PhotoKhan

Lives in Portugal Cascais, Portugal
Works as a Airline pilot
Joined on Mar 22, 2003
About me:

A good photograph shows what you saw.
A superior ones conveys what you felt.

Comments

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Threading a very thin line here...

The project is undoubtedly inspiring and the results both artistically sound and very moving.

One has to wonder, though, if the willingness in participating in this project hasn't exposed the victims to an heightned emotional stress they did not anticipate.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 14:38 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

NicoPPC: Protecting private life of the president (like any other citizen) is a good thing. But, the photograph should not be treated as a criminal like it was..

Also the french government (from Macron) already made some new laws which reduce freedom..

I am not an American.

I am a Portuguese who lives in a country where these threats are incommensurably less significant.

Still, I am intelligent, empathic and informed enough to know what is at stake in what regards to such a crucial security target as the French president.

Didn't you read the papers on the 9th of August 2017?...on the19th of June 2017?...on the 6th of June 2017?...on the 20th of April 2017?...on the18th March 2017?...on the 3rd of February 2017?...on...on....on...?

Burying in your head in the sand as a means of denial won't lead you (...us...) anywhere.

Do you think that by being the President of France, not the US, Mr. Macron is not duly protected, with clear and decisive rules of engagement in place?

Again, that "photographer" can consider himself lucky to not have ended with a bullet in his head.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 11:44 UTC
In reply to:

NicoPPC: Protecting private life of the president (like any other citizen) is a good thing. But, the photograph should not be treated as a criminal like it was..

Also the french government (from Macron) already made some new laws which reduce freedom..

Again, from a security point of view, how do you differentiate between a photographer that "shouldn't be badly handled by the police" and just a terrorist posing as a photographer that "shouldn't be badly handled by the police"?

Due you understand the operational, real-time decisions authorities are faced with in the current brutal-force climate?

Can't you understand that the simple fact that he was trespassing on presidential grounds was reason enough to put a bullet in him and that makes the whinning and complaints about "being treated like a criminal" a complete delusdelusional claim by an idiotic human being that can't understand how lucky he is to be alive?

Again, what world are you (...and this "photographer"...) living in?

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 11:27 UTC
In reply to:

NicoPPC: Protecting private life of the president (like any other citizen) is a good thing. But, the photograph should not be treated as a criminal like it was..

Also the french government (from Macron) already made some new laws which reduce freedom..

In what world are you living in?

Haven't you heard what happened in Barcelona just a couple of days ago?

Do you know that Marseiille and the surrounding area can no longer be considered "European" but are, in this day and age, a demgraphic extension of North Africa?

Do you have a set of rules of engagement and procedures that you might provide to the French police that allows a trespassing "photographer" to be positively tagged as a "non-threat" to a president and his family?

Visit Disneyland much...?

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 08:46 UTC
In reply to:

panchorancho: Paparazzi are the only true photographers! The rest of you are sheep who follow orders like Pavlov's dog! Also it's ridiculous you're all judging and reading a bias article that doesn't even allow the photographer to have a rebuttal. Go paparazzi!

If YOU decide go paparazzi, just remember:

As narrated in the piece, if you try those very same stunts you may very well end up with a bullet in your head with no grounds for appeal regarding the rules of engagement that might dutifully be followed.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 08:38 UTC

The title and content is a clear case of tail-wagging-the-dog.
This is not a story about photograhy, nor a paparazzi, nor "invasion of privacy".
This a criminal instance of pure and simple trespassing.
(...by a very, very stupid human being, given the current security threat levels, I might add...)

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 08:34 UTC as 20th comment

There's something I don't understand...

If DPR is so adamant smartphones killed compacts and are now "coming for entry-level ILCs", up to the point of not clearly pointing out smartphones inevitable (...because they step from pure physics...) limitations, why not include them in the comparison tools, side-by-side with those very same cameras that, supposedly, they "went for"?

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 14:26 UTC as 288th comment | 1 reply

Resilience in a challenging event.
An heartfelt "Yoku yatta ne!" from a Canon user.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2017 at 12:45 UTC as 21st comment

Cape Þórðarhöfði, so it can be searched.

It seems it can also be reached on foot, in low tide, through a connecting sand strip to nearby road 76.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2017 at 23:21 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Question: Will there ever be an article written about Apple where the writer does not feel compelled to include some kind of superlative in the title?

Vlad S,

It is not a question of " If Apple's iPhones weren't great". They were great.

It is a question of having a single product to offer their clients for so long, something no other electronics brand would even think of, while still successfully imprinting a marketing-stemmed impression that they were "the" brand.

