PhotoKhan

Lives in Portugal Cascais, Portugal
Works as a Airline pilot
Joined on Mar 22, 2003
About me:

A good photograph shows what you saw.
A superior ones conveys what you felt.

Comments

Total: 911, showing: 101 – 120
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On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: So, basically, what this German consumer should really be complaining is that Apple does not comply with Bluetooth open standards, making pretty much life difficult for their users and brand's software developers.

By slowing turning this logic on things - it is now the "outside world" that has to comply with "walled-garden" approaches such has crippled Bluetooth - Apple users are slowly starting to crystallize their spoiled-brat-everyone-must-do-what-I-want attitudes, I see.

(cont.)

That it works badly is a case for tech support. That it recurrently works badly up to the point if being unusable, that's grounds for ANOTHER judicial claim, one clearly contemplated in European Consumer Law: Through recurrent inoperability, the device is not fit for the particular function (full file transfer) it was sold for.

The second complaint (...and the one I feel is the real issue)?

That "the labels on the box indicating compatibility with Apple devices implied the function was already available to users of such devices", as CLEARLY written on the piece.

This has a legal leg to stand on, because Nikon has formally advertised a functionality that isn't already implemented.

Still, it is so easily demonstrable that it doesn't need to track a judicial course of action.

(cont.)

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2016 at 09:51 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: So, basically, what this German consumer should really be complaining is that Apple does not comply with Bluetooth open standards, making pretty much life difficult for their users and brand's software developers.

By slowing turning this logic on things - it is now the "outside world" that has to comply with "walled-garden" approaches such has crippled Bluetooth - Apple users are slowly starting to crystallize their spoiled-brat-everyone-must-do-what-I-want attitudes, I see.

(cont.)

So, conceptually, SnapBridge is a solution designed to:

1. Allow "always-on" file transfer via a low power consumption channel.

2. Allow for Wi-Fi transfers by positive action of the user, as with any other Wi-Fi file transfer solution.

3. "Force-invite" the use of Nikon's hosting platform.

Currently, it seems that this tech option is being badly implemented and is having some operational problems but this has nothing to with the concept.

This German consumer will be hard-pressed making any European judicial system act on his behalf because one of the things he his claiming - that the he expects Wi-Fi to be used has it was with his D7200 - is, in fact, specified in the implemented solution.

(cont.)

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2016 at 09:50 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: So, basically, what this German consumer should really be complaining is that Apple does not comply with Bluetooth open standards, making pretty much life difficult for their users and brand's software developers.

By slowing turning this logic on things - it is now the "outside world" that has to comply with "walled-garden" approaches such has crippled Bluetooth - Apple users are slowly starting to crystallize their spoiled-brat-everyone-must-do-what-I-want attitudes, I see.

Bluetooth LE was merged with core Bluetooth in 2010. It is now a part of Bluetooth Core Specification since Version 4.0, in 2010.

There's no resident Wi-Fi implementation in cameras that I know of that don't need an application in the destination device. My Canons have one and the Nikons also surely do.

What Nikon has done is use a Bluetooth "helping hand" of any device (...and I don't know a single device that has Wi-Fi that does not also feature Bluetooth...) for the whole connection to happen and to allow for an "always-on-low-consumption" solution for streaming low-res images.

The Wi-Fi transfer functionality is still available (although it must be enabled through SnapBridge, the mentioned always required app, for this particular case).

(cont.)

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2016 at 09:50 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: So, basically, what this German consumer should really be complaining is that Apple does not comply with Bluetooth open standards, making pretty much life difficult for their users and brand's software developers.

By slowing turning this logic on things - it is now the "outside world" that has to comply with "walled-garden" approaches such has crippled Bluetooth - Apple users are slowly starting to crystallize their spoiled-brat-everyone-must-do-what-I-want attitudes, I see.

You really need to read the piece again...

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 22:22 UTC
On article D500 owner formally accuses Nikon of false advertising (475 comments in total)

So, basically, what this German consumer should really be complaining is that Apple does not comply with Bluetooth open standards, making pretty much life difficult for their users and brand's software developers.

By slowing turning this logic on things - it is now the "outside world" that has to comply with "walled-garden" approaches such has crippled Bluetooth - Apple users are slowly starting to crystallize their spoiled-brat-everyone-must-do-what-I-want attitudes, I see.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2016 at 12:57 UTC as 21st comment | 15 replies
On article Hasselblad to announce 'game changer' next week (460 comments in total)
In reply to:

Marty4650: I just hope this won't be another Sony NEX-7, rebadged as a Hassleblad.

