koolbreez

koolbreez

Lives in Thailand Bangkok, Thailand
Works as a Photojournalist
Joined on Sep 29, 2010

Comments

Total: 52, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

lightandaprayer: The New York Times has been paying its stringers peanuts for decades. It's been paying $200 for many years, even back in the day when its profit margin was the envy of corporate America. Now it raises the day rate to $400, as if that is a lot of money in 2017.

Incredible. . .

Most newspapers go with payment on images used, and they can be pretty low. There are lots of media "day rates" under $200, when day rates are actually contracted and paid.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 07:33 UTC
In reply to:

Arkienkeli: Good news for freelance photographers, but it would be interesting to know what they pay their staff reporters and editors, and staff photographers (if there are any left).

Even then $400/day is amazingly low considering that one has to pay all gear costs, health care, insurances, taxes, vacation time etc etc out of that, and work is not guaranteed every day. Even where I live where salaries for professional people are 50-80% lower than in the US a staff photographer makes the same or more considering the extras (same pay scales for both writers and photographers), such as free health care and complete gear kit thrown in, not to mention 7 weeks of annual holiday at 150% raised pay...

Most everything you listed is tax deductible, if in fact you actually pay taxes....lolol. I was making $400 a day 8 years ago, and am now making a tad bit more than that, working when I want to.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 07:18 UTC

PopPhoto started going downhill when they started limiting their lens reviews, and quit comparing competing brands making the same sized lens. They also took most of their lens database offline so readers couldn't compare different brands.

I used them extensively before that point in my lens buying decisions, but then they started going to extremes in sendom bought products, making different brand quality comparisons impossible. That is when I quit buying the mag, because at that point it became useless. Their lens reviews were the only thing unique and trusted about the mag, and why many people, both amature, and professional bought the mag. With that feature compromised there was no longer any point in the purchase.

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 14:31 UTC as 92nd comment | 1 reply
On article SanDisk 1TB SDXC card prototype unveiled at Photokina (109 comments in total)

Just think about how long it would take to back this full card up, and what you would back it up to. This does no good for the semi-pro, except as a backup device itself. This has promise as soon as it is in Micro-SD format, and can be put in a cell phone, as the bulk of cell phone picture shooters never backup their photos, and just delete old ones when the card fills up and they want to take new shots. A 1tb card would make them very happy. For a pro though, this is a waste.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 10:33 UTC as 13th comment
On article Getty Images asks court to throw out $1B lawsuit (97 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: This sounds less like a Shakespeare or Dickens situation (both of whom have obviously been dead for well over a century), and much more like the Warner / Chappell "Happy Birthday" lawsuit, where the company falsified claims of ownership for works that were already public domain since 1927. That company now owes $14M to each of the licensees that had been paying Warner / Chappell for the use of the song.

Getty might have had a leg to stand on if they had just acted as if they were selling prints or convenient digital downloads of the image from their well-trafficked websites, but the fact that Highsmith supposedly first found out about Getty's use of the image was when they sent her a bill for the image found on her very own website, meaning that they were actively and unlawfully defending and billing for copyright that they did not own...

This is the basic point of her case, and why she will win. She did not get the image from any of Getty's affiliates, or from Getty themselves. She got the image from her own archive. Getty, in trying to charge her for usage, is in fact claiming that the image ceased to be public domain after they made claim to it, and attempted to charge her for usage. If Getty recognized the image as public domain they would not have attempted to charge her after she acquired the image from somewhere other than Getty, or any of their business partners. This amounts to Getty refusing to recognize the images as public domain, and in fact shows clearly they were claiming them as their own. Her image that she used had absolutely no identifying file title, or mark, whether visual, or digitally hidden, showing she acquired the image from Getty. She will win.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 07:45 UTC

Just as any media publication is biased towards their advertisers, this move by Getty into the commercialization of the news will promote that bias. This move started a few years ago with the push to feature news pictures with commercial logos in the background aimed at primary picture sales to those brands, with the actual editorial news as secondary. Think of this model as sponsored news, with nothing published that might be considered detrimental to the sponsor. A Monsanto sponsored news cast would not cover a demonstration against GMOs, instead it would promote a bug falling dead off a GMO modified cotton plant. Individual publications have always been biased when considering their advertisers, and their political alignment, but with this news commercialisation it takes it to an international level, giving no chance of individual bias on the local level, other than to not buy and publish the story, and photographs, with clear product branding.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 04:32 UTC as 6th comment
In reply to:

Dr_Jon: So they claim it's "usual" for them to distribute Public Domain images, okay that's fine, however you can't sell a licence to them so their site shouldn't have said that, you can just charge a handling fee. (If you have glacial internet there are people you can pay to send you a linux distribution burnt onto a DVD, for example.) Also if it's standard practice for them to do this, how come they don't have a mechanism to stop their legal people chasing after other users of the images? Having such a mechanism and showing this image fell down a procedural hole might work as a mitigating factor, but you'd have thought they would have mentioned it much sooner after the big number was mentioned...

