FilmORbitz

FilmORbitz

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Apr 10, 2016

Comments

Total: 31, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Ken60: Two more minor observations , James Earl Jones must have been in the legal profession for years, but the scroll in the mouth is not a good look . ...... and Roger C is so lucky to have interiors of Rosslyn, as these have been banned since the very early 1980s ...... I am jealous.

BINGO! A recent PBS show (Great Estates Scotland) had a multitude of Rosslyn interior shots. So I expect, as usual, access to the heavenly requires an appropriate tithe.

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2021 at 06:43 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: What a deliberate move of Facebook to compete with Google's YT. Fire its biggest canon IG against it and see it burning to ashes. Are we seeing the beginning of the end of FB here?

One can only dream.

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2021 at 06:12 UTC

Why does this exist? I'll explain:
The world is analog, and this meter provides a more graceful trip for electrons that are not in need of digital massaging to be useful. It has a slide rule, an ancient device sufficient to get men to the moon--but a total mystery if your boxers are worn over your pants. It does not have a digital display--like the world needs more of those, flashing.
If I'm honest, the most enjoyable pictures I ever took involved B/W film and a trusty Pentax. Analog again.
So consult your iPhone if there is a tower nearby, shoot your 20-fps spray of exposures, then get off of my damn lawn.

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2021 at 03:44 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

dwill23: We already pay a tax each time we fly our drones. The electricity coming out of our outlets is taxed.

Freedom or Government. The choice is binary. Ask yourself, does this make me more free or less free. Almost always there's a clear answer.

dwill23: Try this mind experiment--imagine everything that you touch or encounter in your daily life that is regulated in some fashion. Your electrical devices, door knobs, shoe size, food content, paint on your walls, your car, your car license, your driving license, your required insurance. It is an ENDLESS list.
Everyone wants to believe they are "free". Couldn't be further from the truth.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2021 at 19:45 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): I can walk around any public property in the US without fear of being taxed.
I can ride my bike for miles and miles around my home on trails without paying tax.

This is 100% about taking money from the middle class and giving it to the rich and corporations. And obviously it will hurt the hobbits who makes $10-12 an hour in the US versus the rich living off investments and paying almost no federal taxes.

Ric 360: The "public property" you traverse is kept passible by the taxes you pay. Thank you !

Nothing is free. And drones, cool as they are, may be an unwise discretionary expense for a $10/hour employee. They might want to consider a little investing along with spending.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2021 at 19:27 UTC

Looks like the next offerings from Phase and Hassy will be somewhat more affordable, so Thank You Fuji. Most appealing feature is that there's no phone hanging off the back.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2019 at 18:13 UTC as 14th comment

Disconcerting shots of the dummy head completely missing steering wheel airbag to the left, followed by a serving of A-pillar.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2019 at 18:00 UTC as 7th comment
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1100 comments in total)
In reply to:

dynaxx: Is a resistance to change part of our make-up ? Are we reluctant to change our buying preferences if it suggests we may have been wrong in our previous purchases ? Do we confuse this emotional resistance to change with brand loyalty ? I am reminded of the conversation ( on the 'phone, of course ) Sir Walter Raleigh had with Queen Elizabeth I when he explained what a great break-through smoking tobacco would be for humanity.
If the hinged-mirror, prism and the second sensor for auto-focus was presented as a new camera design today we would laugh it out of court.

Joe--good for you, but coal and gas ARE the source of energy for 99% of "electric" cars at the moment. But THAT was not the point. Please don't pretend I said they were the ONLY electrical sources.

It takes mere minutes to realize that there are a thousand things more productive than commenting on this site...

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 15:53 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1100 comments in total)
In reply to:

dynaxx: Is a resistance to change part of our make-up ? Are we reluctant to change our buying preferences if it suggests we may have been wrong in our previous purchases ? Do we confuse this emotional resistance to change with brand loyalty ? I am reminded of the conversation ( on the 'phone, of course ) Sir Walter Raleigh had with Queen Elizabeth I when he explained what a great break-through smoking tobacco would be for humanity.
If the hinged-mirror, prism and the second sensor for auto-focus was presented as a new camera design today we would laugh it out of court.

Hey Wally-go ahead and list the other sources I intentionally left out so there would be room for YOUR earth-shattering contribution. We'll wait...

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 15:04 UTC
On article Nikon D850 vs Sony a7R III: Which is best? (1100 comments in total)
In reply to:

dynaxx: Is a resistance to change part of our make-up ? Are we reluctant to change our buying preferences if it suggests we may have been wrong in our previous purchases ? Do we confuse this emotional resistance to change with brand loyalty ? I am reminded of the conversation ( on the 'phone, of course ) Sir Walter Raleigh had with Queen Elizabeth I when he explained what a great break-through smoking tobacco would be for humanity.
If the hinged-mirror, prism and the second sensor for auto-focus was presented as a new camera design today we would laugh it out of court.

Actually, the "electrical cell" car is powered by coal or gas vapors burning elsewhere, requiring a wired delivery system and very frequent stops to top off said electrical cell. But you know that. Neither system is vastly superior as both have strengths and weaknesses--Just like these two cameras. So a DSLR user's decision to NOT sell off then rebuy everything for questionable benefit is not irrational.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 14:29 UTC
In reply to:

Felice62: Who, in the known universe, would ever want to use this monster? Really?

