PhotoKhan

Lives in Portugal Cascais, Portugal
Works as a Airline pilot
Joined on Mar 22, 2003
About me:

A good photograph shows what you saw.
A superior ones conveys what you felt.

Comments

Total: 1084, showing: 41 – 60
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In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

Not only are they strange, they are intrinsic to Foveon technology.

Significant colorshifting artefacts at relatively low iSO are almost a trade mark of those sensors.

What I condone and cannot understand is the media and reviewers attitude toward this limitation, an attitude that is dismissive, apologetic or of simple absolute silence about it.

Although DPR is not specially at fault in this regard, it also seems to embark in said dismissive approaches, as demonstrated by the comment under Sam Spence’s photo, a comment that downplays both the facts that (a) an user should NOT be forced to correct colours to get a true representation of a subject’s skin, no matter how “breezy” the correction might be and (b) that the so-said “breezy”correction was not a successful one.

If the Foveon technology was vastly superior to other technologies, I am sure the specialized media would gladly echo our own enthusiasm about it with all kinds of hyperbolic journalistic buzz-words.

(Cont.)

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 19:59 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

No, it is all OK, worldcup1982, it's all OK, it's all in your eyes...I see people with green/purple patches in their skins all the time...If people want to participate in a mass illusion, let it be, it is all alright...As for Sigmas financial status we're not allowed to wonder about it...even price adjusting stunts like that amazing one with the SD1...that 2/3 price drop must have been super-duper-healthy for their books...

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 18:24 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

Sidetracking, once more...

Just a final thought: I have no problem with the issue, since I am not a Foveon user.

I take exception, though, with reviewers that systematically devaluate or omit how Foveon sensors make dealing with color difficult, because that is not helpful to photographers.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 12:34 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

https://4.img-dpreview.com/files/p/TS560x560~forums/59396643/2af543be15d14715b08c5b02258b89fe

https://3.img-dpreview.com/files/w/TS560x560?url=https%3A%2F%2F4.img-dpreview.com%2Ffiles%2Fp%2FTS6192x4128~sample_galleries%2F4388344015%2F3021183764.jpg&signature=pvnrddpVXoNP3sHMM5hlGvLzCoE%3D

https://3.img-dpreview.com/files/p/TS1600x1600~forums/59377688/d126fb2d47c24d83a17c8d982e7d81df

https://4.img-dpreview.com/files/p/TS1600x1600~forums/59394131/880462fa4ca342daa9a49df314284ce4

https://4.img-dpreview.com/files/p/TS940x940~forums/59395845/644fc69ab4984e85874d07820ec52007

https://2.img-dpreview.com/files/p/TS1600x1600~forums/59393119/5a61a7f264b34b1590d5deb5a96e714a

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 12:08 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

You can repeat this for as long as you want to. The outcome will always be the same: The Foveon output will have drastically more color casts (...and subdued colors, and selective colors misrepresentations...) than any other sensor, X-trans included (actually, X-trans renders excellent colors).

If you can't see it, I can't help you.

(cont.)

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 12:07 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

Good sidetracking, my photos...Unfortunately, (1) I am not talking about them, because none were done with a Foveon camera. (2) Many of them have creative color options that are not representative of regular OOC Jpeg outputs from the cameras used.

I see you avoided my challenge, so here are samples obtained in the precise proposed format:

The first 3 shots of the first posts (...at the time they were harvested...) in a forum that featured the icon indicating that post contained a photo.

The first block of 3 comes from the Sigma forum, the second block of three, from the entry-level Nikon DSLR forum (...I chose Nikon, just so you can't claim bias...)

All first 3 contain a color cast: Yellow, Yellow, Cyan
Only 1 of the Nikon ones features a color cast (Cyan/Yellow, on the third one)

(Cont.)

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 12:06 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

(Cont.)