BTW the last time they got done for this was $1.5M IIRC, so maybe treble that this time as a repeat offender? Obviously $1B is jut silly, just they presumably caused her a lot of stress by setting the lawyers on her, so doing the same to their execs by waving around 10-digit numbers seems fair.

Actually $1B is not silly. Under copyright law, and her images were copyrighted, punitive damages can be calculated at 3 times monetary damages. Getty is charged with over $468+million in statutory damages for charging for use of the 18,755 free images, including trying to charge her, the owner of the copyright, and how she became aware of Getty charging for her free pictures, a clear violation of her copyright. Because they lost a previous copyright infringement case, these damages can be tripled, bringing damages over $1B. It would be interesting to learn how many other free images from the Library of Congress they are charging licencing fees for. I doubt if this is an isolated case.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2016 at 12:02 UTC
On article Corbis Images content to be distributed by Getty (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

MyReality: Wow! Look at all the whining and crying happen in these posts. Where are the violins?
Photographers have to be invited to join Getty. Getty does not force anyone to sign a contract. Their contract is available to read online.
They are like any large company that wants to consolidate. They are not breaking any laws.
If you don't like their contract, don't sign. I have heard these kinds of comments before on this forum. Does anyone here believe in free will?
If you don't like the amount of your commission, sell thru a different outlet
Have a nice day?.

Actually if they had bought Corbis without going through VCG they would have been breaking laws in a number of countries. Being the sole distributor of Corbis content outside China, they circumvented anti-monopoly laws.

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2016 at 07:03 UTC
On article Here at last: Nikon announces D500 (1174 comments in total)

The plus factors for me are the huge buffer, the ruggedness of the body, the iso range, if noise is well controlled, tilt screen, and the frame rate.

The negatives are no pop-up flash, no extra crop factor like the D7100, smaller sensor pixel count, but this might help in controlling noise, the weight, short video record times, with the movie industry still forcing short record times so people can't use it to pirate movies, no 120fps or 240fps at 1080p, touch screen is a big hassle most of the time, except in some live view instances. card slot choices, as only the SDcard side is a standard format, and price.

If the price drops below the US$1500 mark maybe I'll buy, but not at US$2000. Can not justify that much as a new business expense, given all the other choices for cheaper.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 02:24 UTC as 159th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

koolbreez: You are all missing the reason for this, to speed up submissions. In this very competitive field speed of submission is extremely critical, and the time it takes to process RAW files greatly hinders submission time. Plenty of cameras now offer the ability to send pictures directly from camera via wifi, and do minor post processing of the JGP, but they do not offer the ability to in-camera post process RAW files. Reuters is just trying to get it across to their extensive list of freelancers that anything to speed up the submission process must be incorporated into their workflow. As most freelancers are under the impression that RAW files are best, they have to be forcefully trained to break that frame of thought, when "best" is not a priority in breaking news photography. JGPs meet the OOC quality requirements just fine, and the difference of minutes, and seconds, in submission speed can make the difference between a sale, or no sale, and that is what it is all about.

You shoot RAW with your quattro, and in-camera post process, and I'll shoot JPG, and we'll see who's image hits the editor's desk first, and makes the sale....lolol. Just saying:-)

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 03:15 UTC
In reply to:

dkirk7000: Oh I had a pulitzer winning shot but I underexposed it by two stops and can't recover the image in jpeg.

That is actually the most critical factor, how fast you can get the image submitted, in terms of whether you make a sale, or not. The breaking news business is judged in minutes, and seconds, as to whether your picture is chosen over someone else's submission on the same event, and be assured, everyone has a camera. It just takes the pro-photojournalist less time to get their submission into the picture editors.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 03:10 UTC
In reply to:

Great Bustard: You know, if you have that little trust in your photographers, then...

You are spot on Mark. This is all about speed of submission, and making breaking news image sales. I am an editor for another major breaking news wire service, and the first images in get the push. The rest after that must be unique, and technically perfect in order to be sent out.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 03:01 UTC
In reply to:

Don Kiyoti: This is clearly about the growing problem of some unethical photographers altering the content of their images by adding or deleting elements. There have been some well-publicized cases of this happening. Sometimes it's to "improve" the image by removing something distracting but otherwise unimportant. In other cases it's been to make the image tell a different story, and that's what Reuters can't tolerate.

Despite the wording of the announcement, this has nothing to do with speed. It's all about the integrity of the scene.

