dave gaines

dave gaines

Lives in United States Southern California, CA, United States
Works as a Structural Engineer
Joined on Nov 7, 2005
About me:

Photography is art when it makes us see something familiar in a new way, when it evokes emotion and when it is not only pleasing to the eye but strikingly vivid.
An Underwater photographer, I also capture topside nature, landscapes, scenics, wildflowers, historic architecture, ocean scenes, people, birds, bugs and other animals.
Nikon D800e & D850
15 Nikon FX lenses
Olympus E-330
Olympus C-8080
Underwater Ikelite housings for the E-330
Ikelite DS-125 strobes
UW I always use a focus light on a swivel mount

Comments

Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Hands-on with new Nikon FTZ II adapter (244 comments in total)

I think the FTZ offers an advantage in that you can mount a larger FX lens like the 24-70 f/2.8 or the 105mm f/1.4E ED lens on a tripod at a point closer to the center of mass for better balance.
Is it possible to put the Arca-Swiss style plate on the FTZ? Or can you run it between both the Z camera and the FTZ. Are the tripod mounts of the Z and FTZ at different heights or in the same plane? A long lens plate could be adapted to extend between the Z body and the FTZ, providing a longer base to clamp the tripod head to. Use washers as spacers if needed for different heights of the Z and FTZ tripod mount holes. Of course, that means the Z body and FTZ would be attached through the plate. To use the Z with an S lens that would require removing the plate because you'd remove the FTZ.
I don't plan to buy a Z9 for $5500. Maybe I'll adopt a MILC if they come out with a Z8 with all the advantages and upgrades of the Z9 but without the grip - priced more like a D850.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2021 at 20:08 UTC as 37th comment | 3 replies

When you buy consumer goods from an online retailer it's very hard, if not impossible, to tell where the product is made. This is especially true of Amazon, which appears to go to great lengths to disguise where a product is made. So too do many manufacturers. If you go to a manufacturer's website they usually don't tell you if it's made entirely or partially in a foreign country. Getting parts, service or repair is very hard for products made overseas. These products are often throw-away junk when they fail. That's why it should be mandatory to not only identify where a product is made, but also the percentage of parts by value that come from overseas. This info should be stated where ever the product is advertised. If you buy a car made in the USA the percent of parts that come from overseas should be shown.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2021 at 18:52 UTC as 17th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

dave gaines: This is one of very few fresh water habitats for birds in dry Southern California. Bolsa Chica needs protection, not drones.
Most people hate drones for a reason. They fly where they're not supposed to. If I see a drone over my yard, I'll be getting out the sling shot. Fortunately, it hasn't happened yet that I know of.

Ed, Ingold, no duh. A higher viewpoint is useful for may applications. But it's not welcome over bird sanctuaries, animal preserves, National Parks nor over private yards. Just because you can fly anywhere doesn't mean you should.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2021 at 23:11 UTC

This is one of very few fresh water habitats for birds in dry Southern California. Bolsa Chica needs protection, not drones.
Most people hate drones for a reason. They fly where they're not supposed to. If I see a drone over my yard, I'll be getting out the sling shot. Fortunately, it hasn't happened yet that I know of.

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2021 at 19:26 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

tom trinko: I agree that drone pilots have to follow the rules.

However I find it hard to believe that the birds are so poorly evolved that they fled their eggs just because a couple of drones crashed.

How would that be worse than say an eagle showing up or any number of other natural phenomena?

Eagles, either marine Bald eagles or mammal hunting Golden Eagles do not inhabit this preserve. This is one of very few fresh water habitats for birds in dry Southern California. Bolsa Chica needs protection, not drones.

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2021 at 19:13 UTC
In reply to:

dave gaines: The cinematic movie Barry Lyndon is worth watching for it's dramatic story and for the dark barn and night scenes they shot using this lens. If you can get a copy of movie to watch, notice the shallow DOF in the candlelight scenes.
Can the mount on this 50 mm f/0.7 lens be modified to shoot on a Nikon D850 or Fujifilm GFX 100 MF camera? What was the modified Michell camera? It must have been a 35 mm cinemaphotography camera, right?

Mermaidkiller, that's a terrible moniker. Most people love mermaids. :-)
The Nikon D850 has a much longer flange setback distance than the mirrorless Z or the Canon R series. Not insufficient but too big.
I'd almost want to buy a mirrorless just to shoot with this lens. But I can't afford the Zeiss lens any more than I can afford the Nikon 55 mm f/0.95 lens. For all the camera components it doesn't have that DSLRs do, mirrorless is getting to be very expensive.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2021 at 21:46 UTC
In reply to:

dave gaines: It looks like this Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm F0.7 lens has an integral shutter with speeds from 1/200 second to 32 seconds. It also looks like it's got a European electrical connector on the side. What's that for? There's a manually controlled aperture ring too, unlike a lot of modern Nikon G and E lenses.

