).

And yes, i do "click" a few hundred times to write this reply, but i don't have to change page after page and re-concentrate to do so.

I still very much like most of DPRs content, and i (have to) accept anything here, but i will not read some of the content that's presented in click-click-click format which i might have read in a "longread" format.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2016 at 06:38 UTC
On article 6 tips for better wildflower photos (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gray Photography: Great tips. Too bad you published them a month or two after the flowers bloomed. Timeliness is everything boys and girls.

"On top of that, they bloom all year around near the equator, and Spring is approaching in regions even further South."
--
Thought so too. OP is very my-region-centric.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2016 at 07:47 UTC
On article Photoshop CC 2015.5.1 available (89 comments in total)
In reply to:

John Tannock: The bugs are included with your subscription whether you want them or not, or at least that's what a subscriber has told me. By that I assume that you're programs are upgraded automatically, correct? That being the case, I'll stick with my nice, stable CS6/LR6. Adobe seems to be using its customer base as their beta testers.

"I assume that you're programs are upgraded automatically, correct?"
---
Just 1of several wrong statements/assumptions in this comments section.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2016 at 22:37 UTC
On article Photoshop CC 2015.5.1 available (89 comments in total)
In reply to:

jabilson007: Ok, I am still not sure why select and mask has to be a new workspace. I liked the pop-up panel of refine edge. I think they should have just added the new features to it. Refine edge was quicker to use also.

"Ok, I am still not sure why select and mask has to be a new workspace. I liked the pop-up panel of refine edge."
---
Same here.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2016 at 22:33 UTC
On article Lensbaby Twist 60 real-world sample gallery (98 comments in total)

Quite a showcase for this unusual lens.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2016 at 21:19 UTC as 52nd comment
In reply to:

h2k: Now expecting an interview, i didn't expect in the least this awkward multi-click format. I find this user-unfriendly to a high degree (aware that many on-site clicks may be good for DPR).

I thought this could be interesting content, but i can't bring myself to click-click-click through this.

I know at least one great website of a major general weekly that breaks its stories into 2 - 3 pages - with the additional option of reading everything on one single page. Possible at DPR?

Hi, thanks for your comments. I want to say that i still think DPR is a phantastic website, one that taught me more than perhaps any other, and with very unobtrusive advertising. Actually, i thought that in many ways DPR seems so reasonable and down-to-earth that the click-click-click format of this article seems even more surprising (while i'd never had commented it on a more average site).

And thanks for the hint, i hadn't been aware of the left-right cursors' usefulness. Shame on me. This makes things somewhat better, still i'd prefer to read stuff on long pages, it seems certainly more practical especially on wide-screen monitors (not turned up to portrait orientation).

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 19:33 UTC

Now expecting an interview, i didn't expect in the least this awkward multi-click format. I find this user-unfriendly to a high degree (aware that many on-site clicks may be good for DPR).

I thought this could be interesting content, but i can't bring myself to click-click-click through this.

I know at least one great website of a major general weekly that breaks its stories into 2 - 3 pages - with the additional option of reading everything on one single page. Possible at DPR?

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2016 at 17:31 UTC as 54th comment | 15 replies
On article Microsoft Pix aims to capture better people pictures (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

FBoneOne: I just wonder what's in it for Microsoft? Get gps coordinates of all pictures to send location relevant advertising in real time? Something does not add up, they must have a way to make money here that is not exactly obvious.

" Something does not add up, they must have a way to make money here that is not exactly obvious."
---
Suspicions in that line creep up more often when i see new software advertised. The more enthusiastically it is praised, the more creepy.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2016 at 11:52 UTC
On article Microsoft Pix aims to capture better people pictures (56 comments in total)

Never heard of that start-up "Microsoft", but i'd certainly not let them select or frame my best photos.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2016 at 04:14 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

h2k: Would have liked to know more about weather sealing and shookproofing, which both also interest photography-minded mobile users.

Of course any information about the upcoming grip would be great as well.

Lars, thanks. And sorry for the iPhone. (Maybe stick with Lenovo?)

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 15:07 UTC
On article Top tips for composing great landscapes (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: To me, your white signature on dark background is the dominant (or at least a major) visual component of nearly every one of these images -- it seriously degrades the compositions. If you insist on marking each image, I'd strongly suggest making it a more subtle watermark, using tones more consistent with those of the area upon which you impose it.