It is a question of them having been saying "here, this is what YOU need" for so long, something that tells a lot about the relation between Apple and their customers and even more about Apple users: They look at electronics from a passive "gimme whatever you have" attitude, not the "healthy" one of first pondering "What do I need?"

Even today, if you need something as simple as a dual-sim model, Apple does not have one for you because...well, because THEY know what YOU need.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 12:11 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Question: Will there ever be an article written about Apple where the writer does not feel compelled to include some kind of superlative in the title?

Another human brain characteristic at work here, what his brain went for, - since DL Cade, obviously, is not on Apple's payroll - was a unconscious "need" to associate those words on account of the times he (...like any of us...) has seen the association of a superlative designator with the brand in other article titles, the “seeding” ones of those having actually deliberately been written intentionally, not by journalists but by marketing power houses.

In neural linguistics, it the same process that creates popular “catch phrases”, except that it is an intentional one.

Couple this with the incessant – and, probably, extremely expensive – association of movies and TV series “appropriately positive” characters with Apple's products in one of the most aggressive, long-running product placement strategies I’ve ever witnessed and suddenly you have a significant part of the public going “They are the best. How can they not be?” when, in fact, they hardly ever are.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 08:55 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Question: Will there ever be an article written about Apple where the writer does not feel compelled to include some kind of superlative in the title?

No Grock, the human brain does not work with that level of separation and discerning capacity in mode 1 and, although "serious" reading is made in mode 2, titles are usually "browsed in" in mode 1.

Never noticed how, reading an article, you suddenly realize it was not about what you thought it would be and then, coming back to the title, you come to the conclusion that it was all your fault for incorrectly reading what was actually written? That is mode 1 tricking you (.. by the way, the larger the headline, in physical size terms, the more prone we are to be tricked by mode 1).

For a deeper understanding on how effective the simple associations of the words "Apple" and "topnotch" in a single phrase might be in that mode, read Daniel Kahneman's "Thinking, Fast and Slow".

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2017 at 08:53 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Question: Will there ever be an article written about Apple where the writer does not feel compelled to include some kind of superlative in the title?

You mean like the 6 years they had one single (!) iPhone model to offer their clients?

No, Apple also does average...

What's never average is the brainwashing.

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 18:29 UTC

Question: Will there ever be an article written about Apple where the writer does not feel compelled to include some kind of superlative in the title?

Link | Posted on Aug 7, 2017 at 17:48 UTC as 10th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

Nikoncanonfan: For goodness sake stop being cheapskates buying this junk don't you have pride over genuine canon products? I wouldn't wipe my backside with this stuff

...Pride over genuine Canon products...!?
...Shouldn't you be "Leicafan"?

Link | Posted on Aug 6, 2017 at 09:12 UTC

Ok, is it me or reading about the US military stopping using DJI drones is as odd as reading that Universal Studios will no longer use Sony camcorders?

I mean, how can the US Army have the same leisurely drone requirements I have...?

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2017 at 23:06 UTC as 31st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: That vulcano shot...Hmmm...

If I was a juror, I would ask for the RAW file.

I agree.

When I wrote, "I would ask for the Raw file", I meant to look for more egregious things.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 13:31 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: That vulcano shot...Hmmm...

If I was a juror, I would ask for the RAW file.

From the rules:

"Only minor burning, dodging and/or color correction is acceptable, as is minor cropping. High dynamic range images (HDR) and stitched panoramas are acceptable. Any changes to the original photograph not itemized here or in the Guidelines are unacceptable and will render the Submission ineligible for a prize."

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 12:21 UTC
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: Simply amazing and of high potential impact in Photography...a true paradigm changer, as claimed in the video.

(...also, if you understand what was talked about, the final demonstration why "zoom with your feet" is one of the most photographic-asinine statements ever written...)

...Jesus...

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 00:48 UTC
On article Intro to drones part 1: Drone basics (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoKhan: "and you must always carry these batteries on the plane with you, and never place them in checked baggage – no exceptions".

Incorrect.

LiPo batteries CAN be transported in checked baggage (...for the moment...).

They will, however, have to be installed in the destination device and switched off.

The provided link on your very own article correctly reproduces such IATA dispositions in "Q2/A".

Congratulations on an otherwise well-balanced, extremely informative article.

https://www.airnewzealand.com/dangerous-goods

https://www.aerlingus.com/media/pdfs/Guide_to_Dangerous_Goods.pdf

https://www.britishairways.com/cms/global/pdfs/ba.com_Table2.3A_Jan2009.pdf

http://www.iberia.com/wcs/documentos/antes-de-viajar/guia_objetos_peligrosos_en.pdf

https://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/baggage/dangerous.aspx

https://www.aircanada.com/ca/en/aco/home/plan/baggage/restricted-and-prohibited-items.html

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 00:46 UTC
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