No, this is about the time it takes to submit the picture, nothing else. Time is a critical factor in breaking news picture sales, and post processing RAW files slows down the submission time, no matter how efficient the work flow, in a business where minutes, and seconds count, between a sale, or no sale.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 02:54 UTC
In reply to:

Raist3d: I love how several people seem to know better about this domain of photography than Reuters along with their reasons ;-)

This isn't about picture integrity, that is universally understood by photojournalists. This is about speed of submission only, and getting rid of the time it takes to post process RAW files, no matter how efficient the post processing is, speeding up the submission time. That is all this is about, nothing else. The faster the image is submitted, the better chance of a sale in this highly competitive field.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 02:48 UTC
In reply to:

DStudio: In the PetaPixel article Reuters cites the extra time photographers take on editing RAW images. And they're correct - it is often a waste of time when news-gathering - even when the photographer has an efficient RAW workflow.

However, that's the *photographer's* problem to solve, not theirs. I guess their liberal mindset (the bad side of it) is showing through here. They want to solve someone else's problems. And they will do so by mandating "the correct solution" for them.

It's good for Reuters to manage their workflows. But it's dubious to dictate the freelance photographer's workflow for him. I don't mind them specifying the types of edits allowed, but it's dubious when they get their fingers into the photographer's pie, dictating the original image format.

You are all missing the whole point of what Reuters said. This is being done strictly as a time saver in getting the submission to Reuters, nothing else. There is a time delay when a photographer has to post process a RAW file, no matter how efficient their workflow is, and that delay is costing sales in this highly competitive field, where minutes, and seconds are how submission times are judged. This is about breaking news photography, of which Reuters is a major player, not fine art, or feature photojournalism. Every freelancer accepted by Reuters knows the edit restrictions, but they are still holding to their post processing of RAW files, so Reuters has to break that way of thinking, as it is costing sales. That is simply what this is all about. It is not about picture integrity from their freelancers, as that is universally understood. It is about getting their pictures to Reuters faster.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 02:43 UTC
In reply to:

MiraShootsNikon: I bet Reuters is really trying to say, in a "Minnesota-nice" sorta way, that they've been getting a bunch of *TERRIBLY* over-cooked images baked from RAW.

You know: "Hey, why not just keep it to JPEGs and a small adjustment-or-two with the ol' Photoshop levels panel, okey?" is passive-aggressive code for "If we receive ONE more craptastic HDR-wannabe image with ACR-Lightroom Shadows slammed to 100 and Highlights yanked all the way down, our editors will have a collective coronary."

No, they are actually trying to say you are spending too much time processing your RAW files, and it is costing us sales. OOC JGPs can be submitted much faster, and speed of submission is the most critical factor in the breaking news business of photojournalism, of which Reuters is a major player.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 02:30 UTC

You are all missing the reason for this, to speed up submissions. In this very competitive field speed of submission is extremely critical, and the time it takes to process RAW files greatly hinders submission time. Plenty of cameras now offer the ability to send pictures directly from camera via wifi, and do minor post processing of the JGP, but they do not offer the ability to in-camera post process RAW files. Reuters is just trying to get it across to their extensive list of freelancers that anything to speed up the submission process must be incorporated into their workflow. As most freelancers are under the impression that RAW files are best, they have to be forcefully trained to break that frame of thought, when "best" is not a priority in breaking news photography. JGPs meet the OOC quality requirements just fine, and the difference of minutes, and seconds, in submission speed can make the difference between a sale, or no sale, and that is what it is all about.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 02:18 UTC as 45th comment | 4 replies

Why do they never post the battery life? That is the biggest determining factor with most action cam purchases. Are they doubling up frames at 60fps, as most do, or is it true 60fps. The average user does not need 4K video, or anything above 1080P for that matter, plus consumers love real 120fps, or higher, for slow motion at the same resolution.

If they want to regain market share they are slowly loosing, then serious battery life technology needs to be implimented. When they can top 3 hours of battery life then I might spend the extra money to buy their products, but as it stands now there are too many comparable action cams for a lot less money, and some with much better battery life. A plug-in power bank add-on would be nice, at say 5000mha.

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2015 at 02:31 UTC as 7th comment

They are solely using video, which is low resolution. It will be much more practical when they develop it to use still high resolution images, as Adobe has already made advances in.

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2015 at 04:28 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply

The high guide number makes this a very bright unit when stopped down to 1/32nd, 1/64th, and the 1/128th settings to stop motion, making extreme closeness of shooting not a problem when the flash is stopped down to take advantage of the 20,000th of a second motion stopping capabilities.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 02:27 UTC as 7th comment
Total: 52, showing: 1 – 20
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