And selling for $7,500....

The article says they abandoned that marketing plan, but you never know. They might do something similar with a twist.

Wait.... maybe this time it will be a rebadged Sony A7R II, selling for $12,000?

No. They backtracked in full.
It's a rebadged Leica SL for $1000.

Link | Posted on Jun 17, 2016 at 21:49 UTC

...Yes, but does it do Macro?

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 18:14 UTC as 80th comment | 2 replies

Being as equivocated (...to put it gently...) as a large part of their user base might be, one thing is for sure: Leica, themselves, DO know Photography.

There is not one single uninteresting, redundant portfolio in this shortlist.

Picking the winner will not be an easy task.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2016 at 05:53 UTC as 26th comment
On article Apple Photos gets smarter in iOS 10, macOS 'Sierra' (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

Clint Dunn: I've been using Mac for 7 years now and to this day never use iPhoto. I tried it for 10 mins years ago and was turned off by the fact it doesn't allow you to determine your own folder structure. No, Apple...you do not know better than me how to organize my own workflow.

Having an Apple user baffled over how Apple forces him to do or not do something is like having an gazelle baffled that a lion just bit his hindquarter after what he thought was a in-tandem reinvigorating morning run across the savanna.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2016 at 09:42 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: I can see what the concerns might be, yes...

It is a pity though because this must be one of the most important tools ever developed for traveling.

I can't express enough how this Google tool helped us on the other side of the globe, in Japan, a country where English is not very common and the cultural idiosyncrasies take a bit to get used to (...things like the door numbering in a block, for instance...).

I will be forever in awe over how we went to a Okonomiyaki place in Tokyo with very good reviews, buried deep in the streets mesh of Harajuku area and were able to do so directly, as if we had lived there forever, courtesy of just a previous "sortie" made with Street View.

If these security concerns spread we will be loosing a great tool and the fanatics, once more, step up another notch curtailing our freedom.

Yes, because in India no one, including both foreigners and locals, use smartphones... ;)

This has a leg to stand on because Street View allows for REMOTE intelligence gathering (...at the expense of currentness...) and, as such, blocking it actually achieves something.

The more general, in-loco image gathering denial is a farce that only accomplishes being a nuisance for photographers and a good political crutch for those in power when something happens (..."we didn't even allowed cameras there"...).

The reply from Bilbao's Guggenheim Museum management when I pointed out to them, in writing, that an horde of people using smartphones were not complying with their "no cameras" policy, supposedly aimed at security and intellectual property protection, would have been hilarious was it not for the fact that it was so impotently and illogically sad.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2016 at 15:36 UTC

I can see what the concerns might be, yes...

It is a pity though because this must be one of the most important tools ever developed for traveling.

I can't express enough how this Google tool helped us on the other side of the globe, in Japan, a country where English is not very common and the cultural idiosyncrasies take a bit to get used to (...things like the door numbering in a block, for instance...).

I will be forever in awe over how we went to a Okonomiyaki place in Tokyo with very good reviews, buried deep in the streets mesh of Harajuku area and were able to do so directly, as if we had lived there forever, courtesy of just a previous "sortie" made with Street View.

If these security concerns spread we will be loosing a great tool and the fanatics, once more, step up another notch curtailing our freedom.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2016 at 12:14 UTC as 30th comment | 3 replies
On article Setting new standards: Nikon D5 Review (522 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Franiec: I'm still thinking if the old approach not to review the flagships from Nikon and Canon was not the right approach?
Who actually benefits from such reviews? Pro photographers and the handful of enthusiasts who actually don't care about the findings?
The resources spent on reviewing these complex cameras could be spent better by directing the attention to the mainstream gear.
A few people who ask for such review will likely never buy the equipment. On the other hand, it is commendable that DPReview takes all the wishes regarding gear review so seriously that they will review any gear there is to avoid the criticism of the readership, no matter how small it can be.

(cont.)

"I'm still thinking if the old approach not to review the flagships from BMW and Mercedes was not the right approach?

Who actually benefits from such reviews? Some rich people and the handful of enthusiasts who actually might care about the findings?

The resources spent on reviewing these complex machines could be spent better by directing the attention to mainstream cars.

A few people who ask for such review will likely never buy those models.

On the other hand, it is commendable that DPReview takes all the wishes regarding cars review so seriously that they will review any car there is to avoid the criticism of the readership, no matter how small it can be."

See how strange it sounds?