A company is free to offer anything they want at any price they want. In the case of Phase, the products are costly to develop and manufacture and the market small and demanding. If it sells, the company thrives, and the next increment can be financed. If they miscalculate or underperform, they are gone--simple survival of the fittest. Nothing new here.

Why does everyone waste so much effort whining about such a commonplace dynamic?

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2017 at 04:20 UTC
In reply to:

SirSeth: Do you think an A7iii is on the heels? That's what I was expecting next. What would Sony hold back to differentiate? Maybe dual SD, battery, and 36mp without the FPS of the A9 or resolution of the A7Riii?

It gets tiring remembering and reminding how many "new" features have been stolen from Pentax cameras that cost significantly less. A K-3II or K-1 fill most still phtotographers needs, and are built like tanks. These $3K-$6K cameras are simply too expensive. And the Sony a7x series cameras are miserable in hand--DSLRs still rule ergonomics.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2017 at 17:49 UTC

I like that the 645Z beats the 810 for "Sports"...

Aside from that revelation, lordy folks--don't you all have anything better to do???

Link | Posted on Oct 15, 2017 at 04:20 UTC as 28th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

GodSpeaks: At least three problems immediately come to mind:
1: It's wireless. I absolutely do NOT want a wireless keyboard.
2: It uses builtin rechargeable batteries. What do you do when the battery fails, as it will?
3: Price.

I have several Logitech wireless devices (keyboards, mice, trackpads) and they are extremely efficient to the point that I can't remember when I last changed the batteries. And a screwdriver plus common sense is all it takes to replace nearly any Lithium or other battery made. The $200 price would be appropriate if there were several wheels or sliders, but is a bit much for this simple unit. Optical encoders are dirt cheap.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 02:24 UTC
In reply to:

starwolfy: This sounds crazy to me. In my country engagement rules are very strict. A policeman cannot shot someone who is not a direct threat. And to judge if someone is a threat the policeman has to evaluate the position of his target and also his attitude. If someone has a gun and is running the opposite way, his back facing the police officer, this is not considered a direct threat anymore. If the police officer get over this and shoots this person in the back then this is considered an assassination.

Overeager cop who needs a job compatible with his stress tolerance and poor vision.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 02:07 UTC
In reply to:

Andrew S10: Reading between the lines, I surmise that the deputy shot the photographer because he was jumpy; he saw something in the photographer's hand and didn't identify whether it was innocuous or not. I seriously doubt that the deputy is so incompetent as to not know the difference between a camera and a gun.

Law enforcement can't just shoot people out of suspicion that they might have a gun, they have to 1st have a gun & 2nd be using it unlawfully, e.g. threatening with it.

Yes, in the dark. If his vision is that bad at night, he shouldn't be driving a car, much less shooting people without cause.
Confusion and uncertainty is NOT justification to discharge a gun. Sorry.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 02:03 UTC
On article Now we know: Sony a9 is sharper than we thought (386 comments in total)

I understand the need to manually-focus all lenses/all cameras for the studio shot pixel peepers. But it seems that a big chunk of information is being thrown out by this procedure, namely, the camera/lens combo's autofocusing variability, which you are now revealing to be a non-trivial issue. I for one would like to know whether Camera A is more or less variable in focus acquisition than Camera B, and by how much. Speaks to both the mechanical goodness of the moving parts, as well as the magic behind the curtain. That consumers hope this variability is vanishingly small on a $4500 camera goes without saying, but currently we have no way of knowing.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2017 at 03:25 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (931 comments in total)
In reply to:

markg26: Pentax MX. All mechanical, huge viewfinder, LED metering, great lenses available.

Still have my MX ... but was shocked to discover the lower edge of the film door has self-destructed. If you have one tucked away you might want to check this.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 06:35 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (931 comments in total)
In reply to:

drent: Ah, the Pentax K1000. 40 years ago. My first steps. You had to think before you shoot. I still do. Do current photographers just shoot 400 pics and then pic the best one?

I believe it's called "movie highlight" mode. There are at least 3 or 4 good ones per hundred.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 06:29 UTC
On article Canon EOS 77D Review (289 comments in total)
In reply to:

FilmORbitz: My Pentax K-3II, purchased new for less than $800, has all of the missing features that folks are bitching about here, except fancy video modes (which Pentax believes is the job of Video Cameras). Plus physical build quality second to none.
If you want to take pictures, with excellent color reproduction, there are choices beyond Canikon. And it has all of the buttons anyone could ask for, and the easy-of-use that goes with that.

Let the but..but...but..stone-hurling begin!!!

This is the anti-Pentax mantra (poor focus tracking) but I haven't found it to be a major issue. I live less than a mile from a huge bird sanctuary where the issue isn't focussing, but rather getting close enough in a facility that forbids any sort of photographer blinds. And there are techniques that increase the odds of getting good shots that may not being used by all. I am not arguing that a K-3II will hang with the focussing of a D500, because it won't. But because I also take pictures of things that haven't moved in hundreds or thousands of years, focus tracking is not at the top of my list, rather it's build quality, reliability, features, and usability.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2017 at 01:36 UTC
Total: 31, showing: 1 – 20
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