Very cool. It takes a big flash to illuminate the dark side of the moon.
Thanks for the insight.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2021 at 21:32 UTC

It looks like this Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm F0.7 lens has an integral shutter with speeds from 1/200 second to 32 seconds. It also looks like it's got a European electrical connector on the side. What's that for? There's a manually controlled aperture ring too, unlike a lot of modern Nikon G and E lenses.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2021 at 17:18 UTC as 34th comment | 2 replies

The cinematic movie Barry Lyndon is worth watching for it's dramatic story and for the dark barn and night scenes they shot using this lens. If you can get a copy of movie to watch, notice the shallow DOF in the candlelight scenes.
Can the mount on this 50 mm f/0.7 lens be modified to shoot on a Nikon D850 or Fujifilm GFX 100 MF camera? What was the modified Michell camera? It must have been a 35 mm cinemaphotography camera, right?

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2021 at 17:11 UTC as 36th comment | 4 replies
On article Why are modern 50mm lenses so damned complicated? (911 comments in total)
In reply to:

dave gaines: You show the lens construction of the Zeiss Otus 55mm F1.4 without really talking about it much. It appears to be as complex as the others with a different configuration. It resembles the Nikon Z the most, IMO. Sure, it costs almost double what the Sony GM, Nikon Z and Canon RF 50 mm f/1.2 cost, bus is it worth it? I've yet to see an MTF chart for the Zeiss Otus 55mm F1.4. Mr. Cicala, is there a review and MTF chart on your website? How can we compare this Zeiss lens to the others in this article?

@RCicala The MTF charts for the Zeiss Otus 55 mm f/1.4 compares very closely to the MTF for the Nikon AF-S 105 mm f/1.4 E ED Nanocoat lens. If it's sharper than the 105 mm f/1.4 E ED, as the MTF suggests it is, then it is a very sharp lens.
I expect to receive my copy of the Zeiss Otus 55 in about a week. I'm looking forward to it. With these two lenses I'll have two very sharp options for portraits and night scenes.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2021 at 19:21 UTC
On article Why are modern 50mm lenses so damned complicated? (911 comments in total)
In reply to:

dave gaines: You show the lens construction of the Zeiss Otus 55mm F1.4 without really talking about it much. It appears to be as complex as the others with a different configuration. It resembles the Nikon Z the most, IMO. Sure, it costs almost double what the Sony GM, Nikon Z and Canon RF 50 mm f/1.2 cost, bus is it worth it? I've yet to see an MTF chart for the Zeiss Otus 55mm F1.4. Mr. Cicala, is there a review and MTF chart on your website? How can we compare this Zeiss lens to the others in this article?

Thanks Rodger. I read the review in your link. That link helped me compare the Zeiss Otus 55 mm f/1.4 to other current full frame Nikon FX and Canon L mount offerings. The only Nikon lens I found that came close to being as sharp was the Nikon 200 mm f/2.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2021 at 19:09 UTC
On article Why are modern 50mm lenses so damned complicated? (911 comments in total)

You show the lens construction of the Zeiss Otus 55mm F1.4 without really talking about it much. It appears to be as complex as the others with a different configuration. It resembles the Nikon Z the most, IMO. Sure, it costs almost double what the Sony GM, Nikon Z and Canon RF 50 mm f/1.2 cost, bus is it worth it? I've yet to see an MTF chart for the Zeiss Otus 55mm F1.4. Mr. Cicala, is there a review and MTF chart on your website? How can we compare this Zeiss lens to the others in this article?

Link | Posted on May 10, 2021 at 00:56 UTC as 145th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

zakk9: "Ignorant man saved by useless app" would have been a more describing headline.

Before mobile phones, most people new that they should take a topographic map and a compass when hiking. Electronic devices are of no use unless one has a reliable power source available, like solar panels. Unfortunately, those electronic devices that people think they can rely on are also making us increasingly narrow minded.

Yes, I'm old fashioned, and I do miss those days when people didn't rely on Google and a battery for their survival.