All the best.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2016 at 11:24 UTC
On article Setting new standards: Nikon D5 Review (522 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Franiec: I'm still thinking if the old approach not to review the flagships from Nikon and Canon was not the right approach?
Who actually benefits from such reviews? Pro photographers and the handful of enthusiasts who actually don't care about the findings?
The resources spent on reviewing these complex cameras could be spent better by directing the attention to the mainstream gear.
A few people who ask for such review will likely never buy the equipment. On the other hand, it is commendable that DPReview takes all the wishes regarding gear review so seriously that they will review any gear there is to avoid the criticism of the readership, no matter how small it can be.

Richard,

A site dedicated to any consumer items should be so engaged in those products as to be willing to review any offer in any segment.

If the writers and editorial staff really love photography, there's no way they won't be excited to test and review the top offers from any brand.

This has been my case in the past, when they failed to do so.

So that you understand my POV, I took the liberty of slightly changing your own commentary for illustration purposes:

(cont.)

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2016 at 11:24 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Novoflex clearly has failed to read the Leica crowd.
They could very well be asking $999 for it....better still, they could have gone with an agreement with Leica over it, slapped a red dot and ask $1,599 for the darn thing.

Well, black and white DO exist...With a lot of shades in-between.

Then, there's color, with its wonderfully, almost infinite pallets.

Like it or not, there's a significant number of Leica owners that own them for status, for the sheer price of the brand's products. If the exact same gear was available for 1/4 of the price (...which, in many cases, would still make them bad price/performance proposals...), they wouldn't touch them with a 10-yards pole.

If I told you a surreal experience I once had, first-hand, with one of those users, you would be hard-pressed believing it happened.

No, they do exist...and in large numbers.

In that wide chromatic and tonal spread , let's just call them "gray"... ;)

Link | Posted on May 30, 2016 at 10:58 UTC
On article Looking Sharp: A focus stacking tutorial (224 comments in total)

As a supplement to this excellent article, I would like to point out that, for Android users, DSLRController allows for programming and execution of focus stack sequences.

Even if you don't know a word of German you can see how here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXM5Rdlsf5s

Link | Posted on May 29, 2016 at 23:54 UTC as 46th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Novoflex clearly has failed to read the Leica crowd.
They could very well be asking $999 for it....better still, they could have gone with an agreement with Leica over it, slapped a red dot and ask $1,599 for the darn thing.

Again, excellent for you.

As for reading your blog, given the input here, I think I'll pass thank you.

I don't like B&W that much, specially as an argumentative stance.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 14:48 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Novoflex clearly has failed to read the Leica crowd.
They could very well be asking $999 for it....better still, they could have gone with an agreement with Leica over it, slapped a red dot and ask $1,599 for the darn thing.

Good for you...

Just a piece of advice, in a "public announcement" spirit: Being a "fan" of a brand, any brand, might be detrimental to Photography, as a creative medium.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 11:50 UTC
In reply to:

John _ Finn: Oh dear. Imagine the social disgrace when one is found to have fitted one of these ... adapters (ugh!) ... to one's Leica. One emerges from one's Bentley (Rolls Royces are strictly for the noveau riche) with the red-dot body around one's neck and then ... the gasps around the yacht club as the whisper spreads: "Peregrine can't afford a Leica lens ... he is using an adapter to fit a Canon! Haw, haw, haw". Really, it's enough to make one gag on one's Dom Perignon, it's such a ghastly prospect, darling. What *were* Novoflex thinking?

Since Leica doesn't make any optics with current technology longer than 280mm, I fear that temptation will just be too much and a flourishing market starts for black silk, golden-stitched, red-dot marked lenses covers.

This, in turn, will start a new urban social street game: "Uncover That Douch" :)

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 11:48 UTC
In reply to:

Kiril Karaatanasov: One would not be wise to put such hideous cheap thing on their Leica. Just look how many letters it has inscribed on it. Is this the surgeon general's warning of impeding health hazards when using adapters?..and this price of barely 500 Euro sort of tells that the materials used are likely carcinogenic and way below Leica manufacturing standards. It should have been priced and manufactured to the standards of SL i.e. cost around 5000 Euro and be made of high quality precious metals. I also wonder which Canon lenses are built to such standard to deserve place on your Leica SL body?

Either this is ironic and extremely funny or it is serious and extremely repugnant.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2016 at 11:42 UTC

Novoflex clearly has failed to read the Leica crowd.
They could very well be asking $999 for it....better still, they could have gone with an agreement with Leica over it, slapped a red dot and ask $1,599 for the darn thing.

Link | Posted on May 27, 2016 at 22:22 UTC as 17th comment | 9 replies
Total: 911, showing: 101 – 120
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