"it simply shows just how many people here are jealous of the work and publication Chris is getting, and that they are too cowardly or lazy to find anything original to whine about themselves. Chances are they believe they are "above" this sort of tutorial, and think that they paint themselves as the "educator" when they point out arbitrary things"
---
Sharp analysis.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 12:12 UTC

Would have liked to know more about weather sealing and shookproofing, which both also interest photography-minded mobile users.

Of course any information about the upcoming grip would be great as well.

Link | Posted on Jul 26, 2016 at 12:09 UTC as 19th comment | 3 replies
On article Top tips for composing great landscapes (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: To me, your white signature on dark background is the dominant (or at least a major) visual component of nearly every one of these images -- it seriously degrades the compositions. If you insist on marking each image, I'd strongly suggest making it a more subtle watermark, using tones more consistent with those of the area upon which you impose it.

I find both parallels to audio listening not entirely fitting here:
- listening for tape hiss
- listening to a 10 sec stop with copyright announcement

But i do like the audio analogy. Maybe the best parallel would be the station identifaction jingles, that some private radio stations blend into the songs they play. These jingles are made to blend inobtrusively into the music (of course they disturb anyway), but I'd say the logo for the landscape photos would be like such a station identification layover, only by accident a too harsh one.

On a side note, tape hiss does annoy me.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2016 at 16:43 UTC
On article Top tips for composing great landscapes (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: To me, your white signature on dark background is the dominant (or at least a major) visual component of nearly every one of these images -- it seriously degrades the compositions. If you insist on marking each image, I'd strongly suggest making it a more subtle watermark, using tones more consistent with those of the area upon which you impose it.

"If you can't look past a simple logo, then you're probably not the target audience here."
--
I personally think it could be just the other way round:

If an obtrusive logo *doesn't* disturb you in an otherwise lovely image, then you're probably not the target audience here.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2016 at 10:14 UTC
On article Top tips for composing great landscapes (127 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: To me, your white signature on dark background is the dominant (or at least a major) visual component of nearly every one of these images -- it seriously degrades the compositions. If you insist on marking each image, I'd strongly suggest making it a more subtle watermark, using tones more consistent with those of the area upon which you impose it.

Agreed as well.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2016 at 18:56 UTC
On article Second Time Around: Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II Review (288 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alastair Norcross: A mostly fair review, but I find the complaints about JPEG image quality rather funny, and silly. Does the reviewer not know that JPEG noise reduction can be turned down or up in the camera? Or that sharpness levels can be controlled with multiple settings on no fewer than three parameters? The G7XII is an advanced compact camera. To complain about the default settings, when these can and should be varied considerably is pointless. Other than that, as I said, a pretty fair review. It's a really excellent compact camera, and an ideal everyday and travel companion.
I also find it strange that much attention at all is paid to JPEG image quality on an advanced camera such as the G7XII. If you buy this camera, you probably care about image quality. If you care about image quality, you probably shoot RAW. Given that the G7XII has very useful, and quite fast, in-camera RAW processing, there's really not much reason to shoot JPEG.

"Either I got that grain or an image that was too soft all over."
---
This sounds disturbing. Can't Canon provide any useful JPEG setting at all?

From other Canon compacts, i quite liked their well-rounded JPEGs.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2016 at 11:19 UTC
On article Second Time Around: Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II Review (288 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alastair Norcross: A mostly fair review, but I find the complaints about JPEG image quality rather funny, and silly. Does the reviewer not know that JPEG noise reduction can be turned down or up in the camera? Or that sharpness levels can be controlled with multiple settings on no fewer than three parameters? The G7XII is an advanced compact camera. To complain about the default settings, when these can and should be varied considerably is pointless. Other than that, as I said, a pretty fair review. It's a really excellent compact camera, and an ideal everyday and travel companion.
I also find it strange that much attention at all is paid to JPEG image quality on an advanced camera such as the G7XII. If you buy this camera, you probably care about image quality. If you care about image quality, you probably shoot RAW. Given that the G7XII has very useful, and quite fast, in-camera RAW processing, there's really not much reason to shoot JPEG.

Well, one would have liked to know:
- Can sharpening and noise reduction be turned down indeed and how does it affect iq?
- In camera raw processing working on *batches*?

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2016 at 21:02 UTC
On article Behind the shot: Praia da Adraga at blue hour (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

solarider: More than a small amount of effort can go into an image. Thank you for you detailing your process.

Agreed.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2016 at 14:27 UTC
On article A photographer's intro to the world of video (100 comments in total)

Nice down-to-earth beginners' primer.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2016 at 19:08 UTC as 28th comment | 1 reply
Total: 567, showing: 1 – 20
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