No, he didn't break his leg. Read the article again. He got lost, which is pretty easy to do. It happens to me in the desert or the snow, where everything looks the same. Carry a topo map and a compass and check your bearings when you start and often along the way.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2021 at 15:16 UTC

A decent hand held HAM radio is easy to carry. Some have replaceable battery packs. Cost $50 to $250. There are a couple of frequencies that are useable and monitored in the local mountains. It's a way to call for help when needed.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2021 at 15:12 UTC as 13th comment
In reply to:

dave gaines: This story was emailed to me by the LA Co Sherriff's office. I had a hunch about where the photo was taken but I wasn't sure. Twin Peaks south of Mt Waterman is a rugged, long day hike.
Know before you go. Take a topo map and compass and keep reading your headings from start to finish. Or carry your GPS tracking device with spare batteries.
Cell phones have a very limited battery life, but you can carry a battery booster pack. There's no signal in most areas of these mountains.
Carry extra water and clothes to bivouac overnight. There are 12 essential items to carry on any hike. Find out what they are and make sure you have them in your pack.

A decent hand held HAM radio is easy to carry. Some have replaceable replaceable battery packs. There are a couple of frequencies that are useable in the local mountains. It's a way to call for help when needed.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2021 at 15:10 UTC
In reply to:

Horshack: "Unfortunately, Compean had disabled location tracking on his phone, something he says he will not do moving forward after his ordeal, so the image's metadata was unhelpful in locating the missing hiker. "

I'm confused - why send his friend an image to help locate him by visuals rather than just temporarily enabling the GPS on his phone and tracking his way back and/or sending his friend his GPS location? On iPhone's this can be done within iMessage - on Android phones you can get your location via Google Maps and copy 'n paste that into an SMS.

Good to know. Thanks. I'm betting he wish he had less notoriety about now.
Cell phones don't get a signal in most areas of the San Gabriel Mountains. You need to rely on some other method of self rescue. See my post above.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2021 at 19:21 UTC

This story was emailed to me by the LA Co Sherriff's office. I had a hunch about where the photo was taken but I wasn't sure. Twin Peaks south of Mt Waterman is a rugged, long day hike.
Know before you go. Take a topo map and compass and keep reading your headings from start to finish. Or carry your GPS tracking device with spare batteries.
Cell phones have a very limited battery life, but you can carry a battery booster pack. There's no signal in most areas of these mountains.
Carry extra water and clothes to bivouac overnight. There are 12 essential items to carry on any hike. Find out what they are and make sure you have them in your pack.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2021 at 19:16 UTC as 37th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Horshack: "Unfortunately, Compean had disabled location tracking on his phone, something he says he will not do moving forward after his ordeal, so the image's metadata was unhelpful in locating the missing hiker. "

I'm confused - why send his friend an image to help locate him by visuals rather than just temporarily enabling the GPS on his phone and tracking his way back and/or sending his friend his GPS location? On iPhone's this can be done within iMessage - on Android phones you can get your location via Google Maps and copy 'n paste that into an SMS.

His cell phone was going dead. It's of no use when the battery dies.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2021 at 19:08 UTC
In reply to:

dave gaines: DSLR bodies may be "dragging the market down", as CIPA says. I think it's a wait and see reaction.
As a Nikon DSLR owner, I hesitate to investing any further in high grade lenses until Nikon indicates it's going to continue producing high quality DSLR bodies. There's speculation that they might produce an upgrade to the 3 year old D850, which is already a stellar, best in class DSLR. The D6 is so far garnering little enthusiasm for it as an upgrade to the D5. Owners of the D5 frequently say there isn't enough change in the D6 from the D5 to warrant an upgrade. The D780 was the last significant DSLR upgrade from Nikon.
If Nikon indicates it is going to continue the DSLR FX lens of cameras then people will continue to buy into the system.

Many DSLR owners are not convinced that the mirrorless Nikon Z6II or Z7II is a good upgrade to a DSLR with an optical viewfinder and faster focus. We'll have to wait to see what the Z9 is going to offer. But the Z system seems like a way for Nikon to sell new, more expensive bodies and lenses to people willing to make the switch.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2021 at 17:25 UTC

DSLR bodies may be "dragging the market down", as CIPA says. I think it's a wait and see reaction.
As a Nikon DSLR owner, I hesitate to investing any further in high grade lenses until Nikon indicates it's going to continue producing high quality DSLR bodies. There's speculation that they might produce an upgrade to the 3 year old D850, which is already a stellar, best in class DSLR. The D6 is so far garnering little enthusiasm for it as an upgrade to the D5. Owners of the D5 frequently say there isn't enough change in the D6 from the D5 to warrant an upgrade. The D780 was the last significant DSLR upgrade from Nikon.
If Nikon indicates it is going to continue the DSLR FX lens of cameras then people will continue to buy into the system.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2021 at 17:24 UTC as 7th comment | 15 replies
Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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