As for your final assertion, I feel you are wrong and just sound like the many Sigma users I encountered years ago over at the Sigma forum and whose inability to see how radically more prevalent those casts are, coming Foveon sensors, made me come to rational conclusion I started these comments with:

Deuteranomaly might be a female dog but it is also an excellent Foveon ally.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 11:45 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

Color rendering is not a "particular aspect of photographs".

It is a crucial one.

If there was technology that I would consistently see being inaccurate as what comes down to any part of what constitutes a photograph as an whole and that fact was continuously being downplayed (...or omitted, altogether...) by reviewers, I would also be vocal about it, because I feel that the community, in general, is not well served by not pointing out specific shortcomings of specific technical solutions.

I shoot with Canon cameras and, for quite some years, they came up short in what relates to dynamic range. During that time, I was as vocal stating that it didn't justify all the hysterics surround it as I was fighting Canon fanboys that denied that that specific technical ability had ANY interest, whatsoever, for Photography.

(Cont.)

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 11:44 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

(Cont.)

You want to focus on whatever the justification might be suitable for this DNG round, I prefer to call the attention of the occasional reader that might be reading this piece (...hence, the "Comments" name of the place...) to what is a prevailing problem with Foveon sensors, something that is continually devaluated in reviews of Sigma cameras, like, in this particular instance, saying the compulsory adjustment was a "breeze", ignoring the facts that, sometimes, those adjustments are actually quite difficult to make and that it actually is still off in the presented " breezy correction".

...so prevailing is the problem, in fact, that I am confident to extend you a challenge:

Go to the Sigma forum, send me the very first 3 appended images to the current last posts, at any given time (excluding the those whose colors/WB are manipulated or played for creative purposes) and I will point out the color cast in every single one of them - because they WILL have it. 95+% of the time.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 10:50 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

"Can you do this from now on when posting?"

Simple.

Just call me a troll, the adult equivalent of inserting 2 fingers in one's ears and shouting "Shut up! Shut up! Shut up!", so common in preschooler's playgrounds, and I promise you a consistent outcome.

...You won't even need to have a DPR logo in front of your name...

As for the second reply, all I've noticed is that, while you don't seem to realize that, historically, Foveon sensors output and color casts go together like coffee and pie, at least, in this case, your admission of its existence in the presented series is increasing by each reply.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 10:27 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

Stopped at the first sentence. Troll it is then.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2017 at 17:17 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

If you think there were only 3 out of 70, maybe you could advise poor Sam Spencer to consult a liver doctor if his skin really looks like the original OOC DNG.

Alternatively, you can help him look for manager representation to get on the cover of "Lovely Pink Cheeks Babies" magazine, if his complexion is like what came after the touted "breezy" adjustments in ACR that, supposedly, made it all all-right.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2017 at 15:29 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

maxotics,

I apologize if I have offended you.

Please read on color blindness to understand the term was chosen not as an insult but as the only rational explanation for the number of users that are satisfied with the regular output of Foveon sensors.

You will find that colorblindness is more prevalent in more formats than you probably think it is. Especially check the term "Deuteranopes".

I simply have no other rational explanation for when people can't see the color casts like the ones shown in the provided samples.

Years ago, before I understood where the inability to see it might come from and foolishly tried to point the problem out to Sigma users on their forum, there where instances where I had users defending images tinted with lemon-yellow or pure-lavender veils as "perfectly OK".

I don't remember if you were one of them ;)

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2017 at 14:51 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

Mark,

1. Your reply cheery-picked the part of my commentary you can challenge.

Since you are in position where you can not freely discuss the remaining part, it would have been wise avoiding a reply altogether, as a reply from the staff is always perceived as an editorial one.

2. Nevertheless, your reply sparkled my curiosity: Can you provide numbers as to if the lens sales for this brand (...a very successful income channel...) are or are not providing the financial padding required for the insistence on Foveon camera products?

If you can't, maybe consider this as the kind of journalistic inquiries that would be potentially interesting for your community of readers instead of "What have you learned, from making the Art series?"

3. In the corporate world there are as many slow as there are swift commercial suicides. The only thing in common between them is that those responsible for the tragic outcomes are usually nowhere to be seen when the autopsy is finally done.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2017 at 14:41 UTC

You can "change the game" as much as you want, resorting to DNG included.

All these samples show color casts that are very difficult to balance, as samples 63 to 65 clearly and aptly show.

Foveon sensors far from being a photographers ally make color an enemy to contend with.

It has been so for 15 years and, apart from proving that a significant part of the population is, indeed, color blind, it is a mystery tantamount to commercial suicide why Sigma insists on this technical solution.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2017 at 11:54 UTC as 67th comment | 32 replies
On article Headed to Havana? Check out these photo spots (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

ancaster: As a Canadian, been going there for years. Had a friend who passed away and was running a skate boarding program down there, great shots. Check out fellow CDN Neil Ta's work using 35mm panoramic film, not the usual touristy stuff. Cubans around Havana know they are photographic opportunities, expect them to ask for compensation even if you catch them candidly and they notice afterward. All these old cars will be replaced by cheap imports with greater US influence, so while cliche, capture streets full of old Chevys while you can.

Neil Ta's Havana photos are superb, thank you for the heads-up.
There's one, in particular, that kind of sends shivers up the spine as to what might be in store for the martyrized Cuban people, as the flood gates slowly but irrevocably open to both the very good and the very bad.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2017 at 16:33 UTC
On article Leica offers free fix for faulty AF in some S lenses (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

iAPX: What's interesting is that Leica consider it's Lenses lifetime to be 5 years.

Even when they sell failing and faulty devices to consumer, at their impressive price tags, they don't think for a moment that they might last for 10 or 20 years. As it was for the older non-AF lenses.

This is clearly Leica's fault, and it should be fixed, whatever age of the lens. Or they have to clearly state that they might work for 5 years.

Leica is "no manufacturer". It is "THE manufacturer" that sells stuff with inordinate price premiums. Their service-money should be where their prestige-mouth is.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2017 at 00:31 UTC
On article Leica offers free fix for faulty AF in some S lenses (91 comments in total)

One day, some scholar will study why some brands have such permanent and militant good press, up to the point of turning the fixing of fully demonstrated broken design sound like something akin to a complete non-compulsory selfless endeavor, a most pure act of brotherly love.

Link | Posted on Apr 7, 2017 at 20:49 UTC as 35th comment

The thing with Very Low Light imagery is that seldom are human environments completely devoid of any kind of illumination. As such, whenever the ultra-sensitive device encounters any source of artificial light, no matter how small, the blooming from that source compromises large areas of the image. The more sensitive the device is, the more this is a problem.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 08:10 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

henrikbengtsson: What surprises me with the design alone is how it managed to make its path from the drawing board all the way to the production center without anyone saying "....wait a minute. NO!"

But I guess they all relied on hipster-oritended designer opinions.

My esteemed Henrik, you don't have an idea how these guru-tech companies work, do you?

The "visionary" of the day goes to the meeting, says some non sequiturs intended to sound philosophical that he just got at the latest "retreat" from his personal guru who, in turn, plagiarized while subverting it from a true thinker, drops the "I want this." and then is everybody back to their workstations.

If one is going to say "....wait a minute. NO!" at a meeting over there, he better have his Stars Wars paraphernalia already cleared from the desk.

Only saying "I have my doubts" will make him be dubbed "not a team player" and have his access to the vintage arcade games/protein shakes bar area revoked for 3 months.

See "Silicon Valley", the amazing TV series, for a very comprehensive crash course on the inner works of those high-tech, cloudy-fluffy companies, while having a belly full of laughs.

(See how obvious it is where the writers got their inspiration to depict Hooli as they do.)

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2017 at 11:27 UTC
Total: 1084, showing: 41 – 60
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